Comic genius

first_img Harvard’s collection of comics is vast and varied. It includes the autobiographical comic “The Realist” by Israeli illustrator and comic book artist Asaf Hanuka, published by Archaia (2015); the action-adventure drone comic “RAV” by Mickey Zacchilli, published by Youth in Decline (2014); and “Comix 2000” by various artists, published by L’Association (1999). Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Harvard’s Lamont Library collections contain a number of comics and graphic novels, including popular items from DC and Marvel Comics. The page above, from “Batgirl/Robin Year One,” was published by DC Comics in 2013. For generations, comics, cartoons, and graphic novels have fueled imaginations with their superheroes from far-off galaxies, helped shape political discourse with their biting critiques, and made readers laugh and cry with their poignant reflections on the human condition.Harvard’s own comic collection is vast and varied and includes wordless woodcut picture stories from the early 20th century, popular strips from D.C. and Marvel, and “The Walking Dead,” the black-and-white series that spawned the megahit TV show. The range of the evocative art form will be front and center during a conversation titled “Visual Storytelling: Comics in the Collections” from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Sperry Room at Harvard Divinity School’s Andover Hall. The talk, part of the “Strategic Conversations at Harvard Library” series, will also explore the challenges of collecting and curating comics in an academic setting. Featured speakers are Peter Kuper, a cartoonist, illustrator, and visiting lecturer in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, and Jenny Robb, curator of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum at Ohio State University.In an interview with the Gazette, Kuper, a regular contributor to Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, and Mad magazine, talked about the art, ambition, and importance of comics, along with his recent adaptation of Kafka’s “Metamorphosis,” a project whose original art and ancillary material Houghton Library has acquired with plans to make available for study.GAZETTE: What would you say to those who might think comic books shouldn’t be considered part of a serious university collection?KUPER: These people are mistaken, or simply uninformed on what has taken place in this area of art and literature. I’d like to think there are few people left who maintain this perspective (but as a cartoonist I’ve learned to live with disappointment). The answer is to point them in the direction of the incredible body of work that has been done. Art Spiegelman’s “Maus” is a natural starting point, but there is so much more that has been done since he won a Pulitzer for that book in 1992: Marjane Satrapi’s “Persepolis” (which was also adapted into an Oscar-nominated animated film), Alison Bechdel’s “Fun Home” (which has been adapted into a hit Broadway play), Joe Sacco’s “Footnotes in Gaza,” to name only a few. I’ll be bringing a recommended reading list to my Harvard talk.GAZETTE: What are some of the challenges and barriers faced by those collecting and curating comics in academic settings?KUPER: Cataloging so readers are able to locate the works requires that they are placed in subcategories and not all lumped under the “graphic novel” umbrella. Kafka adaptations should be with other Kafka books — not in humor or jammed in with every other graphic novel, as has been the case with many bookstores and libraries in the past. This may occasionally require buying more than one copy (hint, hint). Comics collections at Harvard If a picture is worth a thousand words, one of Harvard’s comics holdings can speak volumes. The collection “Comix 2000” consists entirely of drawings without text, including this image from an untitled piece by artist Sergio Garcia.center_img A collection of art comics and illustrations from the British independent publishing company Nobrow is part of Harvard’s comics holdings. The image above is from the cover of Nobrow #9, published by Nobrow Press (2014). The eponymous heroine of the British comic “Tank Girl” drives and lives in a tank, and dates a mutant kangaroo named Booga. This page is from “The Cream of Tank Girl” by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin, published by Titan Books (2008). GAZETTE: Is there a distinction to be made between comics and graphic novels?KUPER: If there’s a clear distinction (which there really isn’t), it would only be between comic book “floppies,” which are what superhero comic book magazines tend to be, and something packaged in a book format. This line has been intentionally blurred since the term “graphic novel” has gained greater respectability with book buyers, so it’s slapped on any comic that is done in a long form. Libraries have to be as discerning about graphic novels as they are about literature. There is genre material that is geared towards kids and young adults and other literary examples covering politics, autobiography, history, etc., that are aimed at adults. The biggest disservice is to treat comics as one form and isolate it all together.GAZETTE: What is the role of comics and graphic novels in helping shape our culture? And what can they do that other media or art forms can’t?KUPER: We are a very visually literate society and comics only encourage and increase that literacy. Unlike viewing a movie, which is a more passive act, comics create an intimate relationship between artist and audience that is very participatory. A comic requires that the reader make visual connections and follow a story from panel to panel, connecting the dots and deciding what takes place between panels. Comics are a unique language and can even function without words, telling a story through images alone. In this way, they can dismantle language barriers without sacrificing a complex story.GAZETTE: As a political cartoonist, why do you think comics and graphic novels are such an effective tool for political and social commentary?KUPER: One of the beauties of the form is the relationship between image and text. Comics allow the artist to show conflicting/ironic imagery to make a clear point. The caption can say, “They were overjoyed with the news,” while showing an image of crying people. It also can make information more accessible. In “Maus,” to have simple drawings of mice representing the Jews and cats representing Nazis allowed readers to engage with the subject and see themselves in the drawings. It was deceptively light in its visuals and gave readers a way to enter and understand the horrors of the Holocaust and its impact on the author and his subjects.GAZETTE: What inspired you to adapt books such as Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” and Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” to graphic novels?KUPER: With “The Jungle,” it was opportunity. A publisher was doing a line of “classics illustrated” and gave me a chance to do something longer form and in full color. This was at a time (1990) when bookstores and libraries were not carrying graphic novels. I saw this as a way to demonstrate the possibilities of the form with material that had been important to me growing up and hopefully break through to a non-comic-reading public. It had great limitations since I was adapting a 350-plus-page book into a 48-page graphic novel (the format the publisher had set), but it did reach a wider audience and began the process of opening doors to libraries and bookstores.With “The Metamorphosis,” my adaptation was longer than Kafka’s story. I had previously adapted nine of his short stories in a collection called “Give it Up!” and loved the experience, so “The Metamorphosis” was a natural follow-up. Kafka’s writing acted as an anchor that allowed me to experiment with the art form and really demonstrate ways of storytelling that only could be done in comics. In one passage, in order to follow the text, the reader has to turn the book around 360 degrees, which is in conjunction with visuals following Gregor Samsa as he climbs the walls. I was also able to bring a style to the story that while reflecting German Expressionist art also had a comical quality that brought out the dark humor in Kafka’s writing.last_img read more

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1,980 accepted to the Class of 2024

first_imgRegular-action decisions were sent out Thursday evening to applicants to Harvard College’s Class of 2024, with 1,980 officially admitted. The total number of applications was 40,248.“From their applications it is clear that the Class of 2024 will bring to Harvard extraordinary talents, ideas, backgrounds, and life experiences,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “We look forward to giving them a preview of what Harvard College has to offer during our Virtual Visitas program and getting to know them over the next four years.”This year’s admitted class hails from every state and from 92 countries. International students make up 10.8 percent of the class, and 8.8 percent are U.S. dual citizens. Twenty-two percent come from Middle Atlantic States, 19.7 percent from the South, 17.4 percent from New England, 16.9 percent from the Western and Mountain States, 11.9 percent from the Midwest, and 12 percent from the U.S territories and abroad.Based on projections, more than half of the class will receive need-based grants, allowing families to pay an average of $12,000 annually. Harvard will require no contribution from nearly 23 percent of the families, representing those with annual incomes below $65,000. The students in this group will also receive $2,000 start-up grants to help with move-in costs and other expenses incurred in making the transition to College.In addition, earlier this month, Harvard announced it would further expand its financial aid program by eliminating from aid awards the summer work expectation beginning in the 2020–21 academic year. Students still will be expected to contribute $3,500 through term-time work to meet their estimated personal expenses. Based on projections, more than half of the Class of 2024 will receive need-based grants, allowing families to pay an average of $12,000 annually. Harvard will require no contribution from nearly 23 percent of the families. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is investing an estimated $2 million to fund the program expansion. The goal is to provide aided students with more flexibility to pursue academic, public service, or internship opportunities during the summer. Since launching the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative in 2005, the University has awarded more than $2 billion in grants to undergraduates. Harvard’s budget for the group has increased more than 148 percent, from $80 million in 2005 to more than $200 million in 2019.This year, an estimated 380 admitted students, or about 19 percent, qualified for federal Pell grants, typically awarded to students from lower-income backgrounds, up from 340, or about 17 percent, last year. First-generation students represent 19.4 percent of the class, compared with 16.4 percent in 2019.“The College continues to invest in its core value of providing access to a Harvard education to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds, and we are pleased that our generous, need-based financial aid program is continuing to inspire applicants to apply,” said Jake Kaufmann, Griffin Director of Financial Aid. “Additionally, all aided students now have the added benefit of Harvard’s elimination of the summer work expectation, which we hope allows them to pursue summer internships, research, or public-service opportunities.”At Harvard, families with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay no more than 10 percent of their annual income. Loans are not required of students, and families who make more than $150,000 are generally eligible for aid on a sliding scale, depending on their particular circumstances, such as multiple children in college or unusual medical or other essential expenses.The Class of 2024 reflects the increasing diversity of the College’s applicants, with 14.8 percent identifying as African American/black, 24.5 percent as Asian American, 12.7 percent as Latinx, 1.8 percent as Native American, and 0.4 percent as native Hawaiian. Women account for more than half, 51.6 percent, of all those accepted to the class.In recent years, Harvard has increased its efforts to recruit individuals who have served in the U.S. military, working with groups affiliated with the Defense Department and joining the Service to School’s VetLink program in 2017. Thirteen veterans were admitted to this year’s class, and 47 students expressed interest in ROTC, an increase from six veterans and 41 potential ROTC candidates last year.“We are thrilled that more military veterans are applying to and enrolling in the College than at any time in recent decades,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.Harvard recently decided to cancel its on-site programming for Visitas, its admitted student weekend, which had been scheduled for April 18‒20. Instead, students are invited to participate in a “Virtual Visitas” the entire month of April. The program will give class members a chance to connect with students, faculty, and leadership online. Members of the Harvard community are encouraged to share videos on social media and use the hashtag #Visitas2020 to welcome next year’s new class.Staff members of the Griffin Financial Aid office will be available to speak with students and their families starting now and through the month of April to help them as they make their final college choices.Students will have until May 1 to reply.last_img read more

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Trade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021

first_imgTrade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):LNG developers “need to brace themselves for a continued glut” in world gas markets with rising supplies potentially outpacing demand growth for another two years, the International Gas Union said in an April 27 outlook.“This will mean continued depressed prices,” said the International Gas Union, or IGU. “This is then likely followed by a period of recovery, with renewed uncertainty around the middle of the decade.”The 42.5 million tonnes per annum of worldwide liquefaction capacity that came online in 2019 is expected to extend the oversupply into the mid- to late 2020s, significantly longer than the forecast issued just a year ago by the IGU, which represents all sectors in the gas value chain. If Qatar moves forward with its North Field LNG expansion, which the industry group described as one of the world’s most cost-competitive projects, another 49 mtpa of supply could come online between 2024 and 2027, causing the global glut to last another couple of years.The market was oversupplied even before coronavirus pandemic began hitting world demand, with the global liquefaction capacity reaching about 430.5 mtpa by the end of 2019, the IGU reported. LNG prices slumped as rising supplies, especially from the U.S., met weaker-than-expected demand in a mild winter. But the pandemic made the situation worse as lockdowns imposed by world governments to control the spread of the coronavirus hit commercial and industrial demand for gas.New additions of LNG production capacity in 2020 are expected to reach 24.35 mtpa. In the U.S., new liquefaction units are in the late stages of commissioning at the Freeport LNG Development LP facility in Texas, Kinder Morgan Inc.’s Elba Island LNG plant in Georgia, and the Sempra Energy-led Cameron LNG terminal in Louisiana.“The current market environment lowers the expectations of seeing a recovery in prices any time before the coming winter,” the IGU reported.[Corey Paul]More ($): LNG glut to persist years longer than previously thought, industry group sayslast_img read more

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Bolivia’s Navy Expected to Combat Narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca

first_imgIn 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA). By Dialogo March 09, 2015 However, in recent months Peruvian security forces have made it more difficult for drug trafficking groups to use narco-planes by destroying least 60 clandestine landing strips used by the traffickers, including many in the VRAEM. Citing security reasons, Vice Adm. Calla didn’t reveal where or precisely when the unit would be deployed, but said the unit would be mobile so it could surprise narcotraffickers. “We have detected a lot of activity, not just drug trafficking, but also smuggling on Lake Titicaca, so the Bolivian Navy is establishing a specific unit that will be under the jurisdiction of the Fourth Naval District.” Bolivia has also made progress in the fight against narcotrafficking and drug cultivation. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia by plane before routing the drugs to Central America, North America, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. The announcement occurred just weeks after Bolivia and Peru started working jointly against narcotrafficking and other criminal activities along their shared border. The countries are using a satellite system to detect narcotic shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations, around the clock. The nations’ Navies, Air Forces, and counter-narcotics police forces work together to interdict and search suspicious vessels. In 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA). The Andean nations are continuing to work together on land to combat narcotrafficking and the cultivation of coca – the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Each country’s Military and police forces are concentrating their eradication of coca crop efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and in Peru’s Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. In March, Bolivia’s Navy is expected to launch a special unit to assist Bolivia’s Special Anti-Drug Force (FELCN) in combating narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca, Vice Admiral Waldo Calla, the commander of the Navy, said recently. “We have detected a lot of activity, not just drug trafficking, but also smuggling on Lake Titicaca, so the Bolivian Navy is establishing a specific unit that will be under the jurisdiction of the Fourth Naval District.” The announcement occurred just weeks after Bolivia and Peru started working jointly against narcotrafficking and other criminal activities along their shared border. The countries are using a satellite system to detect narcotic shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations, around the clock. The nations’ Navies, Air Forces, and counter-narcotics police forces work together to interdict and search suspicious vessels. Bolivia has also made progress in the fight against narcotrafficking and drug cultivation. However, in recent months Peruvian security forces have made it more difficult for drug trafficking groups to use narco-planes by destroying least 60 clandestine landing strips used by the traffickers, including many in the VRAEM. In March, Bolivia’s Navy is expected to launch a special unit to assist Bolivia’s Special Anti-Drug Force (FELCN) in combating narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca, Vice Admiral Waldo Calla, the commander of the Navy, said recently. Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares since 2010, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18, 2014. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia by plane before routing the drugs to Central America, North America, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. The Andean nations are continuing to work together on land to combat narcotrafficking and the cultivation of coca – the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Each country’s Military and police forces are concentrating their eradication of coca crop efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and in Peru’s Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. Citing security reasons, Vice Adm. Calla didn’t reveal where or precisely when the unit would be deployed, but said the unit would be mobile so it could surprise narcotraffickers. Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares since 2010, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18, 2014.last_img read more

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Suspect Gets Plea Deal in Fatal Home Invasion

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A man on trial for his role in a deadly Flanders home invasion struck a plea deal after a judge ruled that a prosecutor improperly withheld evidence from the defense, resulting in the prosecutors firing.Messiah Booker pleaded guilty Tuesday at Suffolk County court to a charge of attempted burglary and a second-degree murder charge was dropped in exchange for his plea. Assistant District Attorney Glenn Kurtzrock was fired later the same day.“The conduct of the assigned prosecutor in this case was inexcusable resulting in further pain to the family of Demitri Hampton, and our prosecutors work tirelessly to make sure that does not happen,” Robert Clifford, a spokesman for Suffolk County District Attorney Thomas Spota said. “Unfortunately in this case, we failed with a devastating result. The District Attorney has asked for this prosecutor’s resignation and he has complied.”Prosecutors had alleged that Booker was involved in the shooting death of Demitri Hampton in the victim’s Priscilla Avenue home at 3:15 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 27, 2013.Three other suspects were arrested in 2015 for their roles in the case, police have said. Michael Parrish of Coram, Danielle Hall of Calverton and Corry Wallace of Riverhead have all pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder and burglary charges. They are awaiting trial.Booker is scheduled to be sentenced June 9 before Judge John Collins. He had faced up to 25 years to life, if convicted of murder.last_img read more

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Matz concerned payday rule changes threaten credit unions affordable PALs

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Proposed changes to payday lending rules could prevent credit unions from making affordable payday alternative loans (PALs), National Credit Union Administration Chair Debbie Matz said Monday.Speaking at the Defense Credit Union Council’s Overseas Subcouncil in Dublin, Matz discussed the proposals, as well as a number of other credit union issues.The changes Matz referred to include those being considered by U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), which would cap military annual percentage rate (APR) at 36%, a number that includes fees.“We have done the math and found that when fees are included, many credit unions’ short-term loans would exceed the proposed 36% military APR limit,” Matz said.The NCUA leader underscored, “Unfortunately, this proposed rule would deny access to affordable alternatives to predatory payday loans.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Indonesia reduces deforestation rate as researchers urge caution

first_imgHowever, WRI Indonesia senior manager for climate and forests Arief Wijaya cautioned that clouds and haze may have obscured some deforestation incidents that happened between October and November 2019, which could mean the actual level of forest loss is higher.“Because of this, there is the possibility that [the effects of] fires in 2019 will pick up in […] 2020,” Arief said recently, noting that the phenomenon also occurred in 2015 and became discernible the following year.Indonesia’s Environment and Forestry Minister Siti Nurbaya Bakar said in late April that the government would continue to prioritize its mitigation of land and forest fires at a time when resources are stretched due to the COVID-19 outbreak.Siti said the special task force on the ground would continue its hard work to prevent any threat of fires this year, especially in regions prone to catching fire.“As per the President’s instructions, even amid these trying times due to COVID-19, we mustn’t allow our priority services to be disrupted,” she said during a virtual discussion.According to a recent study by the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG), Indonesia is approaching the peak of the dry season in June and July, particularly in the provinces of Riau, South Sumatra, Jambi, Central Kalimantan, North Kalimantan and East Kalimantan.According to the BRG’s observations between April and May, Riau, Jambi and South Sumatra are the three provinces that are prone to fires igniting on dried peatland.The positive trend in Indonesia’s efforts to bring down the rate of deforestation is a culmination of state efforts to respond to seething criticism from neighboring countries affected by choking transboundary haze in 2015 and 2016.The government is also set to receive a US$56 million grant from Norway in June this year, as the first payment for Indonesia’s successful reduction in deforestation and carbon emissions under the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) cooperation scheme.“It’s fair to say Indonesia had helped [bring] primary cover loss down [for the last] three years at least in some part due to the government’s effort to support that,” WRI senior research fellow Frances Seymour said.Indonesia accounts for around 2 percent of total global forest cover, roughly equivalent to 92 million ha.Other countries like Brazil and the DRC still showed increased deforestation due to agricultural expansion and other land-use conversions.“If governments put in place good policies and enforce the law, forest loss goes down. But, if the government relaxes restrictions on burning and signals interest and intent to clear indigenous territory for exploitation, forest loss goes up,” Seymour said.In total, the world lost 11.9 million ha of tree cover in 2019.“Nearly a third of that loss or 3.8 million hectares was the primary forest equivalent of losing one football pitch of rainforest every six seconds for the entire year,” WRI forest program global director Rod Taylor said at the report’s launch.Meanwhile, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the United Nations Environment Program recently released a three-decade joint review of the global rate of deforestation.According to the 2020 State of the World’s Forests (SOFO) report, it is estimated that around 420 million ha of forest have been lost through conversion to other land uses since 1990, although the rate has decreased recently.From 2010 to 2015, the world lost 12 million ha of forest per year to deforestation, while between 2015 and 2020 the annual rate of deforestation was at 10 million ha per year.Between 2000 to 2010, this figure stood at 15 million ha, and between 1990 and 2000, some 16 million ha of forest was lost to deforestation every year.Though up to 93 percent of the world’s forests can naturally regenerate, they were not able to keep up with the rate of deforestation, with annual agricultural expansion rising from 8 million ha between 1990 and 2000 to 10 million ha (2000-2010), 7 million ha (2010-2015) and 5 million ha (2015-2020) per year.Topics : Indonesia has offered a glimpse of hope for the environment, with its rate of deforestation having decreased for a third year in a row as a result of the government’s response to the devastating 2015-2016 fire crisis, even as global deforestation continues apace.However, environmental researchers remain cautious about the actual level of forest cover loss in the country as the full impact of fires in 2019 might have been obscured by haze and bad weather conditions.Despite experiencing the third-highest rate of deforestation in the world, primary forest loss in Indonesia dropped significantly last year, hitting its lowest figures since 2003, according to the recently launched Global Forest Watch report. Indonesia lost 324,000 hectares of primary forest, just behind Brazil (1.36 million ha) and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (475,000 ha), based on satellite data collated by the University of Maryland and released by the World Resources Institute (WRI) in its report.Researchers have attributed this decline in forest loss to successful forest protection policies that were put in place after Indonesia’s unprecedented 2015-2016 haze and fire crisis, which led to the loss of 929,000 ha of forest cover in 2015 – an all-time high.“This decrease comes despite an intense fire season in 2019, which in previous years [would have] resulted in large areas of primary forest loss,” said the Global Forest Watch’s Geographic Information System research manager, Elizabeth Goldman. “A number of policies in Indonesia have contributed to this positive story.”She said contributing factors included increased law enforcement against illegal forest fires and land clearing, a moratorium on new oil palm plantations, Papua and West Papua governors’ initiative to protect their forest cover and the establishment of the Peatland Restoration Agency (BRG).last_img read more

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Bilic demands 100% focus from Ajayi Ahead Leeds clash

first_img West Bromwich and Barnsley play a 1-1 draw few days back Leeds’ pulsating 5-4 win over Birmingham on Sunday was their first in four games. But Bilic says Marcelo Bielsa’s side have, like Albion, been galvanised by suffering semi-final play-off agony last season. “They experienced something quite painful last year, they lost in the worst possible way,” Bilic said. “We did the same last season, you are there and then we lost it in the play-offs. “They learn from their mistakes, you are double aware, double focused and that’s definitely one of the reasons we are there with them and they with us.” Read AlsoRangers fans rave about Joe Aribo following Celtic win Leeds, who hope to have striker Patrick Bamford fit again, have not won at The Hawthorns since 2002 and have lost on their past three visits, including a 4-1 defeat last season, a record Ajayi and his teammates will like to see continue. Loading… Super Eagles and West Brom defensive midfielder Semi Ajayi is expected to maintain 100% focus as the Championship side host Leeds United on New Year eve. Although the Nigerian has been pulling weight and doing his best in recent matches, appreciative WestBrom boss Slaven Bilic insists Ajayi and his teammates should not lose focus noting that momentary loss of focus could spell doom for the team who currently occupy the second position below Championship table toppers Leeds United Leeds have taken over at the top of the table on goal difference, with West Brom failing to win any of their past three matches. Both sides still have a healthy nine-point lead over third-placed Fulham but, after good winning runs throughout November, neither have been consistent in recent weeks. “The league is very long and you know you cannot lose the focus because it happens every year,” Bilic said at his pre-match press conference. “If you lose the focus, commitment or quality – four or five per cent – then you are gone. “Sometimes you can get lucky, but normally you pay the price for that.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way10 Legendary Movies To Learn History FromEverything You Need To Know About Asteroid ArmageddonBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made7 Theories About The Death Of Our Universe6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too MuchBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By Odeith9 Iconic Roles That Got Rejected By World Famous Actorslast_img read more

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Aqua Trojans Roll On With Win Over Knights

first_imgThe AquaTrojans of SDMS are 7-0 following their meet Monday night against South Dearborn Middle School in Aurora. The girls won 103-50 and the boys won 85-49. Individual winners include:Grace Crane-200 Freestyle, 100 Breaststroke; Troy Shumate-200 Freestyle, 100 Breaststroke; Jackson Ketcham-50 Freestyle, 400 Freestyle; Mackenzie Schantz-50 Butterfly, 400 Freestyle; Jacob Weber-50 Butterfly, 100 backstroke; Noah Arnold-100 Freestyle; and Hannah Weber-100 BackSDMS won all 4 relays and finished the year only losing 5 relays. Saturday is the last test for an undefeated season as they travel to Richmond for the Richmond Invitational. Wish all the SDMS swimmers good luck!!!Courtesy of AquaTrojans Coach Brandon Lovelesslast_img read more

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Dodge City championship chases to the critical stage on Saturday

first_imgBy Lonnie WheatleyDODGE CITY, Kan. – It’s getting down to the nitty gritty at Dodge City Raceway Park.And Saturday’s championship chase tilt is critical in points chases for each of the Precise Racing Products DCRP Sprint Cars, IMCA Modifieds, IMCA SportMods, IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars and IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks.Saturday’s racing action goes green at 7:30 p.m.Only two more nights of championship chase action remain after Saturday’s event including the Saturday, Sept. 1 Labor Day Weekend special and then the sixth annual Jerry Soderberg Memo­rial Championship event on Sept. 15.General admission for Saturday’s championship chase action at Dodge City is $15 with children 11 and under admitted free when accompanied by an adult.last_img read more

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