DANIEL TO PLAY THE ‘STRICTLY GAME’ TO SURVIVE ON BBC SHOW

first_imgDaniel O’Donnell has said he will keep his cards closer to his chestfrom BBC bosses after he was handed the dance he didn’t want lastweekend on Strictly Come Dancing.Although the Kincasslagh man came sailing through the show, the 53 yearold star says he is going to play it cuter with TV producers.“I’ll never tell the truth again because the Charleston was the firstdance I got after I told them I wasn’t looking forward to it,” he toldHighland Radio. Daniel said his dance partner Kristina Rihanoff was in complete shockwhen their name was called out first to go through in Sunday night’sresults show.“Kristina has said to me that they always put her through last. Whenour names were called out first, she just couldn’t believe it.“She said to me ‘they must love you on the BBC because they didn’tleave it until last. But we know it’s in no particular order,” headdd.He admitted that he was ‘panting like a racehorse’ when he finishedlast Saturday night’s show. “I was completely out of breath. I couldn’t speak. I was just panting,I was like a horse after doing Becher’s Brook and all the things inthe Grand National,” he said.Daniel said he was heartbroken to see former Olympic sprinter IwanThomas and partner Ola Jordan voted off the show.“That is the rough old part of the show. Iwan was the fit person I metand we build up a friendship. We will certainly keep in touch with alot of the people we met on the show,” he added.But despite his constant work on the dance floor, Daniel admits thathe is not finding the dancing any easier.“Every week I think I’m never going to be able to do this. And thenKristina help me and we dance through it. “Some of them (the other contestants) are fantastic and are adaptingvery well. I’m pulling along in the middle but I might get better. Butwhen I’m out in the floor Im enjoying it,” he added.DANIEL TO PLAY THE ‘STRICTLY GAME’ TO SURVIVE ON BBC SHOW was last modified: October 5th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BBCdaniel o’donnelldonegalStrictly Come Dancinglast_img read more

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CELTIC BEAT RANGERS TO GO EIGHT POINTS CLEAR

first_imgGary Hooper grabbed a double as Celtic strengthened their grasp on top spot in the Clydesdale Bank Premier League with a 3-0 win over Rangers.Kris Commons was also on target once again in the Old Firm derby as the Hoops moved eight points clear at the summit.The victory puts them beyond the reach of Rangers for now, regardless of the outcome of their two games in hand. El-Hadji Diouf – who spat on a Celtic fan on his last visit to Parkhead in 2003 – was jeered every time he touched the ball but it was Bartley who picked up the first booking after just three minutes for a challenge on Scott Brown.Celtic took the lead after 17 minutes when Commons supplied the pass for Hooper and he beat David Weir for pace before rifling past Allan McGregor.Jelavic tried to pull a goal back quickly but could only look on in frustration as he hooked well over the crossbar. Celtic increased their lead after 28 minutes when Hooper claimed his second of the day.Samaras started the move by releasing Emilio Izaguirre out on the left and he whipped a great ball to the feet of Hooper to stab home. Referee Iain Brines produced his yellow card again as Diouf and Beram Kayal were both cautioned in the aftermath of the celebrations.Naismith appeared to be struggling and was replaced by Lafferty at the break.Rangers tried to haul themselves back into the game and Jelavic nodded just wide from a Steven Davis cross but only last gasp defending prevented them from falling further behind when Sasa Papac cleared Brown’s header off the line.At the other end, Diouf tried to lob Fraser Forster but the Hoops goalkeeper was up to the challenge.Celtic made a change of their own when Kayal was swapped for Ki Sung-yeung, before Madjid Bougherra was booked for dissent. Diouf was withdrawn with just over 20 minutes to go to the delight of the Celtic fans as Rangers threw David Healy into the action in search of a goal.But there was no way back for the Scottish champions when Celtic netted their third after 70 minutes.Hooper had been impressive and turned provider for Commons who sent a swerving effort past McGregor into the back of the net.The Rangers goalkeeper then did well to block a ferocious strike from Ki but by then the damage was well and truly done. CELTIC BEAT RANGERS TO GO EIGHT POINTS CLEAR was last modified: February 21st, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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UCLA notes: CB Cassel to start vs. Cal

first_imgUCLA senior cornerback Marcus Cassel never thought the coaches lost confidence in him in past seasons, but he couldn’t say the same about himself. That is the biggest change in Cassel, who said Tuesday his confidence remains high even after watching redshirt freshman Byron Velega play much of the fourth quarter against Washington. Punting inconsistencies: After having Chris Kluwe for two seasons, the Bruins are leaning on redshirt freshman Aaron Perez for punting duties, and are experiencing the growing pains associated with inexperience. Perez had a 13-yard shank against Washington, but followed with a 50-yarder downed at the 2. He is averaging 39 yards on 16 punts, with a net 37.6-yard average. “I’d like for him to be at a bigger average,” Dorrell said. “I’d like him to be at 42 yards, and net at 38 yards, and we’re not quite there yet. He’s a young player that’s working his way through this experience. He’s getting better and better. Experience takes care of a lot of things, and the more he punts in game-like situations, the better he’ll be.” Odds and ends: Cal left tackle Andrew Cameron, a second-year starter, is done for the year after tearing a knee ligament against Arizona. Junior Scott Smith will make his third career start in Cameron’s place. … After a dismal week of practice against Washington, Dorrell said “you could tell there’s a different direction of intensity that’s going on right now” in regards to UCLA’s first day of practice in preparation for Cal. Brian Dohn, (818) 713-3607 brian.dohn@dailynews.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! And the coaching staff’s confidence in Cassel is intact, as well, which is why Bruins coach Karl Dorrell said Cassel will start Saturday when No. 20 UCLA hosts No. 10 California. “Cassel played well,” Dorrell said. “He had nine tackles. I wouldn’t read into anything that he’s going to lose his starting job, or we lost confidence in him. He’s still going to start, and Velega is still going to play as his backup.” center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 Opponents have thrown Cassel’s way more often than to the other side of the field, but he said that is a product of his style. “I play a lot of press coverage, and that’s what teams are going to do,” Cassel said. “I’m ready for that. That’s not a problem. Sometimes they’re going to complete some of those, and the next time it comes up, knock it down. Just keep on going.” Dorrell added UCLA will continue to use Cassel and Velega at right corner, and starter Trey Brown and Rodney Van at left corner. “I have a lot of confidence in all four of those,” Dorrell said. “(Velega) has very good cover skills and he’s fearless in coming up and making plays on the line of scrimmage. That’s how we’re building all the corners. They’re on an island. “They’re going to have to make plays on their own and they’re going to have to come up and do some great things. All four of those guys really have the same mind-set when they play.” last_img read more

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Women’s Tennis Signs Reifeis For 2016-17

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa – The Drake Universtiy women’s tennis team has signed high school standout Claire Reifeis (Indianapolis, Ind) to a National Letter of Intent for the 2016-17 season, head coach Sadhaf Pervez announced Monday, Nov. 16.”Claire is going to have an immediate impact in our singles and doubles lineup. A lot of girls come into college tennis just knowing how to play singles and not doubles and that is where Claire will have a huge advantage her freshman year,” said Pervez. “Claire is also an amazing student to go with her tennis abilities. She fits the mold of a Drake student-athlete and we are very excited for Claire to join our program next fall.”Reifeis is tabbed the No. 1 player in the Indiana and is rated as a four-star prospect byTennisRecruiting.net. She has garnered first all-state honors the last three seasons with a combined 75-9 record, highlighted by leading North Central to a second place team finish in 2014. Reifeis also has been named an academic all-state selection the previous three years.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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What causes a concussion? Stanford scientists search for clues

first_imgSTANFORD — Stanford researchers have made headway in understanding the causes of concussions that could lead to improvements in helmet design and onsite detection at sporting events.In a study published in Physical Review Letters the bioengineers found concussions and other mild head injuries seem to occur when an area deep in the brain shakes more rapidly and intensely than surrounding parts of the organ. “We are pinpointing the weak point in the brain during impact with the biomechanical …last_img read more

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16 June 1976: the day Hector Pieterson died

first_img“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele. The police were ordered to shoot.”(Image: South African History Online)Brand South Africa reporterThese are the words of Sam Nzima, recalling the events of 16 June 1976, when over 500 people were killed as they protested over the imposition of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in township schools.Nzima’s photograph of the dying Hector Pieterson being carried by a fellow student was published around the world, and came to represent the anger and tragedy of a day that changed the course of South African history, sparking months of clashes between police, schoolchildren and protesters.Hector, 12, was one of the first casualties of what came to be known as the Soweto Uprising.Hastings: June 16’s forgotten heroFifteen-year-old Hastings Ndlovu was probably shot before Hector Pieterson, although he died later. But no photographer was on hand to record the moment.Another boy, Hastings Ndlovu, is believed to have been the first child to be shot on that fateful day. But Nzima, a photographer for Johannesburg newspaper The World, was on the spot when Mbuyisa Makhubo picked Hector up and, together with Hector’s sister Antoinette, ran towards a press car, into which he was bundled taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.“I was the only photographer there at the time”, Nzima says. “Other photographers came when they heard shots.”A few months after that, The World was banned and shut down.Hector Pieterson MuseumWhen you visit the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West, Soweto, you’ll see Nzima’s legendary photograph showing the unconscious Hector being carried by Makhubo, with Hector’s sister – now Antoinette Sithole – running alongside.You might also get to see Antoinette herself, who works at the museum, giving guided tours.But don’t expect to come away with an image of what Hector looked like – the family do not have a single snapshot of their famous son.Soon after 16 June, journalists approached the Pieterson family for pictures of Hector. Photographs were handed over with the promise they would be returned – but they weren’t. Thirty years later, the search for the photographs continues.The museum, which opened on 16 June 2002, follows the chronology of the build-up to 16 June 1976, starting with the way tensions were building among Soweto’s school children, with one school after another going out on strike.The museum stands two blocks from where Hector was shot and fell, on the corner of Moema and Vilakazi Streets in Orlando West, Soweto. There are houses on all four corners of that intersection, so the museum is located up the road in Kumalo Street.Hector’s mother, Dorothy Molefi, lives in nearby Meadowlands. “I’m very proud that there’s a museum for Hector, and that children are learning about him in history,” she says. “We still visit his grave every few months.”Hector’s father died not long before the opening of the museum.The museum is an impressive red-brick building, two storeys high, with irregularly shaped windows in a haphazard pattern. The community asked that the building blend in with the dwellings around it – small red-brick, semi-detached houses with iron roofs.Walking through the large rust-red door, the immediate impression is of a cathedral, with its double volume ceiling, tall thin windows, stripped wood floors, concrete columns and tall red-brick walls.The wall opposite the door is filled with an enlarged photograph of marching children, with banners and posters protesting the use of Afrikaans in township schools.The musuem’s chief curator, Ali Hlongwane, is sensitive to the differing accounts of why that day’s protests exploded the way they did.There is some debate about the extent to which several student organisations, in particular the South African Students Organisation and the South Africa Students Movement, were involved in the lead-up to the uprising. The role of the liberation movements – the African National Congress and the Pan Africanist Congress – is also unclear.“The re-representation of the story is an ongoing process”, says Hlongwane; the museum continues to record people’s stories and add to its displays.“We may get someone come into the museum, look at the photograph, and say: ‘This is me’, or ‘I know that face’. We will then record and archive their experiences”, Hlongwane explains.There seems no doubt about the role of various cultural activists in building solidarity among the youth, inspired by Black Consciousness philosophy. Writers, poets, dancers, singers and painters captured the injustice of apartheid, and some of these works are on display.Build-up to 16 JuneBut it is generally agreed that tensions in schools had been growing from February 1976, when two teachers at the Meadowlands Tswana School Board were dismissed for their refusal to teach in Afrikaans.Students and teachers throughout Soweto echoed this sentiment, and the African Teachers’ Association of South Africa presented a memorandum to this effect to the Education Department. From mid-May around a dozen schools went on strike, and several students refused to write mid-year exams.On 16 June, students from three schools – Belle Higher Primary, Phefeni Junior Secondary and Morris Isaacson High – planned to march from their schools to the Orlando Stadium, about a kilometre from the museum, to hold a meeting. But before they got to where the museum stands today the police met them, in Moema Street.There are conflicting accounts of who gave the first command to shoot, but soon children were turning and running in all directions, leaving some children lying wounded on the road – among them Hector Pieterson and Hastings Ndlovu.A major part of the museum’s presentation of the story of the day is done through TV monitors, recording the world’s footage of the events, as South Africa had only just got television. Text panels scattered throughout the museum give eye-witness accounts and background viewpoints.Inside the museumThe museum is arranged in a series of interleading spaces joined by ramps, moving you closer to Nzima’s photograph – enlarged and waiting for you at the top of the second ramp.The interior is dominated by red brick walls, with some areas plastered and painted white and black, and others left in grey concrete. Large square windows at the top of the ramps give views of the suburb’s significant sites: Orlando Stadium, the Orlando Police Station, Moema Street, and several schools. Combined with black steel banisters and high ceilings, the effect is stunning.One of the few walled-in rooms in the museum is the Death Register, the room that records the names of the children who died over the period from June 1976 to the end of 1977.But the day, and the events that followed, had positive consequences. Thousands of students joined the broader liberation movement, ensuring that resistance to apartheid was maintained and escalated. International solidarity movements added to pressure on the apartheid government.The use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction was dropped. More schools and a teacher training college were built in Soweto. Teachers were given in-service training, and encouraged to upgrade their qualifications by being given study grants.And most importantly, urban blacks were given permanent resident status in South Africa. Before, they had been considered “temporary sojourners” with permanent residence only in the designated homelands, often inferior pieces of land far away from industrial centres and jobs.Like the Apartheid Museum at Johannesburg’s Gold Reef City, this much smaller museum – the first museum in Soweto – has a simplicity which allows the drama of the story to have maximum impact.What became of them?What became of some of the chief protagonists of 16 June 1976?Sam NzimaNzima, who took six sequence shots of 12-year-old Pieterson in those brief moments, left Johannesburg for Limpopo – then the northern Transvaal – about a year later, when it became clear that his safety in the city was under threat. “The security branch phoned me and told me to go to John Vorster Square, but I went into hiding for three weeks,” he says.The harassment didn’t stop after he left the city. “In 1978 the security branch from Nelspruit phoned and told me that they knew of my whereabouts and what I had done.”Nzima set up a bottle store after he settled up north, and later served as a member of parliament in the homeland Gazankulu government. He opened a school of photography in Bushbuckridge after being donated a black and white enlarger by The Sowetan newspaper.“There is an art to developing black and white pictures”, he says.When the Independent Group bought Argus newspapers in 1999, he was given copyright to his Hector photographs.Theuns ‘Rooi Rus’ SwanepoelThe police commander who is believed to have given the command to fire on the schoolchildren on the day, Theuns “Rooi Rus” Swanepoel, was described by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in 1998 as a policeman “who already had a long history of human rights violations as chief interrogator of the security branch”.Swanepoel told the TRC: “I made my mark. I let it be known to the rioters I would not tolerate what was happening. I used appropriate force. In Soweto and Alexandra where I operated, that broke the back of the organisers.”Die Afrikaner, the far-rightwing Herstigte Nasionale Party mouthpiece, gives the following version of how the first shot was fired in Orlando West: “In the heat of the struggle, (Swanepoel) and his men are called in from leave to stop a mass of seething, threatening youths. The atmosphere is laden and then one of the blacks throws a bottle into the face of the Red Russian (“Rooi Rus”).“A war breaks out as the young men let loose on the seething crowds and the one responsible for throwing the bottle looks like chicken mesh after the automatic machine gun flattens him.”Swanepoel allegedly lost his right eye in the incident. He died of a heart attack in 1998 at the age of 71.Mbuyisa MakhuboMbuyisa Makhubo, the schoolboy who picked up Hector, was harassed by the police after the incident and eventually went into exile. His mother, Nombulelo Makhubo, told the TRC that she received a letter from him from Nigeria in 1978, but that she had not heard from him since. She died in 2004.Antoinette SitholeAntoinette Sithole, Hector’s older sister and one of five sisters, still lives in Soweto. She was 17 in June 1976.“On the day, I was hiding in the second house next to my school Phefeni High School,” Antoinette says. “There were younger children at the march who shouldn’t have been there. I don’t know why they were there – Hector was one of them. There were random shots, we were not familiar with teargas shots. I was confused, those first shots could have been teargas.“I came out of hiding and saw Hector, and I called him to me. He was looking around as I called his name, trying to see who was calling him. I waved at him, he saw me and came over to me. I asked him what he was doing here, we looked around, there was a shot, and I ran back to my hiding place. When I looked out I couldn’t see Hector, I waited, I was afraid, where was he?“Then I saw a group of boys struggling. This gentleman came from nowhere, lifted a body, and I saw the front part of the shoe which I recognised as Hector’s. This man started to run with the body, I ran alongside, and said to him: who are you, this is my brother?“A car stopped in front of us, a lady got out and said she was from the press, and offered us a lift to the clinic. We put him in the car. I don’t remember how I got to the clinic, but the doctor said Hector was dead so I gave his details.“I was so scared of how I was going to tell my mother. Two teachers from a nearby school took me to my grandmother’s house. A neighbour phoned my mother at work, and when she got home at 5.30pm my uncle was standing outside the house with me. She said she had heard on the radio that children had died. My uncle broke the news – she was calm, she showed no emotion.“My father lived in Alexandra – my parents are divorced – he saw the picture in the paper and recognised me and wondered why I wasn’t at school.“My mother’s strength – she was stronger than my father – helped me come to terms with death. I can accept now that we are all going to die.“My mother is still alive and still very strong. She still lives in the same house in Soweto. Hector was her only son, and since the uprising she has lost one of my younger sisters in a car accident.“To me and my family, Hector did not die in vain.”Source: City of JohannesburgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Color Grading: Working with Hue vs. Curves in DaVinci Resolve

first_imgHue vs. LumThe Hue vs. Lum curve will affect the hue’s luminance. While powerful, say, for bringing a hue to life in an otherwise glum scene, it isn’t necessarily used often on 8-bit footage, or footage with a highly compressed codec. That’s because it will quickly bring out the artifacts. However, even with compressed footage, you can still slightly lighten hues to give them more attention without degrading the image.At first, it seems like the Hue vs. Sat and Hue vs. Lum curves are completely similar. In essence, I guess you could say they are. They both make a hue more or less visible. However, you have to remember that luminance accounts for how much black or white is mixed with the hue, while saturation indicates how much gray (or how pure the hue is).Increased saturation on the left; increased luminance on the right.So yes, while the goal of increasing a hue’s visibility will remain the same, the visual result will differ.The Hue vs. curves aren’t designed to completely overhaul the color schematics of your entire image; they are there to tweak and correct. The next time you feel like your image is great but is missing something and you can’t figure out what it is, take to the Hue vs. curves and see if a small tweak to one of the hues completes your image.Looking for more info on using DaVinci Resolve? Check out these articles:Revive Your Footage With Resolve 15’s Automatic Dirt Repair and Dust Buster ToolsHow to Use the Shared Node Feature in DaVinci ResolveQuick Tip: How To Use Optimized Media In DaVinci ResolveRemove Unwanted Shot Features With Resolve 15’s Patch ReplacerResolve’s Lens Reflections and Film Damage FX Analyzed Hue vs. HueThe Hue vs. Hue curve changes the selected hue to any other hue. There are a few ways you can work with these curves. You can select the hue icons below the curve, which will create curve points at the corresponding hue position in the curve panel. In example image below, I’ve clicked the cyan icon, and it’s created a broad cyan control point on the curve, and by moving it up or down, the sea changes hue.This method is ok for when the hue change is a very broad adjustment. A better way of using the curves is to hover over the pixel range in the viewer, and left-click with the qualifier. This will then create a more defined curve point for precise manipulation.For example, if I’ve received instruction that the actor actually had a pink jacket on in the scene, and I need to correct it in the before shot, I’ll change the curves to Hue vs. Hue, hover over the yellow jacket, and left-click.When comparing the control points, you’ll see that when selecting the hue from the viewer itself, the control points on the curve become more defined.Now, within seconds, I can shift the yellow jacket to a new hue.This curve is great for smaller elements that need a subtle tweak, and you will find it’s much easier to get a better result than by using a qualification key, which can often be noisy. When comparing the Hue vs. Hue curve and the qualification key, you will see a more significant result using the curve. Of course, you can get the same result using the qualification key. However, it requires fine-tuning.Hue vs. SatThe Hue vs. Saturation curve allows you to change the saturation of any hue selectively. Although the Hue vs. Hue curve is arguably more powerful in regards to creative input, I find the Hue vs. Saturation curve the best curve for bringing an element in the image to life. Again, the curve works in the same manner as the Hue vs. Hue (they all work this way), and by moving over a hue within the preview monitor and clicking, I can then adjust the saturation in the curve panel with the newly added control points. Although there’s no visual indication, you increase the saturation of the hue by pushing the curve point up, or desaturate by pulling the curve point down.In the example image, while the paddle boarder is obviously noticeable as the only object in the composition, he doesn’t necessarily stand out. By increasing the saturation of his jacket, he immediately becomes more dominant in the frame.Conversely, if you felt like the paddle boarder was too visible, and the story required the character to be almost seamless with the composition, you could desaturate his yellow jacket. Note that this goes for all of the Hue vs. curves — you do not need to create a new node when selecting a different hue to manipulate. For example, if I wanted to saturate the yellow jacket and desaturate the ocean water, I could do so on one node on the same curve. Color wheels are certainly the primary grading tool in DaVinci Resolve, but that doesn’t mean you should ignore curves altogether.As an old school After Effects user, the RGB curves was my initial introduction to and primary method of color grading. Unless you had a third-party plug-in, RGB curves were the “advanced” method of color grading in After Effects around 2006-2007. Color panels and Lumetri came just after I had left the platform to become versed in DaVinci Resolve. I was excited to finally leave curves behind and jump into the color wheels, where the professionals seemingly spent all their time.Of course, there’s no denying that the color wheels are the primary grading foundation in Resolve. However, this is not to say that we should dismiss curves. In fact, with curves, especially the HSL curves, you will find a wholly new and advantageous set of tools.Let’s have a look at what the different operations will do. (If you’re unsure how to find the different curves tools, you simply open the drop-down menu next to “custom.”)last_img read more

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BCCI pays Rs 7 crore to five stars for injuries

first_imgThe Indian cricket Board has made some touching gestures recently, like the one-time benefit purse to select retired Test and first-class players, including their widows, who were moved to tears on hearing the news.Now, in another praiseworthy gesture, the Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) has decided to compensate five players who had to forego part of their 2011 Indian Premier League (IPL) and Champions League T20 fees due to injuries sustained while representing India.The BCCI has decided to pay around Rs 7 crore as compensation to Sachin Tendulkar, Ashish Nehra, Munaf Patel, Rohit Sharma and Zaheer Khan for having missed matches in either IPL or Champions League T20 last year.The Board decided to pay compensation as it failed to insure the contracted players due to time constraint, despite promising them at a meeting in Mumbai before the February-April World Cup.The BCCI has, however, insured the 37 contracted players this year and is paying a premium of about Rs 4 crore.The then BCCI president and secretary, Shashank Manohar and N Srinivasan, respectively, had assured a group of senior players at the meeting that all the contracted players would be insured.”A few senior players – Sachin, MS Dhoni, Yuvraj Singh, and Ashish Nehra etc. – had met Manohar and Srinivasan before the World Cup to discuss a few issues like that of the physios and players’ insurance,” a top BCCI official aware of the developments told Mail Today.”At the meeting, the players were assured that if any of the contracted players got injured while playing for India, he would get compensation for the money he would thus lose for missing matches for his IPL franchise either in the 2011 IPL or the Champions League T20,” he said.advertisementThe BCCI, however, could not get the insurance done because, as the official said, the two contracts – one between players and the Board and another between players and their franchises – were signed very late, leaving no time for the Board to complete the insurance formalities. “It so happened that Nehra got injured during the World Cup semifinals against Pakistan in Mohali and the other four players either got injured or aggravated their injuries on the tour of England, following the trip to the West Indies immediately after the World Cup,” said the official.Tendulkar missed the entire CLT20 due to a toe injury that he aggravated during the forgettable tour of England and missed the five-match ODI series after playing in the Test series.Middle order batsman Rohit was struck on the finger by a Stuart Broad delivery during the first ODI in Chester-le-Street on September 3.Munaf suffered an ankle injury when he fell on the ground while chasing the ball during the fifth ODI in Cardiff on September 16.Pace spearhead Zaheer was the biggest disappointment as he suffered a strained right hamstring on the very first day of first Test at Lord’s, London, on July 21.Left-arm pacer Nehra fractured his finger while attempting to take a catch of Shahid Afridi during the World Cup semi-finals against Pakistan and missed the entire 2011 IPL season for Pune Warriors India. He hasn’t played for India since.”Since the top BCCI official had given their word to the players, now Srinivasan, with due approval of the working committee, has decided to pay the compensation to the five players,” the official informed.”And, the Board has insured all the contracted players this year and is paying Rs 4 crore as premium.”last_img read more

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Virat Kohli-led Team India will dominate Test cricket for long time: VVS Laxman

first_imgFormer India batsman VVS Laxman is optimistic about Indian cricket’s future and said the present Test team under Virat Kohli’s leadership has the potential to dominate for a long time.The long season starts with the Kanpur Test against New Zealand and India seeking to achieve the No. 1 status. Laxman said achieving the number one status will just be the beginning of a long journey for Kohli and his team.”It’s a great opportunity for India because they are going to play three quality Test playing countries. This India team has the potential to be the number one and they can be the best Test playing nation for a very long time,” Laxman told PTI on the sidelines of a promotional event.Laxman feels the current crop of players in the Test side have played a lot in overseas conditions and thus getting better. (Can New Zealand rewrite history by dominating India? )”The reason for that is everyone is young in their Test careers and also they have played a lot in overseas conditions. From personal experience I have seen that once you play overseas you become an all-round player because you get to play in different types of wickets, different weather conditions, different kinds of oppositions who are very good in their own backyard.”So I think they are well rounded cricketers now and playing in India they know what kind of conditions to expect, it gives the team the right kind of platform to showcase its talent, play to their potential and once they do that they will start dominating Test cricket for a long time,” he added.VIJAY, RAHUL AS OPENERSadvertisementHe felt India should go with five bowlers in the first Test at Kanpur, and picked Murali Vijay and KL Rahul as the team’s opening combination, with Cheteshwar Pujara at number three after his impressive run of scores in the Duleep Trophy.In its quest to be the world’s best, the team was peaking at the right time, Laxman felt. (India’s historic triumph over Australia in 2001 tops Test glories)”All of them are peaking at the right time, all of them are just about three or four years into their Test careers and all of them are young and fit and very talented. This team has got the talent, the all-round experience by touring all over the world and playing in different conditions. They have got great skill sets – be it in batting, fielding, spin bowling or fast bowling department.”TRENDSETTER KOHLIWhile being lavish in his praise for Kohli, Laxman felt the skipper is fortunate to have the right kind of players in his arsenal.”I think Virat Kohli is very fortunate to have players from which he can chose depending on the playing conditions. They have really impressed not only in Indian conditions but all over the world and all of them have great work ethic.”Kohil is an inspiration, a trendsetter for me as he inspires his colleagues to raise the benchmark. He is always looking for wins. He is flexible and has conveyed the message that he is here to win.”Asked about coach Anil Kumble, he said, “Anil is one of the most hard working cricketers I have come across and I am sure he will instill the same as a coach as well and it started off well in the West Indies. I believe that Virat and Anil will continue in same vein.”He also praised MS Dhoni, for the way he managed the transition phase after the retirements of big players.”Dhoni has to be really credited for the way he managed the transitional phase, the way he helped in transition and also the selection committee for reposing faith and identifying the players. It was tough for them because at the start of their careers they played a lot in overseas alien condition which is always a challenge for any cricketer, but still they have adapted,” Laxman said.”Results may not have gone their way but still I felt they had opportunities to win a match or series. There were some brilliant individual performances. Dhoni has to be credited for that and all the young players, who grabbed their opportunities and showed all of us that they belong to international cricket, also deserve kudos.”ROHIT CAN BE MATCH WINNERAbout Rohit Sharma, he said, “He is capable of being a match winner in Test cricket, it’s just about getting his game plan right.”Talking about vice-captain Ajinkya Rahane, Laxman said, “Rahane is a role model for first class cricketers because he has come through the grind of first class cricket. He has got a great technique and temperament and, above all, is a great team man. He is one of the best.”advertisementLaxman is impressed with the opening combination of KL Rahul and Murali Vijay.”Healthy competition really impressed me. KL Rahul was ideally suited for Test cricket but the way he has improved his skill sets in other formats it shows that he is very hard working, very matured, introspecting and wanting to improve his game, hope he gets a long run in the playing XI,” he said.Laxman called Wriddhiman Saha the country’s best glovesman at the moment. (Kapil Dev backs action-packed result-oriented Test matches )”Since Dhoni left Test cricket Saha has been the best keeper, he is a gritty character, very determined and is the best glovesman we have at the moment. If he can start contributing with the bat the way he batted in the West Indies it will be great for Indian cricket and himself,” he said.Asked about offspinner Ravichandran Ashwin, Laxman said, “He is the most valuable player, he is a spinner but technically and mentally equipped to play as a batsman.”He also congratulated the BCCI for arranging 13 Test matches in the home season.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

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