Remembering My Morning Jacket’s “What The World Needs Now” From LOCKN’ 2016

first_imgOne of the true stand out sets from the 2016 LOCKN’ Festival was My Morning Jacket’s headlining performance, opening the eyes of many jam band fans to their true rock and roll power. Jim James and co. were in fine form throughout the night, playing hits from their catalog with a few choice surprises.Among those surprises was the live debut of Burt Bacharach’s  “What The World Needs Now Is Love,” coming at a poignant time during a heated presidential campaign season. The cover took LOCKN’ by storm, as tens of thousands sang along in unison for quite the magical moment.As we now find ourselves in times of uncertainty, let’s remember the love that My Morning Jacket brought to LOCKN’ during that moment. Watch pro-shot video of the performance below:My Morning Jacket – “What The World Needs Now”[Video: EasyMorningRebel 665]Setlist: My Morning Jacket | LOCKN’ | Arrington, VA | 8/29/16Victory Dance, Compound Fracture, Off The Record, Circuital, Steam Engine, What The World Needs Now (Burt Bacharach), Lay Low, I’m Amazed, Spring (Among the Living), State of the Art (A.E.I.O.U.) (Jim James), Phone Went West, Could You Be Loved (Bob Marley & The Wailers). Mahgeetah, Purple Rain (Prince), Wordless Chorus, Touch Me I’m Going To Scream Pt. 2, Rebel Rebel (David Bowie), One Big Holidaylast_img read more

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A data bank to battle cancer

first_imgPersonalized cancer treatment has become a holy grail of researchers, physicians, and patients. By reading the genes of individual tumors, drugs can sometimes be used against specific cells, replacing the shotgun blasts of traditional chemotherapy and radiation with treatments that are more targeted with fewer side effects.In the past several years, researchers have taken steps toward that goal, identifying specific mutations in breast, skin, blood, and other cancers and developing treatments targeting those specific cell types. Those treatments remain limited, however, leaving the majority of cancer patients still facing lengthy, draining chemotherapy and radiation regimens.Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute are seeking to improve that. The Harvard-affiliated hospitals are collaborating on a massive, long-term effort to collect and analyze tumor tissue from 10,000 cancer patients each year. Using automated gene-analysis technology, they’ll scan each tumor for nearly 500 known mutations on 41 genes.Barrett Rollins, Dana-Farber’s chief scientific officer and Linde Family Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS), said the project straddles the research and clinical worlds. It will enable researchers to understand better how different tumors behave, and it will provide an opportunity to test new therapies, even as it provides information to physicians.Though the program is just getting off the ground, Janina Longtine, associate professor of pathology at HMS, director of molecular diagnostics at the Brigham, and head of the lab conducting the analysis, said that researchers already have issued about 100 reports on tumor types that might be useful to physicians in designing cancer patients’ care.Though the study, called Profile, will initially examine tumor genes for known mutations, it also will allow more rapid testing of new treatments by providing a database of patients, their cancers’ genetic profiles, and records of what treatments have worked or not over time. If a drug company comes up with a new treatment for breast cancer, for example, rather than spending a year recruiting patients, the database could include a group of patients whose disease has failed first-line treatment, and who might be good candidates for the drug trial. Just by speeding up the process of performing clinical trials, the system aims to cut the time to market for promising treatments, Rollins said.As genetic-sequencing technology advances and becomes cheaper, researchers hope to switch from examining tumors for known mutations to scanning tumors’ entire genetic codes, which would allow researchers to look for new mutations and currently unknown weaknesses that could be targeted by future treatments.The Profile study, one of the largest of its kind in the nation, is part of a shifting cancer landscape. Not long ago, cancers were known mainly by the type of tissue in which they originated. As medical understanding of cancer biology and genetics advanced, scientists understood that cancer cells were driven not just by the tissues from which they arose, but by the mutations that, for example, caused skin cells to transform into melanoma.What had long been thought to be one type of cancer may turn out to have five, 10, or 20 subtypes, Rollins said. In addition, cancers arising in different organs have been shown to have mutations in the same genes, and may respond to similar treatments. A mutation in the B-Raf gene, which creates a protein involved in cell growth, has been found in 10 or 12 cancers.While this newfound understanding greatly complicates the view of cancer, it also provides multiple avenues through which to attack the disease.Rollins said this project is by far the most complicated he has worked on and involves 40 people. In addition to the scientific aspects, there were administrative tasks related to coordinating two major institutions (which will be joined by a third, Harvard-affiliated Children’s Hospital, in the coming months). The goal is to enroll as many cancer patients at the participating hospitals as possible, something that required study intake procedures to be incorporated into normal hospital intake procedures, while still protecting confidentiality.“There’s data in all those patients,” Rollins said. “What we wanted to do … is turn a population of 16,000 patients into a cohort we could study.”last_img read more

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Finding their place in the world

first_imgBefore traveling to Russia over the summer, Sasha Shpitalnik ’19 feared that something might go wrong with her senior thesis research on nongovernmental organizations there, or with the trip in general. But it didn’t. After more than 100 interviews, lots of connections, and plenty of sightseeing in Moscow, St. Petersburg, and Novosibirsk, Shpitalnik realized the trip had enhanced her research and changed her outlook on life.“I was scared, but I had to force myself to push through and explore the unknown,” said Shpitalnik, a government and Slavic languages and literatures concentrator. “I spent many hours in Gorky Park thinking about my place in Russia and in the world. All the things I learned about myself in Russia will stay with me forever. They have shaped the way I see myself in the world.”Shpitalnik was one of 12 students who spoke Monday evening during Destination: World, which helped kick off Worldwide Week at Harvard 2018, a program that highlights the University’s global impact.Students shared stories about the lasting imprint their trips abroad had on their career paths, their world views, and the way they see themselves, and they encouraged other students to get out of their comfort zones, explore the world, and find their passions during their time at Harvard.For Ellie Underwood ’19, a neurobiology concentrator, trips to Japan allowed her to reconnect with her family roots — her mother is from there — to learn Japanese and to start a journey of self-discovery.“I had the desire to reconnect more deeply with my heritage while at the same time figuring out what it meant to be both Japanese and American and finding my own place between these two countries,” said Underwood. “I know that my journey of discovering my own relationship to Japan will continue for the rest of my life.”,In other cases, students traveled to unfamiliar places. Maria Tirnovanu ’20, a social studies concentrator, went to South Korea without knowing the language, and fell in love with the culture.“There are things out there for each and every one of us,” said Tirnovanu, who plans to return to Korea to do her senior thesis research on social and cultural changes in the country. “Many people say going abroad is going to change your life, and that’s what happened to me.”In its second year, Worldwide Week features more than 50 events, including seminars and panel discussions, film screenings, exhibits and tours, and other programs from across all the disciplines that show the breadth of Harvard’s global engagement.“Harvard is in the world, and meaning to be very much of the world,” said Margot Gill, University marshal and administrative dean for international affairs in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, during her opening remarks. “Harvard’s interest in the world is about what we do globally, but it’s also about what happens here in Cambridge.”Harvard’s international presence is represented both in the student body and the faculty. There are nearly 5,000 international students at Harvard, hailing from 200 countries. Harvard teaches nearly 100 languages. And 38 percent of the faculty is foreign-born.The panel discussions cover topics from press freedom in Asia to gender and sexuality in Nigeria to Islam and race, from human rights and the post-1945 international order to environmental health in Latin America. The week will feature cultural performances as well as a healthy dose of entertainment at Thursday’s International Comedy Night with stand-up comic Hari Kondabolu and the Harvard College Stand-Up Comic Society.The program is co-sponsored by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Affairs and several centers, institutes, and programs that foster research abroad. Among them are Harvard’s Asia Center, the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard China Fund, the Korea Institute, the Lakshmi Mittal and Family South Asia Institute, the Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs.last_img read more

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Foreign exchange students flourish at Notre Dame

first_imgAs Notre Dame students scatter across the globe to study at foreign universities, many of those universities send their own students to Notre Dame.According to the Notre Dame International (NDI) website, the University has student exchange partnerships with 12 colleges and universities in Europe and Asia. David Younger, associate director of NDI, said each university typically sends one to three students to Notre Dame per semester.Younger said the exchange programs are similar to Notre Dame’s study abroad programs: students apply and are accepted through their home universities, though Notre Dame makes the final application decision. He said each exchange partner typically sends one to three students per semester.Younger said the appeal of studying abroad at Notre Dame often stems both from the University’s academic reputation and its conventional college setting.“[It’s] a traditional American college experience — going away to college, living on campus, having athletics programs that are by and large relatively successful, ways for students to engage with faculty, ways for students to engage with the community, things that really feed into a stereotypical university experience,” he said.Exchange students can take any course for which they qualify, and with the exception of the University of East Anglia partnership (which is open only to English and American studies students)  students come to Notre Dame to study a variety of fields, Younger said.“We’ll get students from Hong Kong in both chemistry and American studies or economics, really all over the place. Engineering, even,” Younger said. “We have students from all the different disciplines.”Léa Michelin is a student at Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris (commonly referred to as Sciences Po), where all students go abroad during their third year. Michelin said she chose Notre Dame after reading other students’ reviews of the University.“What appealed to me was the familial experience, the fact that everyone seems to be so nice to each other,” Michelin said. “… I’m Catholic, so the fact that it was a Catholic school was kind of appealing too.”Michelin, who is taking classes in political science, American studies and peace studies, said she appreciates that Notre Dame professors go out of their way to help students.“It’s really different, the fact that teachers are really here to make us learn and make us love what we are doing,” she said. “I feel that they are not a distant person telling something and leaving. They’re really in the class trying to make us understand. They are much more present.”Nadège Lejeune, a second-year Master’s student at Université Paris Diderot who is completing the final year of her English degree at Notre Dame, said classes at Notre Dame are smaller and more discussion-based than in France.“Classes are very different,” she said. “At home you have a very large number of students, and you just sit down and write what the professor says. We write everything down and we don’t talk, whereas here, I’m in classes with seven people and the class is basically conversation. I was quite taken aback; it was quite difficult for me, but I’ve gotten used to it. It’s interesting to see the different ways of learning.”Michelin said one of the biggest differences she found between Notre Dame and Sciences Po was the depth of relationships.“It’s complex to have profound relationships and to be true friends with people,” she said. “It stays at the ‘what’s up’ stage. I call it the ‘what’s up relationship.’ . . . At first, when I heard ‘what’s up,’ my French reflex is to say, ‘Oh my God, I’m so tired, I have so many things to do’ — to actually talk about things that really matter. And they’re like, ‘oh yeah. Well, see you…’ Now I understand it’s another way to say hello.”Despite this, Michelin said she liked how friendly people were both in academic in social settings.“It’s quite difficult to make close friends here, but the fact is, it is really pleasant to be able to talk to everybody and never be disregarded for something,” she said.Lejeune said she was considering applying to Notre Dame for her Ph.D. and studying abroad affected her career plans.“It’s changed a lot of the things that I’ve been thinking over the past few years,” she said. “I didn’t want to teach, and now I’m considering it.”Michelin said her time at Notre Dame helped her improve her English proficiency as well as her knowledge of other cultures.“I will become much more open-minded to each person,” she said. “I will be able to speak with people really different from who I am much more easily. It’s easier now to speak to someone who is from another culture, another nationality.”Tags: foreign exchange, Notre Dame International, Sciences Po, study abroad, Université Paris Diderotlast_img read more

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Mary Tyler Moore Dies at 80

first_imgMary Tyler Moore(Photo: Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images) Beloved stage and screen icon Mary Tyler Moore has died at the age of 80. Her death was confirmed to the Associated Press by her publicist. Though Moore is most known for her Emmy and Golden Globe-winning performances on The Mary Tyler Moore Show—the first series to center around a single career woman—and The Dick Van Dyke Show, she was also an active member of the theater community throughout her career as an actress, producer and animal rights activist.In 1980, Moore won a Special Tony Award for her performance in Brian Clark’s Whose Life Is It Anyway?, in which she took on the originally male role of Ken (renamed Claire). She co-hosted that year’s ceremony with Jason Robards.Moore and Bernadette Peters co-founded Broadway Barks, an annual charity event that promotes the adoption of shelter animals in New York. The “adopt-a-thon” takes place every July in Shubert Alley, where Broadway favorites assemble to showcase dogs and cats up for adoption.She was set to make her official Broadway debut in 1966 as the star of a musical adaptation of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, though the show closed in previews following out-of-town tryouts in Philadelphia and Boston. Though her stage musical career never took off, she immediately followed up the flop by appearing opposite Julie Andrews in the movie musical Thoroughly Modern Millie. Moore last appeared on Broadway as one-half of the title character in Sweet Sue (sharing the role with Lynn Redgrave) in 1987. That same year, she produced the Broadway premiere of Harvey Fierstein’s Safe Sex. Her additional producing credits through MTM Enterprises included Benefactors, Joe Egg, The Octette Bridge Club and Noises Off.Following The Mary Tyler Moore Show, its spinoff Rhoda and The Mary Tyler Moore Hour (in which she again played a fictional Mary), Moore starred in the 1980 movie Ordinary People, about a mother coping with the loss of her oldest son. She earned an Oscar nomination for her performance. In 1993, she won an Emmy for the Lifetime movie Stolen Babies. Her more recent screen appearances include guest stints on Hot in Cleveland, Lipstick Jungle and That ‘70s Show.Moore is survived by her husband, Dr. Robert Levine. View Commentslast_img read more

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UGA-Tifton Graduation

first_imgThe University of Georgia Tifton campus recognized 32 College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences spring and summer graduates at a special ceremony held on Sunday, April 29, at the Tifton Campus Conference Center.  UGA-Tifton students who will receive bachelor’s degrees this spring include:Joshua Aaron of Ellijay, Georgia, agricultural educationMary Allen of Adel, Georgia, agribusinessBailey Atkinson of Donalsonville, Georgia, agricultural educationLissi Carr of Hawkinsville, Georgia, agricultural educationClifton Collins of Appling, Georgia, agricultural educationJackson Fleet of Colquitt, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsJerrod Hardin of Rockmart, Georgia, agricultural educationThomas Hester of Adel, Georgia, agricultural educationEvan Hill of Lyons, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsWilliam Hinson of Jesup, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsMegan Hise of Rising Fawn, Georgia, agricultural educationNicholas Hodges of Moultrie, Georgia, agricultural educationKenneth Massey of Donalsonville, Georgia, agribusinessLevi Moore of Chula, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsDouglas Mutert of Valdosta, Georgia, agribusinessJoshua Odom of Chula, Georgia, agricultural educationKelly Paulk of Sycamore, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsPete Perrin of Chula, Georgia, agribusinessBryan Tucker of Fitzgerald, Georgia, agribusinessAshton Wheeless of Thomaston, Georgia, agricultural educationJayda Williams of Rockmart, Georgia, agricultural educationUGA-Tifton students who will receive bachelor’s degrees this summer include:Ethan Cody of Newton, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsMacey Connell of Enigma, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsJacob Kalina of Williamson, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsShelby Key of Thomson, Georgia, agricultural educationSydney Pinder of McDonough, Georgia, agricultural educationCole Thomas of Bainbridge, Georgia, agriscience and environmental systemsUGA-Tifton students who will receive master’s degrees this spring include:Joseph Crabtree of Tifton, Georgia, plant protection and pest managementKatrina Laurel of Tifton, Georgia, plant pathologyKristen Pegues of Fairhope, Alabama, crop and soil sciencesCatherine Summers of Tifton, Georgia, plant protection and pest managementOne UGA-Tifton student, Jeremy Taylor of Valdosta, Georgia, will receive a master’s degree in plant protection and pest management this summer.The spring graduating class is the largest to graduate from UGA-Tifton in one semester.“The UGA Tifton campus continues to produce students who are well-positioned to make a difference in the agricultural community,” said George Vellidis, director of academic programs at UGA-Tifton. “The quantity of graduates we have this semester is matched only by the quality of people our faculty and staff have had the chance to work with.”Julie Jernigan is an intern on the UGA Tifton campus.last_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for May 28, 2013

first_imgYour outdoor news bulletin for May 28, the day Volkswagon was founded in 1937, eventually making the Vanagon and allowing hippies to roam free and self sufficiently across the land for decades to come:Nike Dumps LivestrongThe dominoes continue to fall in the Lance Armstrong debacle that just won’t quit. In the latest, uber-shoe company Nike has decided to severe their ties with Livestong, the cancer awareness and support organization started by Armstrong. You may have seen their yellow wristbands around, or maybe used to see them around before Lance went on Oprah. Nike had already dropped their sponsorship of the cyclist in October, and Armstrong stepped down from the board of directors around the same time. Nike’s contract with Livestrong ends in 2014, so this wraps it all up in a pretty little bow. Nike has sold some $150 million in Livestrong gear…in 2012 alone, so this may hurt their bottom line, although they will still be selling the merchandise through the holiday season.The Business of Beer…LawJason Sandford has an interesting story in the Citizen-Times profiling a group of lawyers that have dedicated their practice to the laws of the business of producing craft beer. Tough job, but someone has to do it. With all the laws and regulations surround the exploding industry of micro and craft brewing, it’s good to have a trio of  attorneys dedicated to knowing exactly those rules are and how to get around them, er, comply with them. And what better place to set up shop than in Beer City USA (at least in 2012), the hub of the craft beer movement, Asheville, N.C. which seems to have a new brewery pop up every couple of weeks. There is a very interesting discussion about the art and creative side of brewing heady beer, versus business side of well, having a business and making money. That’s where the lawyers come in, obviously.Scouts Allow Gays, Sort Of…We don’t usually delve into social issues, but this is a biggie, so it gets a mention. The Boy Scouts of America, and the recent lightning-rod issue of homosexuality in the ranks, took a step toward progression last week then they declared they would allow openly gay scouts into the ranks. The decision was made by secret ballot by 1,400 volunteer leaders from 270 councils and passed with 60 percent of the vote. The decision only applied to scouts, however, and scout leaders will still have to be as straight as a merit badge sash. This seems like a compromise of sorts and Conservative groups had a hissy fit. John Stemberger, head of the Florida Family Policy Council is quoted as saying, “Allowing openly gay scouts will mean the blunt injection of hypersexuality and gay activism into a youth organization.” Hypersexuality? As oppose to all the not-gay, teenage scouts who do such a great job keeping their hormones in check?last_img read more

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Gear on the Go: April 2018 | Live Outside And Play

first_imgAfter a rushed two weeks of frantically making our metal box a livable home, we’re off on our way! Round two? Bring it on. The van is loaded down with gear, but we already have our favorites. Below is the first installment of our “Gear on the Go” where we feature our favorite pieces of gear throughout the tour. Keep an eye out every month for our picks! If something piques your interest, find us at a festival and check it out in person.NiteIze Steelie Windshield Kit+NiteIze has designed a magnetic phone management system Einstein would be proud of. The NiteIze Steelie Windshield Kit+ is one part of many different pieces of gear designed to make your life easier and safer. With the magnetic doughnut stuck to the back of your phone, a world where you don’t lose your phone between your car seats opens up. We do plenty of driving, and this windshield kit is something we rely on heavily while navigating from adventure to adventure. It allows the driver to focus and navigate themselves, leaving the passenger free to write blog posts and practice knots (although the rest of NiteIze Gear is designed so you don’t have to know any knots at all!)One part of the system suctions to the windshield (really suctions, no need to worry about this falling off), and the arm adjusts to place the phone in the best possible angle. At the end of the arm is a magnetic sphere for your phone to perch on. Between some well-placed rubber, and the strong magnets, the phone stays securely on its stand, ready to navigate you to hikes, crags and pizza. One of the nicest parts of this system is your phone isn’t directly in front of an air vent. In the summer, your phone ends up blocking the AC, and then in the winter it overheats. This system keeps it away from any airflow, landing your phone in a safe place. Bonus, it’s easy to charge your mobile device from its position on the windshield mount, making sure you have enough juice for some selfies at the summit.UCO Gear Vapor+ HeadlampIf you have made the same mistake we have and thought that all headlamps are created equally, please let us tell you all the ways that just isn’t true. The UCO Gear Vapor+ Headlamp is a step above the rest. We have ours in an extremely accessible shelf in the van, ready to grab at any second. The head strap is made of neoprene with a Precision Fit system, which makes sure the elastic never wears out or squeezes your head too tight. The velcro makes it easy to readjust when you’re switching between a bandana and a winter hat. You can power the headlamp with either regular triple A’s or a rechargeable lithium battery. Multiple options mean you don’t have to worry about being without light under the stars. Foul weather? Don’t worry, this headlamp is water resistant, it will brave the elements with you. Our favorite feature is the Infinity Dial adjustment, which allows you to zero in on the exact amount of light you want to emit. This is necessary for the perfect nighttime photography shot or moving around the van at night without waking up sleeping habitats. You can also spin this headlamp all the way and get 300+ lumens in front of you, enough to keep working throughout the night!HydraPak Seeker 3LThere are so many problems that need solving when you live in a van. How do we keep recycling together? What do we charge and when? Is this sock dirty, or can I wear it a few more times? Luckily, we have no questions concerning water storage. Using the HydraPak Seeker is intuitive in a van. Even its shape is conducive to space saving. It has tabs to hang it, measurements on the outside and know exactly how much we have left, and rolls down into its own bag when we finish it. It is easy to clean, being dishwasher safe, but also conducive to hot water and suds when a dishwasher is far, far away. It’s ultra durable and made with abrasion resistant TPU & RF welded seams. This design improves flexibility as well. You can attach a filter to the mouth and use it as a base camp water source. It can withstand a large range of water temperatures, so you can freeze water inside, or pour water up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Soup for the whole festival? All of these reasons we love it for #vanlife make it perfect for camping, hiking and backcountry adventures, too!Wenzel Tent Shennanigan 5Having shelter you can put up quickly saves more time for adventuring, partying and relaxing. This five-person tent is perfect for your next festival weekend, car camping gathering or play pretend afternoon. It uses a one pole system, so once you hammer down the stakes around the corners, you javelin into the empty tent with the single pole and now you have a living area. It has multiple vents so when the festival gets hot, your tent will stay breezy. There are organizational pockets on the sides to keep your phone separate from your blanket fort. With roll-up windows, you have the chance to let the sunlight in, or make friends with your tent neighbors. The best part of this tent is being able to put on your festival outfits without crouching on the ground. The 90-inch center height turns your tent into a professional dressing room. This simple design is perfect for a weekend away, be it to listen to tunes, or enjoy the sounds of nature.There is one way for this tour to be a reality, our sponsors! Sending a thank you shout out to our title sponsor Nite Ize, and all of our other awesome sponsors like Crazy Creek, National Geographic, Sea to Summit, Mountain House, Lowe Alpine, Old Town, Leki, HydraPak, UCO Gear and Wenzel.last_img read more

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Corrected-RBC and HMDA finalized: Now what?

first_img(I’m blaming it on a lack of coffee. A previous Version of this blog references HAMDA. I Know its HMDA)Yesterday was the type of day I love, because it means that there will be a need for bank attorneys for years to come. Not only did the NCUA finalize its risk-based capital regulations, but the CFPB finalized regulations that greatly increase the amount of data that credit unions subject to HMDA requirements must collect. In full disclosure, I have not yet gotten through the hundreds of pages of either proposal, and even if I had there is a year’s worth of material worth talking about. Nevertheless, here is my first attempt at highlighting which aspects of these new regulations are most important.Let’s start with the risk-based capital regulations. It largely tracks the changes that NCUA proposed when it reissued these proposed regulations. Most importantly, it applies to credit unions with $100 million or more in assets. NCUA will be periodically examining this threshold. The regulation takes effect January 1, 2019. NCUA estimates that 16 credit unions will have to make balance sheet adjustments or get more capital to comply with RBC requirements. continue reading » 9SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Zagreb received a new mobile application that combines culture and tourism – Greetings from Zagreb

first_imgGreetings from Zagreb or Greetings from Zagreb is the first mobile application created at the National and University Library in Zagreb as a result of many years of work of the Library in digitization, the establishment of a digital library and the creation of virtual exhibitions. The user’s application takes you on a historical walk to the ten most attractive city locations, and with the walk it reveals their past, can send personalized digital postcards and discover more about the spirit of Zagreb through other functionalities that the application offers.Made in the National and University Library in Zagreb, with the technical design of the Blue Factory and with the support of the Zagreb Tourist Board, it is a unique cultural and tourist product that combines old maps, postcards, photographs and expert knowledge of the cultural heritage of the Croatian capital. “With the Greeting from Zagreb project, we wanted to create an innovative digital product that connects tourism and cultural heritage and promotes the beauties of our capital recorded on postcards from the collection of the Graphic Collection of the National and University Library in Zagreb ”she said at the presentation of Dr. sc. Sofija Klarin Zadravec, conceptual initials of the application.This is the first mobile application of the National and University Library in Zagreb, but also of Croatian libraries in general, which is part of the new cultural and tourist offer of the Republic of Croatia and the City of Zagreb. One of the goals of the application is to show how connected culture and tourism are and how heritage institutions can contribute to strengthening the Croatian economy by using modern technological solutions.The mobile application Greetings from Zagreb is easy to use, and is accompanied by an interesting portal Greetings from Zagreb. “After the user downloads the application, he can choose an old or new map of the city and walk around Zagreb exploring the ten most beautiful locations. It can send or share as many as 50 postcards with family or friends. We made the application so that it is interesting for those who are not in Zagreb, because they can see how the city has changed in a unique combination of images Once & Now as well as in the gallery with 150 old postcards of Zagreb from the late 19th and early 20th century”Explained Dragana Koljenik from the Croatian Institute of Librarianship NSK.The application is available on Android devices, as well as in Croatian and English and is free for users, and can be downloaded at Google play and microspaces Greetings from Zagreb.last_img read more

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