Smith leads Unbeaten UCLA to win over Southern Utah

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOS ANGELES (AP) — Chris Smith scored 20 points and Jalen Hill added 17 points to lead UCLA to a 76-61 win over Southern Utah on Monday night.The Bruins remain undefeated and have won all four of their games at home.UCLA built an early 17-3 lead behind an impressive defense and Southern Utah went 8½ minutes without a field goal during that stretch. UCLA had 11 steals and 10 blocked shots,John Knight III led the Thunderbirds (2-2) with 14 points.In the second half, Shareef O’Neal made a 3-pointer from the right wing for the first points of his UCLA career. O’Neal, the son of Shaquille O’Neal, had missed the two previous games due to a hip injury and sat out last season because of open-heart surgery last December.This was the first meeting between the schools.For Southern Utah, Dre Marin made a 3-pointer from the corner with 10:44 left in the first half to end the scoring drought and cut the lead to 17-6. Southern Utah (2-2) trailed 35-22 at halftime.BIG PICTURESouthern Utah: The Thunderbirds weren’t able to run offensive sets like they wanted, but the experience playing UCLA at Pauley Pavilion will surely pay dividends later.UCLA: The Bruins defense was stifling and that led to plenty of transition baskets. The game was a campus game for the Maui Invitational.UP NEXTSouthern Utah: Plays Charleston Southern in the Maui Invitational at Johnson City, Tennessee on Saturday.UCLA: Hosts Hofstra on Thursday. Associated Press Written by Tags: Chris Smith/Maui Invitational/SUU Thunderbirds Basketball/UCLA Bruins November 19, 2019 /Sports News – Local Smith leads Unbeaten UCLA to win over Southern Utahlast_img read more

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Berkshire Hathaway to acquire gas assets of Dominion Energy in $10bn deal

first_img Atlantic Coast Pipeline is not part of the acquisition. (Credit: Pixabay/Adam Radosavljevic) Berkshire Hathaway’s subsidiary Berkshire Hathaway Energy has agreed to acquire Dominion Energy’s natural gas transmission and storage business in a deal valued at  $9.7bn.Under the deal, Berkshire will acquire more than 12,392km of natural gas transmission lines, with about 20.8 billion cubic feet per day of transportation capacity.It will also include 900 billion cubic feet of operated natural gas storage with 364 billion cubic feet of company-owned working storage capacity as well as the partial ownership of a liquefied natural gas export, import and storage facility.The transaction includes acquisition of 100% stake in Dominion Energy Transmission, Questar Pipeline and Carolina Gas Transmission as well as the 50% stake in Iroquois Gas Transmission System.Atlantic Coast Pipeline is not part of the acquisitionBerkshire Hathaway Energy president and CEO Bill Fehrman said: “This premier natural gas transmission and storage business has been operated and managed in a best-in-class manner.“Acquiring this portfolio of natural gas assets considerably expands our company’s footprint in several Eastern and Western states as well as globally, increasing the market reach and diversity of Berkshire Hathaway Energy.”The transaction includes the assumption of around $5.7bn of existing indebtedness that will reduce Dominion Energy’s total leverage.Upon closing, Berkshire will also make a cash payment of around $4bn to Dominion Energy.The firm said that the deal does not include purchase of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline.The deal also includes acquisition of 25% stake of Cove Point LNG – an LNG export, import and storage facility in Maryland, while Dominion Energy will own the 50% of Cove Point.Brookfield Asset Management will continue to own the remaining 25% share in the LNG facility.Once the transaction is closed, Berkshire Hathaway Energy will operate the Cove Point facility, which is one of six LNG export facilities in the US.Furthermore, the deal is subject to regulatory approvals and is expected to be closed in the fourth quarter of the year. The transaction also includes acquisition of 25% stake of Cove Point LNG facility in Marylandlast_img read more

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Press release: Everyone will benefit if men include more women in top roles

first_img The fortunes of mankind depend on the inclusion of womankind. Without enabling women to reach their full potential and to lead our organisations and institutions, we will not be able to meet the challenges of our time. These first steps show how businesses value equality in their organisations. By changing workplace culture, championing flexible working and encouraging shared parental leave – and encouraging fathers to take their share, workplaces will reflect the UK’s diverse society.The Women’s Business Council’s Men as Change Agents group has published a toolkit sharing innovative ideas for business leaders to help close the gender pay gap and encourage women’s progression in the workplace.The toolkit, which includes a foreword from Minister for Women and Equalities Penny Mordaunt, gives practical advice to CEOs and other senior business leaders, the majority of whom are men, at FTSE 350 companies and other prominent businesses to achieve better gender balance in their organisations.Recommendations in the toolkit include building a pipeline of female talent so women can move to more senior roles, championing agile and flexible working and encouraging more men and women to take up shared parental leave.Notes to editors:For more information please contact the GEO press office on 0207 023 0600. McKinsey Global Institute estimates that if women had the same role in labour markets as men, up to an estimated $28 trillion (26%) could be added to the global GDP in 2025. Their research from 2016 estimates that bridging the UK gender gap in work has the potential to add £150 billion to the UK economy by 2025. By taking a stand for equality and supporting women at work, male business leaders can create true equality on boards and close the gender pay gap.Minister for Women and Equalities Penny Mordaunt said: By addressing the inequalities and cultures behind the gender pay gap it’s not just women who benefit. We all do. And men are recognising that it is the smart and right agenda for them to support this. To see the RT Hon Penny Mordaunt and over 90 senior business leaders in attendance, showing their enthusiasm and support, is truly inspiring and a clear sign that meaningful progress is within our grasp. McKinsey’s 2018 Delivering through Diversity report shows that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity in their executive teams are 21% more likely to have above-average profitability than companies are in the bottom quartile. The report also found that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity in their executive teams are also 27% more likely to have industry-leading performance on longer-term value creation than those in the bottom quartile. We are immensely grateful to The Duke of York for generously hosting the event and for being such an enthusiastic supporter of our efforts throughout the preparations. The Minister delivered her speech during an event at St James’s Palace for 90 business leaders.Only 29% of FTSE 100 board members are female, and only 13 CEOs and 21 Chairs in the FTSE 350 are women. But a recent report shows that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity in their executive teams are 21% more likely to have above-average profitability than companies in the bottom quartile.Launched in 2016, the government-backed Hampton-Alexander Review set FTSE 350 businesses a target of having 33% of all board and senior leadership positions held by women by the end of 2020.At the first dinner of its kind, hosted by The Duke of York, the government-backed Women’s Business Council brought together influential men from across industry to promise to support women at work.As part of the Men As Change Agents (MACA) initiative, business leaders have been invited to pledge to: We cannot afford to ignore the abilities of fifty percent of the population. We all need to think about what we can do to encourage and this talent. Hampton Alexander Review We are talking about people’s talent. We are talking about people’s capabilities. In the twenty first century it should not make a difference whether you are a male or female. If you have the qualities, experience and knowledge you should have the opportunities. I want to thank them for their leadership and for pledging to ensure at least 33% of their board members are women by 2020. We are absolutely delighted to be involved in hosting a special and momentous dinner, for the Men as Change Agents’ ‘Lead the change’ initiative. The Duke of York: Men As Agents of Change toolkit personally champion the achievement of the Hampton Alexander challenge of 33% of executive level and senior business leaders being women by 2020; sponsor between one and three women in their organisations with the potential to secure an executive level role within three years; be a change agent and encourage other businesses, privately and publicly, to achieve better gender balance in UK business leadership. assess candidates based on actual tasks they would be expected to perform in their role, and make interviews more structured to avoid unfair bias creeping in; encourage salary negotiation by showing salary ranges, as women are currently less likely to negotiate their pay than men; and introduce transparency to pay, promotion and reward processes. At the beginning of August the Government Equalities Office published a new ‘What Works’ guidance for companies to help them improve the recruitment and progression of women and close their gender pay gap. The guidance, including details of all of the research evidence, has been published on the gender pay gap website. The advice to employers includes recommendations to: MACA heads and business leaders, Denis Woulfe MBE and Emer Timmons, said:last_img read more

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Remembering My Morning Jacket’s “What The World Needs Now” From LOCKN’ 2016

first_imgOne of the true stand out sets from the 2016 LOCKN’ Festival was My Morning Jacket’s headlining performance, opening the eyes of many jam band fans to their true rock and roll power. Jim James and co. were in fine form throughout the night, playing hits from their catalog with a few choice surprises.Among those surprises was the live debut of Burt Bacharach’s  “What The World Needs Now Is Love,” coming at a poignant time during a heated presidential campaign season. The cover took LOCKN’ by storm, as tens of thousands sang along in unison for quite the magical moment.As we now find ourselves in times of uncertainty, let’s remember the love that My Morning Jacket brought to LOCKN’ during that moment. Watch pro-shot video of the performance below:My Morning Jacket – “What The World Needs Now”[Video: EasyMorningRebel 665]Setlist: My Morning Jacket | LOCKN’ | Arrington, VA | 8/29/16Victory Dance, Compound Fracture, Off The Record, Circuital, Steam Engine, What The World Needs Now (Burt Bacharach), Lay Low, I’m Amazed, Spring (Among the Living), State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U.) (Jim James), Phone Went West, Could You Be Loved (Bob Marley & The Wailers). Mahgeetah, Purple Rain (Prince), Wordless Chorus, Touch Me I’m Going To Scream Pt. 2, Rebel Rebel (David Bowie), One Big Holidaylast_img read more

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A data bank to battle cancer

first_imgPersonalized cancer treatment has become a holy grail of researchers, physicians, and patients. By reading the genes of individual tumors, drugs can sometimes be used against specific cells, replacing the shotgun blasts of traditional chemotherapy and radiation with treatments that are more targeted with fewer side effects.In the past several years, researchers have taken steps toward that goal, identifying specific mutations in breast, skin, blood, and other cancers and developing treatments targeting those specific cell types. Those treatments remain limited, however, leaving the majority of cancer patients still facing lengthy, draining chemotherapy and radiation regimens.Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute are seeking to improve that. The Harvard-affiliated hospitals are collaborating on a massive, long-term effort to collect and analyze tumor tissue from 10,000 cancer patients each year. Using automated gene-analysis technology, they’ll scan each tumor for nearly 500 known mutations on 41 genes.Barrett Rollins, Dana-Farber’s chief scientific officer and Linde Family Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), said the project straddles the research and clinical worlds. It will enable researchers to understand better how different tumors behave, and it will provide an opportunity to test new therapies, even as it provides information to physicians.Though the program is just getting off the ground, Janina Longtine, associate professor of pathology at HMS, director of molecular diagnostics at the Brigham, and head of the lab conducting the analysis, said that researchers already have issued about 100 reports on tumor types that might be useful to physicians in designing cancer patients’ care.Though the study, called Profile, will initially examine tumor genes for known mutations, it also will allow more rapid testing of new treatments by providing a database of patients, their cancers’ genetic profiles, and records of what treatments have worked or not over time. If a drug company comes up with a new treatment for breast cancer, for example, rather than spending a year recruiting patients, the database could include a group of patients whose disease has failed first-line treatment, and who might be good candidates for the drug trial. Just by speeding up the process of performing clinical trials, the system aims to cut the time to market for promising treatments, Rollins said.As genetic-sequencing technology advances and becomes cheaper, researchers hope to switch from examining tumors for known mutations to scanning tumors’ entire genetic codes, which would allow researchers to look for new mutations and currently unknown weaknesses that could be targeted by future treatments.The Profile study, one of the largest of its kind in the nation, is part of a shifting cancer landscape. Not long ago, cancers were known mainly by the type of tissue in which they originated. As medical understanding of cancer biology and genetics advanced, scientists understood that cancer cells were driven not just by the tissues from which they arose, but by the mutations that, for example, caused skin cells to transform into melanoma.What had long been thought to be one type of cancer may turn out to have five, 10, or 20 subtypes, Rollins said. In addition, cancers arising in different organs have been shown to have mutations in the same genes, and may respond to similar treatments. A mutation in the B-Raf gene, which creates a protein involved in cell growth, has been found in 10 or 12 cancers.While this newfound understanding greatly complicates the view of cancer, it also provides multiple avenues through which to attack the disease.Rollins said this project is by far the most complicated he has worked on and involves 40 people. In addition to the scientific aspects, there were administrative tasks related to coordinating two major institutions (which will be joined by a third, Harvard-affiliated Children’s Hospital, in the coming months). The goal is to enroll as many cancer patients at the participating hospitals as possible, something that required study intake procedures to be incorporated into normal hospital intake procedures, while still protecting confidentiality.“There’s data in all those patients,” Rollins said. “What we wanted to do … is turn a population of 16,000 patients into a cohort we could study.”last_img read more

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Finding their place in the world

first_imgBefore traveling to Russia over the summer, Sasha Shpitalnik ’19 feared that something might go wrong with her senior thesis research on nongovernmental organizations there, or with the trip in general. But it didn’t. After more than 100 interviews, lots of connections, and plenty of sightseeing in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Novosibirsk, Shpitalnik realized the trip had enhanced her research and changed her outlook on life.“I was scared, but I had to force myself to push through and explore the unknown,” said Shpitalnik, a government and Slavic languages and literatures concentrator. “I spent many hours in Gorky Park thinking about my place in Russia and in the world. All the things I learned about myself in Russia will stay with me forever. They have shaped the way I see myself in the world.”Shpitalnik was one of 12 students who spoke Monday evening during Destination: World, which helped kick off Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018, a program that highlights the University’s global impact.Students shared stories about the lasting imprint their trips abroad had on their career paths, their world views, and the way they see themselves, and they encouraged other students to get out of their comfort zones, explore the world, and find their passions during their time at Harvard.For Ellie Underwood ’19, a neurobiology concentrator, trips to Japan allowed her to reconnect with her family roots — her mother is from there — to learn Japanese and to start a journey of self-discovery.“I had the desire to reconnect more deeply with my heritage while at the same time figuring out what it meant to be both Japanese and American and finding my own place between these two countries,” said Underwood. “I know that my journey of discovering my own relationship to Japan will continue for the rest of my life.”,In other cases, students traveled to unfamiliar places. Maria Tirnovanu ’20, a social studies concentrator, went to South Korea without knowing the language, and fell in love with the culture.“There are things out there for each and every one of us,” said Tirnovanu, who plans to return to Korea to do her senior thesis research on social and cultural changes in the country. “Many people say going abroad is going to change your life, and that’s what happened to me.”In its second year, Worldwide Week features more than 50 events, including seminars and panel discussions, film screenings, exhibits and tours, and other programs from across all the disciplines that show the breadth of Harvard’s global engagement.“Harvard is in the world, and meaning to be very much of the world,” said Margot Gill, University marshal and administrative dean for international affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, during her opening remarks. “Harvard’s interest in the world is about what we do globally, but it’s also about what happens here in Cambridge.”Harvard’s international presence is represented both in the student body and the faculty. There are nearly 5,000 international students at Harvard, hailing from 200 countries. Harvard teaches nearly 100 languages. And 38 percent of the faculty is foreign-born.The panel discussions cover topics from press freedom in Asia to gender and sexuality in Nigeria to Islam and race, from human rights and the post-1945 international order to environmental health in Latin America. The week will feature cultural performances as well as a healthy dose of entertainment at Thursday’s International Comedy Night with stand-up comic Hari Kondabolu and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society.The program is co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs and several centers, institutes, and programs that foster research abroad. Among them are Harvard’s Asia Center, the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, the Korea Institute, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.last_img read more

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Foreign exchange students flourish at Notre Dame

first_imgAs Notre Dame students scatter across the globe to study at foreign universities, many of those universities send their own students to Notre Dame.According to the Notre Dame International (NDI) website, the University has student exchange partnerships with 12 colleges and universities in Europe and Asia. David Younger, associate director of NDI, said each university typically sends one to three students to Notre Dame per semester.Younger said the exchange programs are similar to Notre Dame’s study abroad programs: students apply and are accepted through their home universities, though Notre Dame makes the final application decision. He said each exchange partner typically sends one to three students per semester.Younger said the appeal of studying abroad at Notre Dame often stems both from the University’s academic reputation and its conventional college setting.“[It’s] a traditional American college experience — going away to college, living on campus, having athletics programs that are by and large relatively successful, ways for students to engage with faculty, ways for students to engage with the community, things that really feed into a stereotypical university experience,” he said.Exchange students can take any course for which they qualify, and with the exception of the University of East Anglia partnership (which is open only to English and American studies students)  students come to Notre Dame to study a variety of fields, Younger said.“We’ll get students from Hong Kong in both chemistry and American studies or economics, really all over the place. Engineering, even,” Younger said. “We have students from all the different disciplines.”Léa Michelin is a student at Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris (commonly referred to as Sciences Po), where all students go abroad during their third year. Michelin said she chose Notre Dame after reading other students’ reviews of the University.“What appealed to me was the familial experience, the fact that everyone seems to be so nice to each other,” Michelin said. “… I’m Catholic, so the fact that it was a Catholic school was kind of appealing too.”Michelin, who is taking classes in political science, American studies and peace studies, said she appreciates that Notre Dame professors go out of their way to help students.“It’s really different, the fact that teachers are really here to make us learn and make us love what we are doing,” she said. “I feel that they are not a distant person telling something and leaving. They’re really in the class trying to make us understand. They are much more present.”Nadège Lejeune, a second-year Master’s student at Université Paris Diderot who is completing the final year of her English degree at Notre Dame, said classes at Notre Dame are smaller and more discussion-based than in France.“Classes are very different,” she said. “At home you have a very large number of students, and you just sit down and write what the professor says. We write everything down and we don’t talk, whereas here, I’m in classes with seven people and the class is basically conversation. I was quite taken aback; it was quite difficult for me, but I’ve gotten used to it. It’s interesting to see the different ways of learning.”Michelin said one of the biggest differences she found between Notre Dame and Sciences Po was the depth of relationships.“It’s complex to have profound relationships and to be true friends with people,” she said. “It stays at the ‘what’s up’ stage. I call it the ‘what’s up relationship.’ . . . At first, when I heard ‘what’s up,’ my French reflex is to say, ‘Oh my God, I’m so tired, I have so many things to do’ — to actually talk about things that really matter. And they’re like, ‘oh yeah. Well, see you…’ Now I understand it’s another way to say hello.”Despite this, Michelin said she liked how friendly people were both in academic in social settings.“It’s quite difficult to make close friends here, but the fact is, it is really pleasant to be able to talk to everybody and never be disregarded for something,” she said.Lejeune said she was considering applying to Notre Dame for her Ph.D. and studying abroad affected her career plans.“It’s changed a lot of the things that I’ve been thinking over the past few years,” she said. “I didn’t want to teach, and now I’m considering it.”Michelin said her time at Notre Dame helped her improve her English proficiency as well as her knowledge of other cultures.“I will become much more open-minded to each person,” she said. “I will be able to speak with people really different from who I am much more easily. It’s easier now to speak to someone who is from another culture, another nationality.”Tags: foreign exchange, Notre Dame International, Sciences Po, study abroad, Université Paris Diderotlast_img read more

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Mary Tyler Moore Dies at 80

first_imgMary Tyler Moore(Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) Beloved stage and screen icon Mary Tyler Moore has died at the age of 80. Her death was confirmed to the Associated Press by her publicist. Though Moore is most known for her Emmy and Golden Globe-winning performances on The Mary Tyler Moore Show—the first series to center around a single career woman—and The Dick Van Dyke Show, she was also an active member of the theater community throughout her career as an actress, producer and animal rights activist.In 1980, Moore won a Special Tony Award for her performance in Brian Clark’s Whose Life Is It Anyway?, in which she took on the originally male role of Ken (renamed Claire). She co-hosted that year’s ceremony with Jason Robards.Moore and Bernadette Peters co-founded Broadway Barks, an annual charity event that promotes the adoption of shelter animals in New York. The “adopt-a-thon” takes place every July in Shubert Alley, where Broadway favorites assemble to showcase dogs and cats up for adoption.She was set to make her official Broadway debut in 1966 as the star of a musical adaptation of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, though the show closed in previews following out-of-town tryouts in Philadelphia and Boston. Though her stage musical career never took off, she immediately followed up the flop by appearing opposite Julie Andrews in the movie musical Thoroughly Modern Millie. Moore last appeared on Broadway as one-half of the title character in Sweet Sue (sharing the role with Lynn Redgrave) in 1987. That same year, she produced the Broadway premiere of Harvey Fierstein’s Safe Sex. Her additional producing credits through MTM Enterprises included Benefactors, Joe Egg, The Octette Bridge Club and Noises Off.Following The Mary Tyler Moore Show, its spinoff Rhoda and The Mary Tyler Moore Hour (in which she again played a fictional Mary), Moore starred in the 1980 movie Ordinary People, about a mother coping with the loss of her oldest son. She earned an Oscar nomination for her performance. In 1993, she won an Emmy for the Lifetime movie Stolen Babies. Her more recent screen appearances include guest stints on Hot in Cleveland, Lipstick Jungle and That ‘70s Show.Moore is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Levine. View Commentslast_img read more

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UGA-Tifton Graduation

first_imgThe University of Georgia Tifton campus recognized 32 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences spring and summer graduates at a special ceremony held on Sunday, April 29, at the Tifton Campus Conference Center.  UGA-Tifton students who will receive bachelor’s degrees this spring include:Joshua Aaron of Ellijay, Georgia, agricultural educationMary Allen of Adel, Georgia, agribusinessBailey Atkinson of Donalsonville, Georgia, agricultural educationLissi Carr of Hawkinsville, Georgia, agricultural educationClifton Collins of Appling, Georgia, agricultural educationJackson Fleet of Colquitt, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsJerrod Hardin of Rockmart, Georgia, agricultural educationThomas Hester of Adel, Georgia, agricultural educationEvan Hill of Lyons, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsWilliam Hinson of Jesup, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsMegan Hise of Rising Fawn, Georgia, agricultural educationNicholas Hodges of Moultrie, Georgia, agricultural educationKenneth Massey of Donalsonville, Georgia, agribusinessLevi Moore of Chula, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsDouglas Mutert of Valdosta, Georgia, agribusinessJoshua Odom of Chula, Georgia, agricultural educationKelly Paulk of Sycamore, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsPete Perrin of Chula, Georgia, agribusinessBryan Tucker of Fitzgerald, Georgia, agribusinessAshton Wheeless of Thomaston, Georgia, agricultural educationJayda Williams of Rockmart, Georgia, agricultural educationUGA-Tifton students who will receive bachelor’s degrees this summer include:Ethan Cody of Newton, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsMacey Connell of Enigma, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsJacob Kalina of Williamson, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsShelby Key of Thomson, Georgia, agricultural educationSydney Pinder of McDonough, Georgia, agricultural educationCole Thomas of Bainbridge, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsUGA-Tifton students who will receive master’s degrees this spring include:Joseph Crabtree of Tifton, Georgia, plant protection and pest managementKatrina Laurel of Tifton, Georgia, plant pathologyKristen Pegues of Fairhope, Alabama, crop and soil sciencesCatherine Summers of Tifton, Georgia, plant protection and pest managementOne UGA-Tifton student, Jeremy Taylor of Valdosta, Georgia, will receive a master’s degree in plant protection and pest management this summer.The spring graduating class is the largest to graduate from UGA-Tifton in one semester.“The UGA Tifton campus continues to produce students who are well-positioned to make a difference in the agricultural community,” said George Vellidis, director of academic programs at UGA-Tifton. “The quantity of graduates we have this semester is matched only by the quality of people our faculty and staff have had the chance to work with.”Julie Jernigan is an intern on the UGA Tifton campus.last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for May 28, 2013

first_imgYour outdoor news bulletin for May 28, the day Volkswagon was founded in 1937, eventually making the Vanagon and allowing hippies to roam free and self sufficiently across the land for decades to come:Nike Dumps LivestrongThe dominoes continue to fall in the Lance Armstrong debacle that just won’t quit. In the latest, uber-shoe company Nike has decided to severe their ties with Livestong, the cancer awareness and support organization started by Armstrong. You may have seen their yellow wristbands around, or maybe used to see them around before Lance went on Oprah. Nike had already dropped their sponsorship of the cyclist in October, and Armstrong stepped down from the board of directors around the same time. Nike’s contract with Livestrong ends in 2014, so this wraps it all up in a pretty little bow. Nike has sold some $150 million in Livestrong gear…in 2012 alone, so this may hurt their bottom line, although they will still be selling the merchandise through the holiday season.The Business of Beer…LawJason Sandford has an interesting story in the Citizen-Times profiling a group of lawyers that have dedicated their practice to the laws of the business of producing craft beer. Tough job, but someone has to do it. With all the laws and regulations surround the exploding industry of micro and craft brewing, it’s good to have a trio of  attorneys dedicated to knowing exactly those rules are and how to get around them, er, comply with them. And what better place to set up shop than in Beer City USA (at least in 2012), the hub of the craft beer movement, Asheville, N.C. which seems to have a new brewery pop up every couple of weeks. There is a very interesting discussion about the art and creative side of brewing heady beer, versus business side of well, having a business and making money. That’s where the lawyers come in, obviously.Scouts Allow Gays, Sort Of…We don’t usually delve into social issues, but this is a biggie, so it gets a mention. The Boy Scouts of America, and the recent lightning-rod issue of homosexuality in the ranks, took a step toward progression last week then they declared they would allow openly gay scouts into the ranks. The decision was made by secret ballot by 1,400 volunteer leaders from 270 councils and passed with 60 percent of the vote. The decision only applied to scouts, however, and scout leaders will still have to be as straight as a merit badge sash. This seems like a compromise of sorts and Conservative groups had a hissy fit. John Stemberger, head of the Florida Family Policy Council is quoted as saying, “Allowing openly gay scouts will mean the blunt injection of hypersexuality and gay activism into a youth organization.” Hypersexuality? As oppose to all the not-gay, teenage scouts who do such a great job keeping their hormones in check?last_img read more

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