Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood Celebrate 20th Anniversary Of ‘A Go Go’ In Denver

first_imgLast night, John Medeski, John Scofield, Billy Martin, and Chris Wood came together for the first of two nights at Denver’s Ogden Theatre, marking the band’s first performance since their headlining performances on this year’s Jam Cruise. The quartet of jazz legends has been celebrating the 20th anniversary of their first collaborative album, A Go Go, which was released on April 7th, 1998, and followed up by 2006’s Out Louder, 2011’s In Case The World Changes Its Mind, and 2014’s Juice.For their Friday performance, Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood offered up a primarily groove-centric show, shying away from some of the more spacey and ambient tunes that Medeski, Martin & Wood are known for in favor of more danceable and upbeat numbers. For much of the show, Scofield took command on guitar, with the remaining musicians on stage giving him ample space to lead songs. As John Medeski explained to Live For Live Music in a recent interview:When [Medeski, Martin & Wood is] playing with John, as a trio, it gives us the opportunity to play the rhythm section, and we get to play together in a different way. When it’s the three of us alone, it’s this organism creating music as a whole. When we have John, we can be the backup band while he’s soloing and that gives us the opportunity to do a totally different thing.However, that’s not to say that Medeski, Martin & Wood merely took on the role of a “traditional” backing band; rather, all the musicians on stage gracefully weaved through solos and leads, highlighting the two decades-plus experience they have working with one another and cultivating a near-psychic ability to read one another.The show started with “Sham Time” off the quartet’s most recent studio album, Juice. Medeski led in the main theme of the tune, with Scofield at first offering tasteful accents. The funk-jazz fusion tune was a feel-good and upbeat opener, with Scofield truly unleashing for the first time of the night ahead of a quick drum break down offered by Billy Martin and slide-heavy solo from Chris Wood on the upright bass. The next tune, the namesake of the band’s first album together, saw the group taking their time, and the smooth tone of the song was beautifully contrasted by percussive interludes led by Martin, and later Medeski.Moving on, Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood offered up their first cover of the night, a high-energy and dynamic reworking of The Doors’ perennial classic, “Light My Fire”. The group followed up “Light My Fire” with A Go Go‘s “Chicken Dog”, which saw Scofield laying out one of his most reaching and climactic guitar solos of the first set. This tune also allowed Chris Wood to step forward, first with some interesting interplay between him and Medeski and later, toward the song’s triumphant close, with Martin and him riffing off one another.  As the first set wound to its close and technicians worked on an issue that arose with Chris Wood’s speakers, the band offered up a more exploratory and aggressive interlude, which showcased the full breadth of the quartet’s varying sounds. From this, a groove slowly emerged, and eventually, Martin’s propulsive beat led the song into a cascading and slinky portion that took on an almost Latin feel.The band contrasted this delightfully exploratory jam with Juice‘s “Juicy Lucy”, whose main riff draws from the traditional early rock and roll sounds of the 1960’s. While the former jam was avant-garde at points, this return to a widely familiar form re-grounded the performance before the band launched into “Helium” led in by a Billy Martin solo. Slowly adding Medeski and then Wood, who busted out some of his infamous dance moves, the rollicking rendition of “Helium” was made all the finer by the song’s discordant bridge, triumphant resolution, and Scofield’s thoughtful and decisive solo that closed out the first set.After departing the stage for set break, the four all-star musicians returned for set two with Martin leading the way with an opening drum solo to kick off “Chank”. Following the traditional funk-fusion number that saw a fiery Scofield solo right off the bat, the band moved into a groovy rendition of A Go Go‘s “Boozer”. One of the main highlights of the show was Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood’s rendition of “Deadzy”. Intentional and eerie throughout, the song and its extended jam eventually built to a satisfying resolution with a shred-heavy solo from Scofield.While appropriately the show focused on the band’s original catalog, up next were two crowd-pleasing covers, first Ray Charles’ “What’d I Say” followed by Cream’s “Sunshine Of Your Love”. “What’d I Say” tapped into the song’s old-school rock vibe, with Scofield given free reign of the melody and eventually leading an energetic call and response with the crowd. After the song’s huge close led in by a patient Scofield solo, the band dropped immediately into a dubby rendition of “Sunshine Of Your Love” (which appears on 2014’s Juice), which was used as a jump-off point for a wild jam. Medeski was a highlight of the rendition, with the pianist leading a brief, glitchy interlude before the band doubled down on the reggae feel of the song, as well as performing a stand-out solo on the melodica.Finally, as the show wound to its close, Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood closed out the second set with crowd-favorite A Go Go tune, “Hottentot”. The groove-heavy song was another highlight of the show, with Scofield’s powerful guitar leading the song from start to finish. The respective members of the group were all given their moments to stand out during the number before the song’s tight jam closed out the frame in full. Coming back for an encore, the group tapped into the spirit of New Orleans with “Tootie Ma Is A Big Fine Thing”, a number off Out Louder, making for a feel-good end to the show.Setlist: Medeski, Scofield, Martin & Wood | Ogden Theatre | Denver, CO | 3/30/2018Set One: Sham Time, A Go Go, Light My Fire, Chicken Dog, Tubes, Juicy Lucy, HeliumSet Two: Chank, Boozer, Tube, Deadzy/Shuffle, What’d I Say, Sunshine Of Your Love, HottentotEncore: Tootie Ma Is A Big Fine Thinglast_img read more

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Leonard Cohen Disses Kanye West & Jay-Z From The Grave With New Posthumously Released Poem

first_imgLeonard Cohen penned the spicy poem on March 15th, 2015. As Consequence Of Sound notes, “Kanye West Is Not Picasso” was most probably written in response to Kanye West’s comments earlier that month at Oxford University, when he compared himself to the famed Spanish painter. During the Oxford Guild address, Kanye is on record as saying,My goal, if I was going to do art, fine art, would have been to become Picasso or greater… That always sounds so funny to people, comparing yourself to someone who has done so much, and that’s a mentality that suppresses humanity. … If I could have done it again, I would have gone to the Art Institute over the American Academy.You can read Leonard Cohen’s “Kanye West Is Not Picasso” below.Kanye West is not PicassoI am PicassoKanye West is not EdisonI am EdisonI am TeslaJay-Z is not the Dylan of AnythingI am the Dylan of anythingI am the Kanye West of Kanye WestThe Kanye WestOf the great bogus shift of bullshit cultureFrom one boutique to anotherI am TeslaI am his coilThe coil that made electricity soft as a bedI am the Kanye West Kanye West thinks he isWhen he shoves your ass off the stageI am the real Kanye WestI don’t get around much anymoreI never haveI only come alive after a warAnd we have not had it yet[H/T Consequence Of Sound] Last week, a new collection of poetry and lyrics written by Leonard Cohen was posthumously released. The collection, entitled The Flame, features Cohen’s work before his death in November 2016. However, as singer-songwriter Amanda Shires noted in a recent Twitter post, The Flame also features a poem titled “Kanye West Is Not Picasso,” which is more-or-less like Cohen releasing a Yeezy dis track from the grave. In addition to Kanye, Cohen also takes shots at Jay-Z (“Jay-Z is not the Dylan of Anything”) and “the great bogus shift of bullshit culture.”last_img read more

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Something Rotten! Officially Opens on the Great White Way

first_img View Comments About the Artist: With a desire to celebrate the magic of live theater and those who create it, and with a deep reverence for such touchstones as the work of Al Hirschfeld and the wall at Sardi’s, Squigs is happy and grateful to be among those carrying on the traditions where theater and caricature meet. He was born and raised in Oregon, lived in Los Angeles for quite a long time and now calls New York City his home. The Renaissance is back! Something Rotten! opens officially at the Great White Way’s St. James Theatre on April 22. The new musical comedy is directed by Casey Nicholaw. To help celebrate the tuner’s opening night, Broadway.com resident artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson created this portrait of the cast.The whole merry crew is present! John Cariani, Brian d’Arcy James and Christian Borle are front and center as Bottom brothers Nigel and Nick and the Bard himself, respectively, as well as Kate Reinders as Portia, Heidi Blickenstaff as Bea, Brooks Ashmanskas as Brother Jeremiah, Michael James Scott as Minstrel, Gerry Vichi as Shylock and Brad Oscar as Nostradamus.Congratulations to the cast of Something Rotten!. To thine own self be true and make omelettes. Something Rotten!center_img Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 1, 2017last_img read more

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50-year Members of The Florida Bar 1956-2006

first_imgCongratulations to The Florida Bar’s 50-year Members — Class of 1956. Among you are a former governor, judges, politicians, professors, and Florida Bar leaders. Also prominent in your numbers are veterans of World War II and the Korean War, as well as founders of prominent law firms. Also, for the first time, the Bar this year is recognizing 50-Year Senior Counselors, defined as Bar members who have practiced for 50 years, but part of that service has been in another state. The entire membership of The Florida Bar celebrates your service to the profession, service to the community, and service to individuals by protecting their rights. We collectively thank each of you! Louie N. Adcock, Jr., St. Petersburg A. Dallas Albritton, Jr., Tampa Reubin O’Donovan Askew, Tallahassee Richard Stephen Banick, Miami James A. Baxter, Clearwater William Holmes Benson, Coral Springs Herbert Ronald Berkley, New York, NY Sidney Maurice Bodzin, Miami Dana Ripley Bullen II, Alexandria, VA Carroll A. Burke, Bowling Green, KY Myron H. Burnstein, Hollywood, FL Joseph Benjamin Cofer, Tampa Herbert Jay Cohen, Weston Richard Elwood Conner, Davie Byron Thomas Cooksey, Vero Beach John Francis Corrigan, Jacksonville Beach Jerry B. Crockett, Miami Marion M. Cromwell, Tequesta Chandler F. Culver, Hudson, MI Charles Henry Damsel, Jr., West Palm Beach Carroll Phillips Davis, Miami James Ronald Dressler, Cocoa Beach James F. Durham II, Melbourne Beach Frederick B. Estergren, Ft. Walton Beach Peter Thorp Fay, Miami Joseph A. Ferrara, Boca Raton Joseph W. Fleece, Jr., St. Petersburg Richard M. Gale, Miami William F. Garcia, Tampa W. Stewart Gilman II, Winter Park Joseph Glass, New Haven, CT William H. Grant, Jr., Jacksonville William Victor Gruman, Tampa Gilbert Arthur Haddad, Coral Gables Fred C. Hannahs, Albuquerque, NM Harold R. Holmes, Seminole Ronald W. Jabara, Miami Louis LeRoy LaFontisee, Jr., Miami Irving B. Levenson, Miami Edward D. Lewis, West Palm Beach Alan Lindsay, Palm Beach James J. Linus, Vero Beach George R. Lubienski, Dearborn, MI Stanley J. Magenheimer, Coral Gables Raymond J. Malloy, Dallas, TX Yale Manoff, Boca Raton Robert Sawbridge McCormick, Ft. Lauderdale John Lovell Moore, Jr., Marion, MA Joseph Mark Murasko, Altamonte Springs Sherwood Forrest Myers, Deland John Starr Neely, Jr., Tallahassee Gerald T. Nolan, Plantation Solon Franklin O’Neal, Jr., Tampa Rev. Jordan B. Peck, Jr., St. Petersburg George W. Phillips, Land-O-Lakes Francis E. Pierce, Jr., Orlando Jack H. Polan, Palm Beach Gardens James F. Pollack, Coral Gables John Alton Reed, Jr., Orlando Lewis Martin Ress, North Miami Earle V. Rifas, Miami Sy A. Robbins, Miami Alan J. Rogers, Boca Raton Marian Sirote Rosen. Houston, TX Donald S. Rosenberg, Miami Kenneth L. Ryskamp, West Palm Beach Martin Sack, Jr., Jacksonville Richard E. Saleeby, Palm Beach Allen R. Samuels, St. Petersburg Johnson S. Savary, Sarasota Leslie David Scharf, Tampa Richard M. Sepler, Miami Robert T. Shafer, Jr., Ft. Myers Richard Thomas Shankweiler, Ft. Lauderdale Thurston Albert Shell, Pensacola John Woolslair Sheppard, Ft. Myers Frederick Jackson Simpson, Jacksonville Thomas B. Slade III, Jacksonville Alan Solomon, Waitsfield, VT W. Thomas Spencer, Winter Park Lawrence W. Sperling, Ypsilanti, MI Robert J. Sperling. Woodmere, NY Roger H. Staley, Ft. Lauderdale Robert J. Stampfl, Miami Lakes F. E. Steinmeyer III, Tallahassee Stanely R. Sterbenz, South Miami Jerome H. Stern, Hallandale Carl L. Thompson, Jr., Orlando Edward Chester Tietig, Melbourne Talbot Whitfield Trammell, Tallahassee C. Pfeiffer Trowbridge, Stuart Barton S. Udell, North Miami Beach Theodore H. Van DeVenter, Jr., Winter Garden Gerald M. Walsh, Ft. Lauderdale Howard Allen Weiss, Chicago, IL Lee Weissenborn, Miami Robert Anderson White, Coral Gables Joseph Wyatt Womack, Mocksville, NC William A. Zeiher, Ft. Lauderdale Blair I. Zimmett, Miami 50-year Members of The Florida Bar 1956-2006 50-year Members of The Florida Bar 1956-2006 July 1, 2006 Regular News 50-year Senior Counselors Paul I. Auerbauch, Palm Beach Gardens Melvin William Butens, Hobe Sound Edward R. Fink, Ft. Lauderdale Irving David Gaines, Milwaukee, WI Nicholas H. Hagoort, Jr., Boynton Beach Allan E. Jones, Sarasota James L. Kershaw, Tavares William J. Lee, Howard Joseph W. Muldoon, Green Cove Joseph Pack, Delray Beach Alfred J. Pomeranz, Hallandale Beach Paul Conrad Schmitt, North Palm Beach Samuel Sheres, Aventura Arne Siegel, Palm Beach Gardens Jack Charles Wolff, Boca Raton Paul C. Zempel, Plant City Mitchell B. Smith, Tarpon Springslast_img read more

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Do You Hear What I Hear

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr On Saturday mornings during the Christmas season, you can usually find me in my office streaming my favorite Christmas classics and whittling away at the last of my weekly to-do list. One of the items on my list involves doing some research on my clients’ competitors: banks, misguided credit unions, payday lenders, fintech, and such. As Bing Crosby’s “Do You Hear What I Hear” blared from my speakers during a recent review session, I came across an ad that left me confused about what a particular financial institution (which shall remain nameless) was trying to communicate.I was looking at a stock photo and a vague statement. The phrase “Be worry free” was plastered over a stretched-out image. Be worry free? About what? Finances, I’m sure. But what exactly was this FI trying to say? Were they offering free checking? A Skip-A-Pay program? Unfortunately, the button on the image didn’t work, so I wasn’t able to track down any additional details. Now, before you scoff and assume that your creative is ten times better—and it very well may be—have you ever stopped to consider whether your message is clear?This question about clarity brings me back to the song “Do You Hear What I Hear” and reminds me of what Washington Post columnist Alexandra Petri said about it in her recent review of the Top 100 Most Popular Christmas Songs. “A better name for this song would be ‘I Assume You Cannot Hear Anything I Am Saying and so I Am Going to Repeat All the Words Twice.’” Petri goes on to say, “The problem with this song is the problem that arises any time you are forced to repeat something you said because someone didn’t hear it properly: namely, that you didn’t phrase the thing very well in the first place and having to say it again just makes you more painfully aware of how awkward your wording was.” All too often, her musical commentary could just as easily apply to the marketing efforts of many financial institutions. continue reading »last_img read more

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Letters to the Editor for Monday, Dec. 2

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsGov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18 Entitled teachers should stick to jobsHaving worked as a school business administrator over my career, I have seen so much of an entitlement mentality by teachers and their union.You have a contract and the administration is following it. Let the administrators do their jobs and teachers teach. Physical education classes are important, but prep time is minimal compared to most other subjects. Contractually, the administration has every right to require what they are presently.Not all teachers stay great at their jobs, and many develop a poor attitude later, especially after receiving tenure. The cost of getting rid of a bad teacher, even if they do something incredibly wrong, is well over $300,000.And that is taxpayer money we are talking about. That is why some feel they are entitled and untouchable. I don’t believe in tenure. No other career offers this type of protection. Niskayuna is fortunate to have so many excellent teachers. The district performs extremely well, and my children benefited greatly from graduating from here.My experience has taught me that some teachers in school districts often have the mentality and goal to do as little as possible while receiving the most money and benefits possible.So here we have just another example of just that. The president of the teacher’s union talks about what should have happened during negotiations, but she was totally part of these negotiations.Would have-could have-should have syndrome. Just teach already and stop appearing to be big whiny babies.Brian KreisSchenectadyUpstate not getting the help it needsJohn Cropley’s  Nov. 26 article on the per capita income was interesting. This letter offers additional commentary on the data he reported. I annualized the population and income change over the 20-year period. That provides numbers that are more relatable to things like school tax increases, consumer price index, etc. On an annual basis, incomes have increased from 4.1 percent for Schoharie County to 6.5 percent for Saratoga County. Saratoga County is an outlier in many respects. I do not believe it’s much higher-than-average income growth can be attributed to 3,000 well-paid employees. That is fewer than 2 percent of the total population of the county. Saratoga is the only county that increased both population and income at a rate greater than New York state as a whole.In fact population growth rivaled the overall U.S. number. Without Saratoga County the data yields a population growth of 2.8 percent and an income growth of 4.6 percent.So what is it about Saratoga County? The county has been known to have a lower tax burden. Communities in Fulton and Montgomery counties have made the news recently with their difficulties in funding schools. Given that these counties have lost population and have seen the lowest increase in income, it shouldn’t come as a surprise.Many state and federal representatives have pledged to improve the economic situation of upstate New York. Except for Saratoga County, the statistics say they failed. Perhaps our representatives will offer their assessment of the statistics.Dennis UleryBallston SpaTrump tax cut most help to corporationsWhen  you do your taxes next year, I think it might be a good idea to consider what corporations did with their tax cut.Trump said it was a “middle class cut,” but the truth is that FedEx paid $1.5 billion in taxes in 2017. In 2018, under the effective tax rate in the next year, it paid nothing. The effective tax rate for FedEx has gone from 34 percent to less than 0 percent. Read the business section of the Nov. 29 issue of The Week to verify my numbers. How will you explain this to your grandchildren? (1,000 million billion dollars in deficit spending this year alone.) What did FedEx do with the money? It bought $2 million in FedEx stock, proving one more time that supply side economics doesn’t work.FDR said, “The test of our progress is not whether we add to the abundance of those who have much, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”Nick CoupasSaratoga Springs Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionGet informed about what’s happeningI talked with friends recently about politics, unusual since we don’t agree. One issue discussed by a former vice-president of an international company was the stock market. He was happy with the level of the stock market and, therefore, happy with the president.Another friend mentioned that not everyone had money in the market. My first friend said they might not know they do, but their pension is probably invested in the market. The second friend said many people no longer have pensions.A corporation files for bankruptcy and there go peoples’ pensions. First friend spoke about the nearly full employment numbers. Second friend mentioned that many of the new jobs were service jobs that do not pay a living wage, which is why people have more than one job and have no pensions.Just as people have different views about the financial health of the country, people have differing opinions about impeachment.If you don’t believe America should exemplify the rule of law, support our allies and shine a light into the world, then maybe you don’t care about the sessions. However, if you believe that wealthy and powerful America must be a force for good, you probably found the suggestion that our president has bypassed trained, loyal staffers to be represented by Rudy Giuliani in working with a critical ally, both astonishing and terrifying.Asking for personal favors, not national favors. Pay attention. The impeachment outcomes will affect our country’s future and influence our dealings with the world. Be informed.Janice WalzScotiaSet weight limits to limit truck trafficThe recent Gazette article regarding the Glenridge Road bridge hits notes that commercial GPS systems tell drivers where there are roads that have weight limits. But the municipality has to set a weight limit on the street for it to be flagged.The residents of Dean and McClellan streets in Niskayuna have been pleading to officials for years to place limits, but officials at both the town and county have refused. So tractor-trailers, tour buses and cement trucks continue to rumble through our neighborhood, putting pedestrians at risk and degrading the road at a much faster rate.This speed, high volume and truck traffic is a chronic townwide problem, and more needs to be done to address it.Speed signs were installed last summer. And yes, they help, but only in the area where they are seen. The village of Colonie had its speed problem solved overnight with speed bumps. Why can’t we?Balltown Road is a congested mess and is one of the main reasons why traffic is spilling into our neighborhood. Town and county officials need to follow Sen. Jim Tedesco’s and Supervisor Chris Koetzle’s lead and advocate to the state to address this.This problem is not going to go away on its own, and any traffic engineer will tell you when you mix speed, high volume and truck traffic with pedestrian traffic, you have a recipe for a disaster. But if officials wait until after someone dies to address these problems, they are too late.Aaron HullSchenectadyAttempting a crime is against the lawI got my best laugh of the day, when I heard a Fox News person say that Trump did not commit a crime. “The Constitution does not mention attempted bribery” Dur. It doesn’t mention attempted murder or attempted robbery, either. Tell that to all the prisoners serving 10 years or more for attempt.Lou BachScotialast_img read more

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Gov. Wolf Addresses Opioid Command Center Summit, Highlights Progress Made, Encourages Local Initiatives

first_imgGov. Wolf Addresses Opioid Command Center Summit, Highlights Progress Made, Encourages Local Initiatives October 01, 2019 Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Boalsburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today kicked off his administration’s first Opioid Command Center Opioid Summit: Think Globally, Act Locally, which brought together 200 individuals helping their communities fight the opioid crisis, including community organizations, non-profits, schools, health care workers, addiction and recovery specialists, and families affected by the opioid crisis.“Pennsylvania has approached the opioid crisis with an “all-hands-on-deck” response to a threat to our commonwealth,” Gov. Wolf said. “In addition to our many local partners, almost every department in the state has been pursuing some type of program to assist Pennsylvanians affected by the opioid crisis.”Gov. Wolf highlighted the accomplishments and contributions of numerous state agencies, as well as the overall progress in fighting the crisis. Successful efforts include distributing more than 13,000 free naloxone kits across the commonwealth during three distribution days and 50,000 kits to first responders who have administered nearly 30,000 doses of the life-saving medication to date; expanding access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) in state correctional facilities; providing MAT grants to health care facilities and removing the need for prior-authorization from most private health insurers in the state to treat with MAT.“These efforts and more are contributing to winning this battle, raising awareness, reducing the stigma associated with opioid use disorder, and expanding access to treatment, all of which are saving lives and putting people on the road to recovery,” Gov. Wolf said.The no-cost two-day summit held in State College focuses on the importance of communication, cooperation, and collaboration to provide and implement local level initiatives. Following the governor’s opening remarks, the state’s health secretaries involved in the Opioid Command Center held a panel discussion on the role each agency plays in the crisis. A federal panel featuring the United States Health and Human Services, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Office of National Drug Control Policy will kick off the second day of the summit.Some of the breakout sessions include expanding the role of first responders, discussing interventions and recovery programs such as the warm hand-off program, implementation of MAT, and partnerships to help fight the crisis.Recently the administration provided more than 7,000 kits of naloxone during two distribution days. It was part of Stop Overdoses in PA: Get Help Now Week, an initiative spearheaded by the Opioid Command Center to increase awareness of overdose deaths and help fight the ongoing epidemic.The Opioid Command Center, established in January 2018 when Gov. Wolf signed the first opioid disaster declaration, meets every week to discuss the opioid crisis. The command center is staffed by personnel from 17 state agencies, spearheaded by the departments of Health and Drug and Alcohol Programs.Recent data shows that in 2018, more than 4,400 people died from a drug overdose. This represents a nearly 18 percent decrease in drug overdose deaths from 2017.Work to address the opioid crisis focuses on three areas: prevention, rescue and treatment. Efforts over the past four years, working with state agencies, local, regional and federal officials, have resulted in significant action to address the opioid crisis.“I feel confident that with the talent and commitment of the people in this room and our partners across the state, we can end the opioid epidemic in Pennsylvania,” Gov. Wolf said. “Thank you all for the hard work you’ve done so far. We will continue to work together in this fight.”Learn more about how the Wolf Administration is fighting the opioid crisis.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Perks and pitfalls of owning a home with a family member

first_imgAerial view of housing around the Coomera River.“Co-ownership allows families to overcome this hurdle and purchase property in their preferred location,” he said.“In this day and age, co-ownership will undoubtedly be the way forward for many people.”But what happens when it all goes wrong?These are Mr Dawson’s top tips for families wanting to purchase property together: Decide who can afford what As with families, no co-ownership agreement looks the same. You may decide that it will be a 50-50 split between the two parties or 70-30 or three parties on title at 40-30-30. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa17 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago Document your roles and expectations While in a dream world we would all have the same views on everything, that’s not always the case. I can’t stress enough how important it is to be clear and agree on your roles and expectations of co-ownership to avoid any disappointment down the line and to ensure that all parties have a smooth and beneficial experience of co-ownership. Have an exit strategy in place How parties exit a co-ownership purchase is one of the main questions I encounter from families. Make sure that exit options are clearly defined. Be mortgage aware It’s critical to obtain the right mortgage. Look for a mortgage that allows multiple parties to borrow against the one title. There are loans in the market place where serviceability can be split according to your individual percentage of ownership. Make sure you have a co-ownership agreement As you can see, there’s many ways that this process can become a negative experience, but that really doesn’t need to be the case providing you have a co-ownership agreement in place, outlining all of these scenarios.Co-owning with family may seem like a no-brainer, but it’s always important to have legal agreements in place to protect you all. Residential property on the Gold Coast.ONE in three people are considering buying a property with a family member to get onto the real estate ladder.David Dawson, founder of Kohab, a digital marketplace for co-ownership, said buying property alongside family was a great way for younger people to purchase a home in an environment where they might not be able to do it alone.last_img read more

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Lancashire shuffles management team for LPFA partnership

first_imgMike Jenson continues in his role as CIO of the pension fund and will take this forward developing the fund’s liability-management strategies. Trevor Castledine has been promoted to deputy CIO after previously being a portfolio manager in the in-house asset management team.Andrew Fox becomes head of policy and compliance, in charge of the new overall strategy and governance, shifting away from his previous investment compliance focus, while Diane Lister remains head of the LCPF’s in-house and third-party administration offering.Chief executive of Lancashire County Council, Jo Turton, said the pension fund deserved a dedicated senior management team.“The LCPF provides retirement security for over 150,000 scheme members working for over 270 different organisations,” she said. “It deserves to receive dedicated senior management attention and focus.“The new team will be able to successfully lead the fund into the more complex and collaborative future that faces the LGPS and continue to place Lancashire at the forefront of innovation.”The Lancashire and London funds announced their liability-management merger in December.The Department for Communities and Local Government is shortly expected to announce its decision on whether to force the 89 LGPS funds in England and Wales to invest all assets through two collective investment vehicles – amid a push to encourage collaboration among the separated funds.Lancashire’s neighbour, the Greater Manchester Pension Fund (GMPF), also announced collaboration with the LPFA, creating a £500m infrastructure investment fund outside of government plans.For more on the LCPF’s ALM partnership and future investment strategy, read Carlo Svaluto Moreolo’s interview with CIO Mike Jenson The Lancashire County Pension Fund (LCPF) has appointed its management team as the scheme becomes an independent entity in preparation for its partnership with a London fund.For the first time, the LCPF will be recognised as an entirely separate organisation to Lancashire County Council, a local government organisation in Northwest England.The £5.3bn (€7.1bn) LCPF is to create an asset-liability management (ALM) partnership with the £4.9bn London Pensions Fund Authority (LPFA), which will see the local government pension schemes (LGPS) pool investments and management to reduce costs.George Graham will head the fund as director at the LCPF, having previously been the council’s deputy treasurer, where he managed governance and compliance.last_img read more

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Cassar-Daley farm sells for a steal

first_imgThe farm sold for $550,000A local couple has snapped up the Cassar-Daley family farm escape for a bargain, paying $80,000 less than the country crooner and his presenter wife.The Courier Mail can reveal that the riverfront country home of Troy Cassar-Daley and Laurel Edwards sold for $550,000, according to CoreLogic. At the time, Ray White Ipswich agent Jackson Wales said the successful party was a young local couple, who he described as “awesome, laid-back, typical Aussies.”“They are keen to use it for farming and maybe rent the house out to friends who are moving down from the north,” he said.Prior to the auction, Cassar-Daley said his family had many fond memories at the farm.“It’s that time of our lives where we have two adult kids and we have to move on to the next part of our lives that doesn’t involve riding and caring for horses or slashing paddocks,” he said. MORE REAL ESTATE NEWS More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoThe farm at 142 Fielding Rd, VernorThe homestead has four bedrooms, two bathrooms and parking for six vehicles.It has landscaped gardens and stunning river views, a country-style kitchen plus a number of living areas. RELATED: Country music star’s farm ‘escape’ under offer There is also a huge powered shed, two main paddocks, cattle yards and multiple day shelters, a water allocation from the Brisbane River, town and tank water.The property went to auction on March 29 but was passed in, with an offer secured the following day. CMC AWARDS Troy Cassar-Daley and Laurel Edwards .Picture Mike BatterhamProperty records show that the couple bought the lifestyle property for $630,000 in 2007.Known as Carinya, the homestead featured in Cassar-Daley’s hit song, I Love This Place.The lifestyle property at Vernor spans 4.1 hectares. last_img read more

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