40,000 DONEGAL FANS HIT THE CAPITAL FOR ALL-IRELAND SUNDAY

first_imgTHEY don’t all have tickets, but more than 40,000 Donegal fans are either in Dublin or on the road to the capital for All-Ireland Final Sunday.Hotels are booked out and the phrase ‘Any Tickets?’ has been repeated a million times and Donegal and Mayo go head-to-head for the 2012 title.There was a real party atmosphere in Dublin last night among fans who travelled yesterday. The pubs and clubs of the city were awash with the colours of both counties.So there might be a few sore heads about Croke Park this afternoon.There are loads of parties across Donegal too for those who’ve decided to stay on home soil and watch the match on TV.Meanwhile Gardai are appealing to fans to take care on the roads before and after today’s game.  40,000 DONEGAL FANS HIT THE CAPITAL FOR ALL-IRELAND SUNDAY was last modified: September 22nd, 2012 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:000 DONEGAL FANS HIT THE CAPITAL FOR ALL-IRELAND SUNDAY40last_img read more

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Advocate of poor turns 40

first_img Kathi Frazier, another board member, was a client more than a decade ago, fighting with a landlord who was threatening to withdraw from a subsidized housing program and raise rents more than $200 per unit. After a two-year legal battle, Neighborhood Legal Services won the case for the tenants and set a precedent: Landlords in California who withdraw from federal rent subsidy programs are subject to local rent control rules. The outcome so inspired Frazier that she returned to school and helped found the West Valley Community Development Corp., a nonprofit company that builds homes for low-income people like herself. “The rich can afford an attorney when they need it; people in my case can’t. It is a service so desperately needed in the poor, working-class communities. “A lot of people don’t know how to access the system, how to do things as simple as suing a landlord for not doing things the proper way,” she said. It’s evident outside the Van Nuys Self Help Center, where dozens of people gather nearly every day of the week for the simplest legal advice or at the Pacoima office, where the phones are hardly ever silent. Legal assistance is available in nine languages, from Korean to Armenian. Every year, the staff of 40 attorneys and 25 paralegals assists thousands of poor clients in everything from evictions to consumer fraud. The federally funded center, which has two fully staffed offices and three self-help centers, is expanding this year. It is home to one of the nation’s largest health advocacy programs of its kind for the poor. A Glendale office staffed with 14 attorneys will open next month. And four more self-help centers – where poor clients can find free legal assistance on family law and housing matters – will open in courthouses in San Fernando, Long Beach and Santa Monica. “There is no other legal service in the Northeast Valley that has done as much in protecting people in the Valley, whether it’s consumer protection, health care and renters’ right. They do everything they can to protect them from the basic necessities,” said Assemblywoman Cindy Montanez, D-San Fernando. The center also has taken on several high-profile cases, including a challenge to the Los Angeles Unified School District’s practice of allocating more money to wealthy schools. The litigation resulted in a 1992 consent decree mandating the most basic educational funds be distributed equally. In another contentious case, nearly two decades old, it challenged the Los Angeles Police Department’s response to domestic violence calls and won a court order ordering the new training procedures for officers. “If this wasn’t here, I don’t know what I would do,” said Margarita Vazquez, a 66-year-old Pacoima grandmother, who sought help from the Pacoima center earlier this month after her dentist threatened to charge her for a surgery he didn’t perform. “The people that don’t have insurance or don’t know what to do, they help us.” Rachel Uranga, (818) 713-3741 rachel.uranga@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Created at the height of the civil rights era in a shabby storefront in Pacoima, the Neighborhood Legal Services of Los Angeles County was a modest place where the poor could get help for their problems – large and small. In the decades since, the center has become one of the nation’s leading advocates for the poor, with a $10 million budget and a small army of attorneys. “Thirty years ago people used to tell me that if they had money, they would go to a real lawyer. They don’t say that anymore,” said Yvonne Maria Jimenez, who started as a paralegal and is now an attorney and one of the directors of the nonprofit agency. Those kinds of stories abound at the center, which is marking its 40th anniversary this month. last_img read more

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Roemmich Named MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week

first_imgLast week, Roemmich helped Drake go 5-0, getting at least one hit in every win. She led the team with a .563 batting average, going 9-for-16 at the plate with one double, her first career home run, four walks, five RBI, seven runs scored while compiling a .650 on-base percentage and .813 slugging percentage. In her second season, Roemmich, who has started all 45 games at shortstop, leads Drake with a .350 batting average, two triples, 10 doubles, 28 runs scored and 50 hits. She is blistering MVC pitching with a .424 batting average, which ranks third in the MVC. This is the first career MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week award for Roemmich, who is a biology major with a 4.00 cumulative grade point average. 2017-18 Drake Missouri Valley Scholar-Athletes of the WeekSept. 6 – Josh Yeager – Men’s Cross CountrySept. 13 – Kyle Brandt – Men’s Cross CountryOct. 4 – Kyla Inderski – VolleyballNov. 28 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballNov. 28 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 6 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballDec. 6 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballDec. 13 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 3 – Nick McGlynn, Men’s BasketballJan. 10 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballJan. 10 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballJan. 17 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballJan. 17 – Nick McGlynn, Men’s BasketballJan. 31 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballFeb. 7 – Reed Timmer, Men’s BasketballFeb. 7 – Maddy Dean, Women’s BasketballFeb. 14 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballMarch 1 – Reed Timmer, Women’s BasketballMarch 7 – Becca Hittner, Women’s BasketballMarch 14 – Maddy Dean, Women’s BasketballMarch 21 – Sara Rhine, Women’s BasketballApril 4 – Taryn Pena, SoftballApril 18 – Taryn Rolle, Track and FieldsApril 25 – Mandi Roemmich, Softball Print Friendly Version Roemmich’s honor brings the Bulldogs total up to 25 Scholar-Athlete of the Week honors this season, the most of any Valley program. Roemmich is the second Drake softball student-athlete to be named MVC Scholar-Athlete of the Week after Taryn Pena (Columbia, Ill.) earned the honor on April 4. ST. LOUIS, Mo. – Sophomore infielder Mandi Roemmich (West Des Moines, Iowa) of the Drake University softball team has been selected Missouri Valley Conference Scholar-Athlete of the Week presented by Enterprise Bank and Trust Company, MVC Commissioner Doug Elgin announced Wednesday, April 25. Roemmich and Giovanni Garbella of the Valparaiso University team were honored for their performances during the period of April 16-22.last_img read more

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Women’s Soccer Falls, 1-0, in Overtime to No. 21 Baylor

first_img ESPN+ Full Schedule Roster Story Links Box Score (PDF) Photos Live Stats at Saint Louis 9/1/2019 – 1 PM Watch Live Next Game: Preview DES MOINES, IOWA — The Drake University women’s soccer team lost a closely-contested match to No. 21 Baylor, 1-0, in overtime on Friday night at Cownie Soccer Complex. Baylor’s Camryn Wendlandt headed home the deciding goal in the 95th minute off an assist from Kylie Ross.”I think everyone saw a glimpse of our team’s potential tonight,” head coach Lindsey Horner said. “Our individual performances and willingness to work for the player next to us was tremendous.”The Bulldogs’ defense routinely rejected relentless attacks from the Lady Bears, and junior goalkeeper Kelsie Stone stopped a season-best nine shots. Stone, a second-team All-MVC selection in 2018, made a remarkable save in the 27th minute when she fully extended to tap a Baylor strike just over the top-right corner of the bar. Midfielders Vanessa Kavan and Cassie Rohan were all over the field defending advances by the Lady Bears. The duo disrupted numerous Baylor passes, helping to thwart 20 of the Lady Bears’ 21 shot attempts.”To hold Baylor scoreless through regulation says a lot about how far our back line has come,” Horner said. “We had to be physical, brave, organized, and technically sound in defending our box. We were really disappointed in our performance after Denver, yet equally proud of the team tonight.”Drake’s attack generated six shots and two corner kick opportunities. Hannah Bormann and Erika Townley each put a shot on goal for the Bulldogs.Drake (0-3-0) travels to Missouri to take on the Saint Louis Billikens on Sunday, Sept. 1 at 1 p.m.”Losing in overtime is both physically and emotionally draining,” Horner said. “Our Saint Louis game will come quick. Our challenge is building on the standard our players set for themselves tonight and to do so on tired legs.”Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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South Africa’s economy ‘to grow 3.6%’

first_imgGlobal developments the biggest threat China overtook the United States in 2009 to become Africa’s main trading partner.It has also became the main destination for South African exports since the middle of 2009 and is the leading source of imports.South Africa became a member of the Brics – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – group in December.“The challenge for the government is to show that it has a purposeful plan to engage with BRIC countries, to prioritise its productive capacity, and to maximise its contribution to the national economy,” the report found.“Another challenge is to avoid neglecting traditional partners while nurturing its strategically important emerging partnerships.” China now Africa’s main trading partner 7 July 2011 South Africa’s economy is expected to grow at a rate of 3.6 percent this year and 4.3 percent in 2012, according to the African Economic Outlook 2011 report.“South Africa’s real GDP has recovered from -1.7 percent in 2009 to 2.8 percent in 2010, driven primarily by a steady recovery in consumer spending, partially attributed to the Fifa World Cup,” the SA Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA) said when releasing the report on Tuesday.“This rate of GDP growth remained clearly below trend, estimated around four percent per annum for South Africa.”The report was co-authored by the African Development Bank, the OECD Development Centre, the United Nations Development Programme, and the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa.It looks at economic, social and political development in 51 of Africa’s 53 countries.The report found that Africa had weathered the global crisis relatively well, with growth of 4.9 percent in 2010.However, political problems in North Africa and rising food and fuel prices could slow growth down to 3.7 percent in 2011.Sub-Saharan Africa was expected to grow faster than North Africa, with a predicted growth rate of 5.8 percent in 2012. The report said the major threat to South Africa’s economic outlook was global economic developments.South Africa had achieved its first Millennium Development Goal by halving the proportion of the population living on less than US$1 a day.However, the government still needed to tackle issues such as providing adequate public health services, improving the quality of education, and reducing unemployment, especially for the youth, the report found.HIV/Aids remained a problem as South Africa had the world’s largest population of people living with HIV – 5.6-million.The report found that structural problems like infrastructure bottlenecks hampered recovery in private investment in 2010.Unemployment was still very high last year even though it declined marginally in the fourth quarter of 2010 to 24 percent from 25.3 percent in the previous quarter.“Infrastructure bottlenecks and labour market constraints are likely to prevent a return to the pre-crisis growth rates in 2011 and 2012.“However, growth in the medium term (post-2012) is expected to be stronger as the massive infrastructure development projects being undertaken by state-owned enterprises, such as Eskom and Transnet, start to bear fruit,” SAIIA said.South Africa’s close economic ties to the global economy suggest growth could be affected by the evolution of the European Union, US and Chinese economies, and the trend of capital flows to emerging markets.Sapalast_img read more

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View From the Cab

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Pamela SmithDTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology EditorDECATUR, Ill. (DTN) — Scott Wallis is a nuts-and-bolts row-crop farmer. The Princeton, Indiana, farmer loves everything about making a crop of corn and soybeans come to life and coaxing every bushel he can from a plot of land.There is something he gets more charged up about than agronomy, though, and that’s family. Four generations till and toil at Wallis Farms today, ranging from age 83 to 1 year. Another grandson is due to arrive soon.Wallis Farms has been expanding in recent years to accommodate this growing brood. That’s something DTN readers can look forward to learning more about in coming months. The Wallis family is one of two farms selected to report on current crop conditions and various aspects of farm life in a weekly series DTN calls “View From the Cab.”Also reporting will be Ashley Andersen who farms with her husband, Jarett, their three children, and his parents, Tim and Kim, near Blair, Nebraska. We’ll be introducing more about their farm family in a separate, upcoming article.Here’s an introduction to Wallis Farms and what’s happening in their world:WALLIS FARMS — PRINCETON, INDIANAThe Wallis family plans to plant 2,000 acres of corn and 1,100 acres of soybeans this year. So far they haven’t turned a wheel. The 5.5 inches of rain they received over the last two weeks in three separate weather events has kept work at a standstill. The forecast isn’t good for that to change with chances of additional rain predicted for the coming week.Scott Wallis’ grandfather started a tradition of recording daily rainfall totals when he bought the southwestern Indiana homestead in 1951. The family has kept that practice alive, and having access to daily rainfall data offers unique historical perspective.“It’s been a long time since we didn’t plant one acre in April,” Scott said. “But I was surprised that our total of 6.2 inches for the month is still below the five- and 10-year average.“That total is above the 25- and 50-year average, but for me, it documents what we’re experiencing. These days we tend to get fewer rain events, but they come in bigger volumes. We just don’t often get those gentle 1-inch rains anymore.”Weather and compressed planting windows are definitely factoring into management decisions at the farm. Scott’s father, Bob, is still a valuable part of the team when it comes time to go to the field, but sometimes there aren’t enough man-hours to cover the work hours.Scott’s son, J.R. Wallis, and J.R.’s wife, Nikki, joined the farm in 2014. In January 2019, Scott’s son-in-law, Brad Winter, left his job at an electric utility company to join the farm.“Brad had a desire to farm and we were depending on his labor more and more in his off hours. This year we’re able to bring him into the business and feel really good about that,” Scott said. “But we wanted to incorporate him thoughtfully into the business because leaving a good off-farm job is a serious thing in the current farming environment.”Brad’s wife (and Scott’s daughter), Abby, works for the USDA Farm Service Agency. Another daughter, Elizabeth, and her husband, Robbie, live off the farm.“Make no mistake, my wife, Julie, holds all this together,” Scott said.The farm has expanded by about 40% over the past few years through a mix of purchases and rental arrangements. It’s also expanded geographically and is now stretched over 34 miles.Crossing into Illinois has moved them into territory that is slightly less aggressive with regard to land prices.“Being stretched out can be a benefit or a curse with regard to weather,” Scott said. “We were lucky and got most all our tillage work done last fall. But with our 60-foot planter, it will still take 12-14 perfect days for us to plant everything.”They plant everything in 20-inch rows. They apply all their own inputs, with the exception of fungicides, which are sometimes flown on. They pride themselves in putting boots on the ground in every field every week to scout for pests and other threats. They utilize variable-rate technology to fine-tune input use.The decision to move away from pre-plant anhydrous to sidedress liquid nitrogen was made years ago. “That is a decision that helps us negotiate years like this when the spring gets compressed,” Scott said. “Typically, when you can put on anhydrous, you can plant and we’d rather be planting.“When things open up in May, it’s going to be full throttle,” he added. “The challenge then will be to stay safe. You’ve got to know when it is time to quit and sometimes that’s hard for me to know.“But my father told me a long time ago that you can’t work all night to try to beat the rain — you’ll just find yourself sleeping when the sun is shining,” he said.Despite the very real challenge of weak commodity prices, Scott Wallis sees the seeds of optimism planted in the crop of family growing about him.“For us, it’s also a very exciting time. In my mind, there’s nothing better than being able to mentor this next generation,” Scott said. “This is what I know: The Wallis family has always been farmers.”DTN readers will be able to follow View From the Cab each Wednesday during the growing and harvesting season.Pamela Smith can be reached at Pamela.smith@dtn.comFollow her on Twitter @PamSmithDTN(AG/ES)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Who Will Have The Biggest Impact On Your Wallet – Obama or Romney?

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market christina ortiz Politify is a recently launched web application that uses IRS and Census data to show a simulation of how President Obama and Mitt Romney’s economic plans will impact areas of the country by zip code, even allowing users to zoom in on their own neighborhood.Last year, during primary season, Politify began as a web app that offered a simple way to decide what presidential primary candidate would be best for voters economically. Now that the dust has cleared and we’re down to two candidates, the app has been upgraded, thanks in large part to grants from UC Berkley and the Sunlight Foundation. Previously, it was a tax calculator, now it shows how each candidate’s economic plan will affect voters in personal, local and national figures.Co-founders Nikita Bier and Jeremy Blalock, along with their team, used IRS and Census data to find how household income is generated and what government services those households use. Based on this information, the web app creates a simulation of how President Obama and Mitt Romney’s economic plans will affect specific areas of the country. To find out the personal impact of the separate plans, potential voters can input their annual income, filing status and other information to see which candidate would benefit them. Locally, users can zoom over their city’s zip codes on a map to see what candidate’s plan benefits their community most. On a national level, graphs of the potential change in deficit and impact on households are shown. Both currently favor the President. (It’s important to note that the maps on the national level, which are almost completely blue, don’t take into account population density.) It’s no surprise that areas of the country that are more affluent benefit from Romney’s plan. However, according to Poltify’s findings, rural areas of the country that usually vote Republican, would benefit most from the Obama plan. The group says they are non-partisan, Bier told The Next Web this week that he describes himself as “radically moderate” and says he has no personal motivation for any particular outcome. However, he hopes that using the web app will encourage people to vote for a candidate based on what’s best for them and their community, rather than focusing on criteria like appearance or morals. Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Tags:#politics#web Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

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Tablet/Laptop Hybrids Are A Great Idea, But Can The HP Envy x2 Live Up To The Promise?

first_imgI think the idea of combining a tablet with a removable keyboard to create tablet/laptop hybrid is a great idea – and the HP Envy X2 makes a brave attempt to combine the two form factors into a viable hybrid. But after using it for several weeks, the truth is that device can’t quite measure up on either side of the equation. Suprisingly, though, the Envy X2 works better as a tablet than as a laptop.(See also HP Envy x2 Tablet/Laptop Combo Cust Across Categories.)I’ve always been a big fan of using multi-function devices instead of carrying multiple specialized devices for particular purposes. I was thrilled with my first smartphone, for example, because I could finally leave my music player and PalmPilot at home. So I was really excited when I first saw the Envy X2, and thrilled when HP sent one over to let me try it out for a while.Great Form Factor, Solid ConstructionThe form factor and hardware construction made me feel even better. Both halves of the 3.1-pound unit come finished in natty brushed aluminum. The tablet portion, which also serves as the screen/lid when attached to the keyboard base, sports an 11.6” touchscreen (1366 x 768 resolution), as well as 2GB of RAM, a 64GB solid-state hard drive (in the $650 base version), an HD webcam on the front and an 8-megapixel camera on the back, plus dual-speaker “Beats Audio” sound. My only issue was the extreme widescreen aspect ratio, which made the unit awkward in some use cases.Connectivity and ports include a propriatary charging connector (boo!), headphone jack, micro SD card slot and Near Field Communications (NFC) wireless connections. Finally, A Real KeyboardThe separate base unit has an honest-to-God laptop-style keyboard: I had no problem touch-typing on it right from the start. That’s critical to this type of device, and frankly better than any of the keyboard covers, add-ons and excuses offered for everything from the Apple iPad to the Microsoft Surface. The keyboard also sports its own USB and HDMI ports and a full-size SD card slot – as well as its own battery that gets used up first when the x2 is is fully assembled.Best of all, the two parts snap together with a solid, easy to use hinge – and you don’t have to worry about turning off the device to go from laptop mode to tablet mode, or vice versa.(See also HP’s New ElitePad Business Tablet Is All About The Accessories.)The Envy x2 I tested runs on Windows 8, which I believe works best in these kinds of small, touchscreen devices. (HP has also released a $480 version running Android called the Slatebook x2.)(See also How Windows 8 Throws Computer Users Under The Bus.) Trading Performance For Battery Life: = A Bad IdeaIn a deliberate move to extend battery life, HP chose to power the Envy x2 with a Intel Atom Z2760 processor running at 1.8GHz. The company claims battery life of up to 10.75 hours for the tablet portion, and up to 19.25 hours for the combined unit (continuous video playback was rated at up to 7 hours for the tablet only, 12.25 hours for the combined unit). In my informal tests, I was never able to use the x2 enough in one day to empty the battery, which I guess is the point. But leaving the machine off for a couple days did seem to drain power.But there’s a steep trade-off here. The Atom processor is simply too wimpy to provide full-fledged laptop performance. I noticed lags and delays constantly just moving around the Windows 8 interface, using simple programs and watching videos. Think netbook, not notebook, and those things faded away for a reason. Using the x2 as a tablet was less bothersome, but still not up to the smoothness and responsiveness standards set by iPads and leading Android tablets.More Netbook Than Notebook?In the end, I could probably live with the tablet-side performance (hardly a ringing endorsement, I know), but there’s no way I could give up a “real” laptop for the x2. And that, right there, turns the Envy x2 into an interesting experiment instead of a useful computing solution. If you still need a real laptop, you might as well get a real tablet. One final note: Earlier this month, HP announced the $800 Split x2, with a 13.3-inch touchscreen and a much more powerful Intel Core processor. This version is not due out until August, but could solve the performance issues. On the other hand, the faster chip will challenge battery life. And with a 13.3-inch screen, that’s going to be one heckuva big tablet!(See also Forget the iPad Mini – Is There Room For An iPad Maxi?)All images by Madeleine Weiss for Readwrite, except Split x2, courtesy of HP. 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now fredric paul Related Posts center_img Tags:#HP#Reviews#tablets#Windows tablets Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo…last_img read more

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No Thank You for Your Email

first_imgHere is an email I received from a company that would like to set appointments for one of my businesses.A very poor attempt at prospectingThe sender begins by reminding me that she previously sent me an email about the same subject, even though I have no recollection of receiving that email; it’s likely I deleted it.The writer suggests that she’s “checking back” to see if I might be interested in an “outbound calling campaign.” She wants to generate leads for my business.She has “a team of appointment setters” who can arrange meetings for my sales reps with interested and qualified prospects.There is so much wrong here it’s hard to describe. But I’ll try.No Phone ChopsThe writer of this email is in the business of setting appointments. In her words, her company uses a “calling campaign” to generate leads. For some reason, they believe that this is what their prospective clients want from them, and she suggests that they are professionals at calling. However, their choice of prospecting methodology betrays the fact that they don’t like the telephone.If they were experts at calling campaigns, why wouldn’t they call?Worse still, she suggests that they can arrange meetings with “qualified prospects” – her words. But she’s done no research to know who I am or what my company does. That makes this email spam. Their definition of “qualified” may not be the same definition you and I might use.If they had the ability to find interested and qualified prospects, why would they choose to send me an email like this one?Wasting Everyone’s TimeThis email is a waste of my time. But that’s not the worst issue. What’s worse is that this salesperson and her company believe this is an effective strategy. They have automated an outbound email campaign in hopes that someone will respond.The last time I received an email like this, I replied and recommended the writer purchase Jeb Blount’s Fanatical Prospecting book. Eventually, I got a note back telling me that there was no salesperson on the other end of the email it was merely automation. Not the best nurturing campaign I’ve ever seen.The one finite, nonrenewable resource you have in your life is time. You are better off targeting your dream clients, nurturing those relationships over time, and developing a business case that compels them to meet with you and to consider using you in the future. You are better off with a calling campaign of your own design; one where you execute and make your calls yourself.last_img read more

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