Future of mobile pay technology: wearables & quality apps

first_imgby: Brian ScottI recently had the honor of participating in the “En route to a cashless 2.0?” session at The Money Event in Las Vegas. This discussion on the future of wearable payments technologies took place during Super Mobility Week, September 9-11, 2014.During the session, I shared what I believe to be the must-haves of future mobile pay technology. Specifically, I outlined the four essential qualities of a desirable mobile payment application. A quality mobile pay app must be:Ubiquitous – Consumers will adopt mobile pay tools that allow them to pay anyone or any merchant regardless of the device.Easy – Only if an application is easier than swiping a card or scanning a barcode can a solution truly deliver value.Rewarding – If consumers don’t get “something else” out of it, they’ll have a hard time abandoning their traditional rewards cards.Secure – With payment data in high black-market demand, consumers are nervous to move money through any application they don’t trust.I can’t over emphasize the importance of an app’s security. It’s essential to remember security has become table stakes for any new technology that deals in personal or financial data. Consumers are becoming increasingly leery of sharing their information, financial or otherwise. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Western influences

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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The Grocer Own Label Awards: how a winner is born

first_imgIt’s oddly compelling viewing: a small number of specially selected men and women in a brightly lit room, answering a barrage of questions. Brows furrow. Faces redden and perspire. There are quips, sighs, giggles, and a fair amount of bickering.But enough about this summer’s Channel 5 reboot of Blind Date. Let’s talk about Blind Test, a two-day trial of endurance held each year by The Grocer as part of its Own Label Food & Drink Awards judging. It’s the expert round of judging, which follows the consumer trials (conducted by our research partner Cambridge Market Research).Professionals from the food & drink industry – development chefs, brand owners, bosses of noteworthy suppliers, journalists and the like – meet to nibble and sip their way through hundreds of food & drink products.There are typically four panels per day, each allotted a number of categories. Samples are served roughly in order of how a day’s dining would pan out. So, a judge can start the day with cereal or yoghurt – but might equally end up with untoasted bread for breakfast.Each product, prepared exactly to the supplier’s instructions, is served without sight of the packaging or a clue about the retailer. Judges mark out of five for such aspects as taste, appearance and odour. Then the pack and rsp are revealed. Our experts score for design and value, among other factors. They record their comments, and then the next mysterious sample is served.So it goes on. And it’s a lot of fun – often entertaining, frequently surprising, and always enlightening. Everyone has passionate and informed opinions. They frequently agree, but sometimes not. Good-natured arguments are not only part ‘n’ parcel, they’re to be expected when people start to feel… let’s call it stangry. It’s the fractiousness one does one’s best to swallow while feeling really rather stuffed and sweaty.For that is the downside of the day: the tightening of one’s slacks around the midriff as frozen pizzas pile on top of coated fish on top of frozen ready meals. It’s a bacchanal of frequently tasty, sometimes dazzling and rarely dull products increasingly offering healthier eating, cleaner packaging, provenance and artistry. Salt crystals sparkle in fatty yellow butter. Light bounces off glazed cheese. Juicy red meats languish alluringly across clean white plates.If one of your products were to get that far in this year’s judging process, you’d be extremely – and rightly – proud. Make it happen. Enter the 2018 Own Label Awards here by 2 October to be in with a chance.last_img read more

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Home loan demand drops as heat comes out of housing market

first_imgThe RBA left interest rates on hold this week at 1.5 per cent. Image: AAP/Dean Lewins. Home loan approval numbers fell in September, according to the ABS. Image: AAP/Dan Himbrechts.Economists had expected them to rise about 2 per cent.The value of home loans written during September also fell.Throughout the month, $32.5 billion in home loans were written — down 3.6 per cent on the month prior. The value of loans for investment housing slid a whopping 6.2 per cent — the largest monthly decline since September 2015 — reflecting the measures introduced earlier this year to clamp down on investor lending.But the number of first home buyers in the market hit its highest level in 4.5 years, due in part to Victorian and New South Wales government incentives. More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus23 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market23 hours ago ART DECO APARTMENT BLOCK FOR SALE HOW MANY BEDROOMS?! CONSTRUCTION WORK GOING STRONG New figures from the ABS show home loan demand dropped in September.HOME loan approvals have taken an unexpected tumble in another sign the heat is coming out of the housing market, according to new figures.The latest housing finance data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics reveals the number of loan approvals fell a seasonally adjusted 2.3 per cent in September.center_img Mortgage Choice CEO John FlavelL.Mortgage Choice chief executive John Flavell said he wasn’t surprised by the figures and expected a further drop in home loan demand for October.“There has been a lot of policy and pricing changes in the investment mortgage market in recent months and this is, understandably, taking a toll on the market,” he said. GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE AMP Capital chief economist Shane Oliver said the data was consistent with further declines in Sydney property prices and a slowdown in the Melbourne housing market.St George Bank senior economist Janu Chan said the data added to the range of indicators such as house prices and auction clearance rates that suggested regulatory measures were having their desired impact.“While this data is volatile month-to-month, it adds to the growing number of signs that housing conditions are cooling,” she said.The Reserve Bank of Australia left interest rates on hold this week at a record low of 1.5 per cent.last_img read more

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Batesville Facade Program Inching Closer To Completion

first_imgFullenkamp’s Sporting Goods and Jim’s Engraving had an awning installed on Wednesday.Construction around downtown Batesville may soon be complete as the façade program is nearing an end.Nine downtown businesses are getting a facelift as part of the façade improvement program.Fullenkamp’s Sporting Goods and Jim’s Engraving both had awnings installed on Wednesday, and remodeling crews are doing trim work and window work.“Customers can enter the front on the Fullenkamp’s side, my side is still in progress,” said building owner Jim Fullenkamp. “I am open for business!”Other businesses impacted by the façade program include: Ison’s Pizza, Strands Salon and Day Spa, Sherman House, A Stitch In Time, French’s Locker, Office Shop, the Tucker Building on Sycamore Street, and the old Knights of Columbus building on Boehringer and Main Street.In September, Batesville Mayor Rick Fledderman hinted at the façade program being complete by the end of November.last_img read more

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Boxing legend Tyson changes diet to increase punching power

first_imgBoxing legend, Mike Tyson, has ditched his vegan diet and is scoffing bison and elk meat to prepare for a ring return. The ex-world heavyweight champ, 54, hopes red meat will restore his stunning punching power. Protein-packed steaks are making him strong again for his comeback against Roy Jones Jr, 51, in Carson, California, on November 28. Tyson said of his vegan diet: “I stopped because of the training and because of what I wanted my body to look like and the strength that I wanted to poses. “I only eat elk and bison — wild stuff — and I’m starting to feel fit.Advertisement Promoted Content10 Risky Jobs Some Women Do2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year20 “The Big Bang Theory” Moments Only A Few Fans Knew AboutThe 90s Was A Fantastic Decade For Fans Of Action MoviesThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?Best Car Manufacturers In The World7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A Vegetarian8 Weird Facts About Coffee That Will Surprise YouWhat Happens When You Eat Eggs Every Single Day?6 Of The Best 90s Shows That Need To Come Back ASAP8 Ways Drones Are Going To Change Our Lives Loading… center_img read also:Anthony Joshua: I’m not afraid of Tyson Fury “I realised the stuff that’s good for other people — like kale, vegetables and blueberries — for me is really poisonous.” Tyson was speaking on the podcast of American comedian Joe Rogan, an amateur hunter. Rogan told Tyson: “I want to give you some of my elk. “I’ve got three commercial freezers full. You can have as much as you want.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Reifer set to take over at Tallawahs: Gleaner  report

first_imgKINGSTON, Jamaica, (CMC) – Former West Indies head coach, Floyd Reifer, is set to take over the top coaching role at the embattled Jamaica Tallawahs for this year’s Caribbean Premier League.According to the Gleaner newspaper here, Barbadian Reifer is one of several changes expected to take place at the Kingston-based franchise for the August 19 to September 26 campaign, following a dismal last season which saw them finish bottom of the standings and miss out on the playoffs.A former West Indies captain, Reifer oversaw the Windies disastrous World Cup campaign last year after replacing Englishman Richard Pybus.“When you have a team that came last in the competition, obviously there are going to be changes, it can’t be business as usual,” chief executive officer, Jeff Miller, said.Under head coach Donovan Miller, Tallawahs managed just two wins in 10 outings in their worst-ever showing in the seven-year-old Twenty20 domestic league.This was in spite of a star-studded lineup which included the likes of superstars Chris Gayle and Andre Russell, along with West Indies all-rounder Rovman Powell and New Zealander Glenn Phillips.Jamaican Miller, who was part of the successful Tallawahs unit of 2016 before moving to St Kitts and Nevis Patriots and then returning home last year, says he was yet to be informed about any changes at the franchise.However, he said he was already in talks with several other franchises and was confident of landing a key position for the upcoming tournament.“I haven’t spoken to CEO Jeff Miller since November of last year,” Miller said.“The last time we spoke, he had asked me to write a report on the team’s performance from last season, which I did and sent to him and the owners, and that was it.“What I can tell you, though, is that I have been in talks with two to three other franchises, and I am almost 99 per cent sure, once we get the green light, that I will be coaching in the CPL this season.”Team manager Andrew Richardson is also expected to leave the Tallawahs, with reigning champions Barbados Tridents the likely destination.Tallawahs have won the CPL twice, in the inaugural year in 2013 and then again in 2016.last_img read more

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Berg is the Word: Trojan fans should lower expectations, for now

first_imgBut that doesn’t happen in a day.  Fans are right that things need to change because the College Football Playoff should be this team’s ultimate goal. But head coach Clay Helton is probably not the person that will bring the Trojans to that level. The program needs to find an offensive line coach who can recruit the position better. The entire team needs to be instilled with a greater regard for discipline. All of these things and many more need to happen for fans’ justified wishes to be met. But let’s call this game what it was: A team that went 5-7 last season lost its true freshman quarterback’s first road game to a decent team in a challenging environment. If I had told USC fans that the team would dominate its second biggest rival and then narrowly lose on the road to a team like BYU, I don’t think they would have the reaction they’re having now. Because this game came in the aftermath of a shockingly enjoyable win that gave fans outlandish expectations, losing to BYU — who actually hung tight with No. 10 Utah through three quarters Week 1 — seems like doomsday. The game was frustrating. Slovis threw three costly interceptions, including a horrible throw into traffic in overtime that was deflected and intercepted, sealing the loss when an incompletion would have given kicker Chase McGrath a field goal opportunity from close range to extend the game. The defense withered in its first day game, appearing gassed to the point of incompetence by the second quarter.  One of my roommates (who knows nothing about football) said hours after the game, “I can’t believe we lost, but this reminds me of the Washington State game from our freshman year [in 2017]. We also had a young quarterback in a tough road game, and we went on to win the Pac-12 Championship. I believe we’ll do that again.” Here’s the truth: These are the types of games that happen to a program of USC’s current caliber. Teams that eke into the Top 25 in the third week lose road games to less talented but still good opponents. Young teams lose on the road. The problem isn’t that USC didn’t play like a national championship contender, it’s that the fans had expectations that it would. Aidan Berg is a junior writing about sports. He is also an associate managing editor for Daily Trojan. His column, “Berg is the Word,” runs every Monday. USC is a historically great program with a blue blood mentality. The University claims 11 national championships, and the NCAA credits it with nine, which is tied for sixth most championships of all time. After dominating throughout the Pete Carroll era in the 2000s, the Reggie Bush-O.J. Mayo athletics scandal set the program back, and the team has spent this entire decade trying to regain that level of glory to no avail. Judging by the fanbase’s expectations, though, you’d think that USC was supposed to be a national title contender every season. Yes, the loss was unacceptable, but it’s also one game. This team has shown more in the past three weeks than it did all of last season. It’s making progress. Instead of a sudden jump to contender status, USC fans should look for the steady improvement that suggests this program can return to the mountaintop in the future.  It’s time for fans to accept that USC is much closer to the middle tier of college football than the elite. A return to the top is always the goal, but it’ll be a lot better for everyone’s sanity if we can all be realistic in the meantime. I’m tired of the massive mood swings the fanbase experiences from week to week and of students acting like they’ve followed this team from birth when it wins and being completely disinterested when it loses. Following the loss, a friend told me that redshirt junior quarterback Matt Fink should be the starter. Seriously. I pressed him about how he could be so stupid as to call for Slovis’ replacement a week after he had one of the best performances in Trojan history. His response? “We lost to BYU. If you didn’t notice.” Trojans fans are incredibly polarized; they’re either happy and boastful about everything, or they whine and complain about all aspects of the program. There is no in-between, and that’s why the Stanford victory wasn’t the all-encompassing triumph many fans made it out to be. It built insane expectations for what this team could accomplish this season, all of which came crashing during the Trojans’ 30-27 overtime loss to BYU in Provo Saturday. The optimism is good-hearted but just as foolish as claiming the defeat is the end of the world.  It’s a lot to expect a team that was just bowl ineligible and lost its starting quarterback for the season to win the conference championship, especially with talented teams like Utah, No. 16 Oregon and No. 22 Washington in the conference. These sort of all-or-nothing reactions destabilize the fanbase, and to some extent, the program, too. It’s good that fans have high aspirations, but they have to understand that it takes time to build a program that fits their view of what USC should be.  USC football’s 45-20 victory over Stanford last week was a dominant effort, a stunning introduction of freshman quarterback Kedon Slovis and maybe the worst thing that could’ve happened to the Trojan fanbase. That last part sounds crazy, but hear me out. Heralded offensive coordinator Graham Harrell was curiously conservative throughout the second half, seeming to call runs on every first and second down and leaving Slovis with some difficult third down situations. And let’s not forget special teams, which frequently gave Slovis the ball with terrible field position.last_img read more

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Wins for Manchester clubs in Champions League action

first_imgSergio Aguero scored a 90th-minute penalty in City’s 2-1 victory away to Borussia Monchengladbach United also won 2-1, as they got past another German team, Wolfsburg, at Old Trafford. Despite manager Brendan Rodgers being under pressure, Liverpool can extend their unbeaten run to five games in all competitions this evening.They’re at home to Swiss side FC Sion in their second Group B fixture in the Europa League.Rodgers says his players will need to be patient for large parts of the game.While, Tottenham want to make it 2 wins out of 2 in Group J when they play away to French league side Monaco.Celtic have Turkish team Fenerbahce at Parkhead in Group A.last_img read more

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Tony Lokko resigns as Brekum Chelsea manager

first_imgBerekum Chelsea Head Coach, Tony Lokko has resigned from post over poor working conditions.The former Amidaus Professionals coach is owed salaries for several months and is fed up with inconsistencies of the club’s administration. He has therefore decided to move on from the Brekum based club.Lokko, who led Brekum Chelsea to a disappointing 12th place finish on the First Capital plus Ghana premier league last season, confirmed his resignation to Joy Sports.Tony Lokko signed a two-year deal with an option of another year in July last year after guiding debutants Amidaus Professionals an 11th place finish of the 2012/2013 Ghana premier league season.Tony Lokko also confirmed he has had a number of lucrative deals from which he is yet to choose from in the coming days.This comes as a double blow for the Brekum based club whose General Manager, Francis Oduro Sarfo, quit last month after an internal dispute with Chief Executive Officer Nana Kwame Nketia. Oduro Sarfo who had worked with the club for four years refused to cite reasons for his resignation.Brekum Chelsea will be looking to beef up their administrative and technical teams while the 2013/2014 Ghana premier league season delay persists.last_img read more

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