County Officials Approve Permit For 2-Day Dead & Company Festival In Wyoming

first_imgToday, Jackson Hole News & Guide broke the news that the Board of Teton County Commissioners have unanimously approved a permit that would allow Dead & Company to host a two-day festival at Jackson Hole Hereford Ranch in the summer during a special meeting called for the application’s review. Late last month, James Deighan, owner of Highline Sports and Entertainment, filed the approved application for the permit for the two-day concert that would take place in South Park, WY, on August 18th and 19th. In his application, Deighan estimated that 15,000 – 20,000 people would attend.However, as noted by Jackson Hole News & Guide, while the permit was approved, the commissioners green-lighted the festival only with the caveat that Highline Sports and Entertainment submit a detailed security and traffic plan by April 1st as well other mitigation plans by May 1st. Other conditions for the festival’s approval included that the county staff’s daily workload would not be “unduly impacted by planning for the event.” The board also noted that, rather than the proposed end time of 10 p.m. each night, they were interested in the music ending at 9 p.m., and that they’d like to make sure that locals have prioritized access to tickets.However, while the Dead & Company festival has secured the necessary permits from the county, this does not mean that the concert is guaranteed to happen. At the initial hearing, Deighan noted, “The only caveat is we are up against a little bit of time…to properly plan this event and execute it in the proper fashion that not only the town deserves but the event itself as well.” Today, Deighan explained to Jackson Hole News & Guide ahead of the county’s special meeting to approve the permit, “If in fact we do move forward today as a group, that doesn’t mean we’re hitting the go button.”last_img read more

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Zeroing in on long-term weight loss

first_img Researchers with widely varying views on dietary guidelines come to a consensus The studyParticipants were first placed on a diet to lose about 12 percent of their starting weight (weight loss averaged 25 pounds) to kickstart metabolic changes. The next phase randomly assigned the 164 participants who achieved this loss to one of three test groups:High (60 percent) carbohydrate and low (20 percent) fat diet;Moderate (40 percent) carbohydrate and (40 percent) fat diet;Low (20 percent) carbohydrate and high (60 percent) fat diet.The protein amount was the same in all groups, at 20 percent. Total calories were adjusted up or down in each participant to prevent any weight changes. All meals were provided to the participants during the weight-loss phase and throughout the 20-week test phase. The types of foods in each diet group were designed to be as similar as possible, but varying in amounts: The high-carbohydrate group ate more whole grains, fruits, legumes, and low-fat dairy products, while the low-carbohydrate group ate more fat but eliminated all grains and some fruits and legumes.After participants followed the diets for 20 weeks the researchers measured their total energy expenditure. They found that participants in all groups maintained their weight, and there was minimal difference in secondary measures, including physical activity and resting energy expenditure (factors that could independently increase total energy expenditure).The findingsThe low-carbohydrate group showed an increased energy expenditure, with a range of 209‒278 calories/day, compared with the high-carbohydrate group.The moderate-carbohydrate group showed a smaller increase in expenditure of about 100 calories compared with the high carbohydrate group. This trend was consistent throughout the 20-week period.The increased metabolic effect with the low-carbohydrate diet was most significant in people who had high insulin secretion at the start of the study, with an increased energy expenditure of 308‒478 calories/day. (People with high insulin secretion tend to be shaped more like apples than pears, with excess body fat stored predominantly around the midsection.) This finding supports recent research to suggest that differences in biology may affect how people respond to weight-loss diets over the long term.A hormone that works to increase appetite, ghrelin, decreased significantly on the low-carbohydrate diet, which could help with weight-loss maintenance. Another appetite-regulating hormone, leptin, also decreased. Leptin regulates energy balance and works to keep body weight stable. It typically counteracts ghrelin by sending signals to the brain to suppress appetite when the body has enough food.Previously, high leptin levels were thought to lower appetite and signal the body to begin using stored fat for energy. However, some forms of obesity/overweight may lead to “leptin resistance” where there are high levels of leptin. In this scenario, the brain does not receive an alert that leptin levels are already high, so it continues to send strong hunger signals while conserving body fat stores. In other words, high leptin levels may promote leptin resistance. Its significance in the BMJ study was that the lower carbohydrate diet appeared to improve leptin sensitivity by reducing high levels of leptin.“This study raises the possibility that a focus on restricting carbohydrates, rather than calories, may work better for long-term weight control,” said David Ludwig, professor in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, who led the study with Cara Ebbeling from Boston Children’s Hospital.Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard Chan School, who was not involved in the study, noted that, “These findings from a carefully conducted investigation can help explain why low-fat/high-carbohydrate diets are not successful for most people and have failed to maintain weight loss in formal randomized trials that have lasted for one year or longer.”This story originally appeared on the Harvard Chan School’s website, The Nutrition Source.This work was conducted with grants from Nutrition Science Initiative (made possible by gifts from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation and Robert Lloyd Corkin Charitable Foundation), New Balance Foundation, Many Voices Foundation, and Blue Cross Blue Shield. David S. Ludwig was supported by a mid-career mentoring award from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (K24DK082730). Related Good fat vs. bad fat vs. high carb vs. low carb Losing weight is hard work, but many people who have lost weight may agree that keeping it off can be an even greater challenge.A lack of self-control or a few too many dietary indulgences are often cited as reasons for regaining weight. But a new study in the November issue of BMJ questions this conventional view, finding that the type of calories you consume may influence how likely you are to keep that weight off for the long term.The human body is designed to protect itself when it sheds weight, whether voluntarily or involuntarily, by increasing the urge to eat while slowing down the metabolism and more efficiently storing fat. Although it may be exciting to see the numbers on the scale drop, this makes it harder to keep losing weight or even maintain weight loss.The purpose of the BMJ study was to see if different levels of carbohydrates in the diet could prevent these metabolic changes from occurring, so that weight lost might stay off. The focus on carbohydrates was based on the carbohydrate-insulin model of obesity, which holds that high insulin levels that result from eating a high glycemic load diet (i.e., highly processed carbohydrates like refined breads, crackers, cookies, and sugars) cause energy from the food to be stored more easily as fat, and may increase hunger and food cravings, lower energy expenditure, and promote weight gain. “This study raises the possibility that a focus on restricting carbohydrates, rather than calories, may work better for long-term weight control.” — David Ludwiglast_img read more

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Using Smart Design to Reduce E-Waste

first_imgThere’s a reason I like designers: they tend to think big picture (pun intended). Dell’s Sr. VP of Experience Design, Ed Boyd, is a good example. In a recent piece he wrote for Triple Pundit, Ed talks about how smart up-front design strategies are critical to the end of life for our IT products. Rather than having a beautiful product or an environmentally friendly one, Ed says you should have both.He takes his engineers to visit with recyclers, learning what frustrates them, what slows them down, and what simply doesn’t work. This is a regular field trip he takes his designers on, where they learn things like having laptop cases open from the bottom instead of the top to speed up dismantling, or incorporating icons, pictures and videos into repair manuals so technicians do not have to pause to read detailed instructions.Dell engineers and design architects witness how a recycling facility receives, tests and sorts Dell products during a recent field trip.Ed also points to modularity as another key, sharing the example of creating a single access door for all major components. He also cites Dutch cell phone maker Fairphone and their plug-and-play design for the Fairphone 2. The company was featured in Dell’s Legacy of Good Short Film Contest this past year.And it’s not just how you manipulate the product.“[It] turns out ‘trash’ can be a workable and cost-effective material for designers,” explained Boyd.He talks about how Adidas is making shoes out of ocean plastic and notes that he is exploring the waste material for packaging design at Dell.All of these examples of big-picture thinking demonstrate how cutting-edge designers like Ed are making the environment a priority when they design. “We owe it to our customers, our communities and our planet to continue pushing the boundaries of what’s possible with design.”Boyd’s article can be found at Triple Pundit. Read more about Dell’s innovative approaches to design and materials sourcing, at www.dell.com/circulareconomy.last_img read more

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Rivers breaking banks in Germany as more snow falls

first_imgBERLIN (AP) — Authorities in Germany have warned of flooding in the west of the country Saturday as meltwater pushes rivers to break their banks. Shipping was halted on the Rhine at Karlsruhe, and in Wissen southeast of Cologne four men had to be rescued after their inflatable boat capsized in swollen rapids. In Buedingen, east of Frankfurt, residents tried to salvage belongings from the mud swept in by a foot-high surge of water overnight. Unseasonably warm weather and rain have accelerated snowmelt in parts of Switzerland and Germany in recent days. Meanwhile, fresh snow disrupted rail traffic in large parts of northern Germany, cutting off connections to Bremen, Kiel and Luebeck overnight.last_img read more

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Senators Borrello, O’Mara Share Concerns Over Cuomo’s Proposed Budget

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Pictured in the state Senate Chamber, from left to right: Dunkirk Mayor Willie Rosas; Corning City Council member Alison Hunt; Olean Mayor William J. Aiello; Corning Mayor William Boland; Senator Tom O’Mara; Rosita Rosas, City of Dunkirk; Senator George Borrello; Corning City Manager Mark Ryckman and Jamestown Mayor Edward Sundquist. Image by Senator George Borrello’s Office.ALBANY – Local leaders from across New York State traveled to Albany last week for a meeting of the New York Conference of Mayors and to directly share their concerns with state legislators on Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposed New York State budget.The governor unveiled his Executive budget proposal in late January and the Legislature’s fiscal committees have been conducting public hearings on the $178-billion plan over the past several weeks.State Senator George Borrello and Senator Tom O’Mara met several local officials from their respective legislative districts.In a joint statement, O’Mara and Borrello shared their concerns about the Governor proposed budget over the potential cost shifts in Medicaid, new unfunded state mandates, and funding cuts in numerous areas, including local roads and bridges. “We agree that the Cuomo budget plan, as it stands, risks putting a heavier burden on local governments and local property taxpayers, who are already at the breaking point in fundamental ways,” the Senators said. “Consequently, we appreciate many of the local officials we represent raising their voices and we will continue to work closely with them to protect our local communities and property taxpayers from unreasonable and unfair state efforts to pass the buck on fiscal responsibility.”The two stressed that they would keep working with their legislative colleagues across the Southern Tier and Finger Lakes regions to keep attention focused on unfunded state mandates, a stronger commitment to Aid and Incentives for Municipalities to support local municipalities and property taxpayers, job-killing state regulations, out-of-control debt, public safety, and a state tax burden that hurts family budgets and keeps New York’s business climate one of the worst in the nation.Local officials attending the conference from Senator Borrello’s 57th Senate District were: Dunkirk Mayor Willie Rosas, Olean Mayor William J. Aiello, and Jamestown Mayor Edward Sundquist. Officials from Senator O’Mara’s 58th Senate District were: Corning Mayor Bill Boland, Corning City Manager Mark Ryckman and Corning City Councilmember Alison Hunt.last_img read more

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Bar Web site to be upgraded

first_img B ar Web site to be upgraded Plan would allow more member information to be included Bar members may soon be able to list more information about themselves on the Bar Web site’s information pages about individual members.Communications Committee Chair Kim Bald recently reported to the Board of Governors the committee hopes to allow members to add expanded information about themselves and their law firms by summer.Currently, when a member of the public uses the Web site’s Find a Lawyer function, only basic information is displayed, including the lawyer’s address, that he or she is a member in good standing, year admitted, whether the lawyer is certified, and sections and committees membership.Bald said the Communications Committee wants to expand that portion of the Web site information, similar to what the State Bar of Texas does.At its meeting the day before the board met, the committee received a presentation from Bar staff on what information could be added and how that would be done.Information included areas of practice, law school attended, size of the law firm, what other state bars the lawyer is admitted to, languages spoken at the office, federal courts where the lawyer is admitted, and other services that are offered by the firm.A lawyer would also be able to list his or her firm’s site address, although as presently planned it would not be a “clickable” link.The program would be set up so Bar members could log in to the Bar’s Web site to provide and update information themselves.Public Information Director Francine Walker said allowing the additional information proved very popular in Texas, where about 94 percent of its members have taken advantage of the service. Bar Web site to be upgraded April 1, 2006 Regular Newslast_img read more

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PCM goes old school against a new threat

first_imgPCM Credit Union($269.3M, Green Bay, WI) is banking on 100 years of credit union history to do its best for its tight-knit membership during the COVID-19 pandemic.Founded in 1958 as Paper Machine Converting Company Credit Union, PCM has added only a handful of SEGs to its original field, maintaining a common bond focus that its president of more than 30 years says has served it and its members well.“We’ve never been about growth,” Dan Wollin says. “We’ve always been about service. That’s as important now as ever.”PCM has taken a number of steps to respond to the pandemic. It has sent staffers home to work and closed the lobbies of its two full-service branches while maintaining drive-thru service. It also has temporarily shuttered its third branch located inside a SEG’s facility. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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India’s Modi promotes yoga against coronavirus

first_imgIndian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has extolled yoga as a way of building a “protective shield” of immunity against the coronavirus, as his nation battles a surge in infections.Modi, a keen yoga practitioner who has long espoused the benefits of the ancient Indian practice, gave the advice in a YouTube message ahead of World Yoga Day on Sunday.”We all know that until now nowhere in the world have they been able to develop a vaccine for COVID-19 or coronavirus,” Modi said in the video published Thursday. Modi also hailed yoga as a way to ease the extraordinary stresses people are enduring because of the virus.”Yoga has the potential to cater to the mental, physical and psychological challenges. It puts to test how one can live in challenging times,” he said.In January, the Ministry of AYUSH (Ayurveda, Yoga & Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha, Sowa Rigpa and Homoeopathy) released an advisory on how ancient homeopathy and Ayurveda remedies could help Indians combat the coronavirus.But experts, including the US’ National Institutes of Health, have warned that “no scientific evidence that any of these alternative remedies can prevent or cure COVID-19”.India’s national and state governments have also stressed the importance of mask-wearing and social distancing.The South Asian nation of 1.3 billion people is the fourth worst-hit country in the world with more than 380,000 virus infections, official figures show.Topics : “Which is why right now, only a strong immunity can act as a protective shield or a bodyguard for us and our family members… yoga is our trusted friend in building this protective shield (of immunity).”The Indian leader, a teetotal vegetarian, set up a ministry to promote yoga, Ayurveda and other traditional Indian treatments when he came to power in 2014.Modi initially proposed World Yoga Day to the United Nations, winning approval in 2014. The day normally see masses of people gather for public yoga events not only in India but worldwide but Modi called for people to this year “go indoors”.  last_img read more

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Lady Bulldogs Fall To Lady Wildcats In Softball

first_imgThe Batesville Bulldogs softball team hosted the conference leading Franklin County Wildcats Wednesday night with yet again a fairly strong defensive performance minus a couple lapses in judgement. Unfortunately, the Bulldogs were unable to generate any activity with their bats for the second night in a row! The Bulldogs fell to The Wildcats 8-0!Leading the Bulldogs in hitting were Ellie Waechter & Sierra Cornn both going 1-3.The Bulldogs will host Greensburg tonight at 5p. The Bulldogs are now 3-11 on the season, 2-6 in conference play.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Todd Reed.last_img read more

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State officials release 2018 Primary Election stats

first_imgIndianapolis, In. — Secretary of State Connie Lawson announced today that according to the official canvass of primary election returns recently certified by the Election Division, 20 percent, or 870,336 of Indiana’s 4.4 million registered voters cast a vote in the May 8 Primary Election. The complete 2018 Primary Election Turnout and Absentee Chart with voter statistics for each county can be viewed online at https://www.in.gov/sos/elections/files/Election_Turnout_and_Registration_20180608_124613PM.pdf. The report was compiled by the Secretary of State’s office using voter data gathered in Indiana’s 92 counties.Voter turnout in the 2018 primary represents a significant increase from the 2014 midterms and is comparable to the 2010 midterm primary. In 2014, 13 percent of registered Hoosiers voted in the primary election. In 2010, 21 percent of Hoosiers voted in the primary. In contrast, Iowa’s Des Moines Register is boasting that, “Iowans busted the voter turnout record” earlier this month with 13.1 percent.“Candidates and issues continue to drive turnout in elections,” said Secretary of State Connie Lawson. “Contested statewide and county races across the state brought voters from both parties out in significant numbers, and thanks to the preparations made by clerks and election administrators in all 92 counties, Indiana’s reputation for safe and efficient elections continues.”Jay County boasted the highest turnout of any Indiana county with 57 percent. There were multiple contested races on the Jay County ballot, driving turnout up. Following Jay were Crawford County (38 percent), Daviess County (35 percent), Fountain County (35 percent), and Jackson County (35 percent).Early voting continues to gain popularity. In 2010, early voting was at 11 percent for the primary election. It grew to 16 percent in 2014. This year, it reached 20 percent. Hoosiers are taking advantage of options the state has provided to make voting easier.Turnout statistics for previous elections can be found online at www.in.gov/sos/elections/2983.htm.last_img read more

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