TICKETS for Saints next fixture – their trip to L

first_imgTICKETS for Saints’ next fixture – their trip to Leeds Rhinos on Monday May 20 – are now on sale.The match kicks off at 7.45pm and is the first Monday night fixture of the season.They are priced at (standing) Adult – £20, Concession (65+) – £13, Student – £13 and Junior (Under 16) – £12.Seated prices are Adult – £27, Concession (65+) – £19, Student – £19 and Junior (Under 16) – £18Junior Season Ticket Holders MUST collect a voucher 48 hours in advance of matchday.Coach travel is also available – prices are £11 for season ticket holders and £12 for non.To buy, log on to the Saints Superstore, call into the Ticket Office at Langtree Park or telephone 01744 455 052.last_img read more

Read More »

He took his seasons tally to six whilst Mark Perc

first_imgHe took his season’s tally to six whilst Mark Percival and Luke Thompson both added four-pointers to lift Saints clear at the top of the table.It brought Justin Holbrook’s side their third win in eight days – but more importantly proved they could once again cope with adversity.Ben Barba was ruled out with illness in the build up to the game – James Roby injured in the second half.Saints dominated the first half and probably should have been further ahead than 6-0 at oranges.After Jonny Lomax went close on an arcing run, Theo Fages chipped over to the charging Taia who made no mistake in plucking it out of the air to get Saints on the board.Richardson added the extras before, on 15 minutes, Hull had one chalked off for a knock on.Saints had dominated up until that point but back to back penalties had allowed the visitors the chance to build pressure.Holbrook’s men defended their lines desperately and won a drop out, but Lomax couldn’t take Roby’s bullet pass to increase the lead.Up the other end of the field, Jordan Lane lost the ball over the line on the half hour mark and then a group tackle forced the ball out of the grasp of Jake Connor as the half came to a close.Saints extended their lead just two minutes into the second half.After Hull knocked on following Fages’ tricky kick to the corner, the ball came right from the scrum and Lomax caught Percival on a fantastic line.Richardson added the conversion and then tagged on a penalty on 50 minutes after Connor was caught for lifting.Hull did get on the scoreboard ten minutes later – Albert Kelly taking probably the most forward pass you will ever see to get his side back into it.Thompson had one chalked off for a knock-on on 60 minutes-  but Taia grabbed his second seven minutes later when Smith and Fages combined on the last.Thompson finally got the nod from the video referee after great work from LMS as the game entered its final stages before Chris Green crossed for a scant consolation.Match Summary:Saints: Tries: Taia (2), Percival, Thompson Goals: Richardson (5 from 5)Hull FC: Tries: Kelly, Green Goals: Sneyd (2 from 2)Penalties Awarded: Saints: 4 Hull FC: 5HT: 6-0 FT: 26-12REF: R HicksATT: 10,408Teams:Saints: 1. Jonny Lomax; 2. Tommy Makinson, 3. Ryan Morgan, 4. Mark Percival, 19. Regan Grace; 6. Theo Fages, 18. Danny Richardson; 10. Kyle Amor, 9. James Roby, 16. Luke Thompson, 17. Dom Peyroux, 11. Zeb Taia, 12. Jon Wilkin. Subs: 7. Matty Smith, 13. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 14. Luke Douglas, 15. Morgan Knowles.Hull FC: 1. Jamie Shaul; 24. Jack Logan, 4. Josh Griffin, 3. Carlos Tuimavave, 5. Fetuli Talanoa; 6. Albert Kelly, 7. Marc Sneyd; 8. Scott Taylor, 9. Danny Houghton, 23. Mickey Paea, 17. Danny Washbrook, 26. Jordan Lane, 20. Brad Fash. Subs: 13. Josh Bowden, 14. Jake Connor, 15. Chris Green, 16. Jordan Abdull.last_img read more

Read More »

Photos Swiss women stage mass strike demanding overdue equality

first_img City councilwoman Karin Rykart gives a speech to the participants of the women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at Muensterhof Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann People hold a banner during a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse Women walk past a banner reading “Up with women’s pay, away with the big cats, for communism” during the women’s strike (Frauenstreik) in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann A tape labeled “Closed because of women’s strike/feminist strike” is placed in front of the University of Zurich, in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann People protest with a sit-in on a bridge during a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse City councilwoman Karin Rykart gives a speech to the participants of the women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at Muensterhof Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann 1 of 22 WhatsApp People attend a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. The placard reads, “We have enough”. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse People protest with a sit-in on a bridge during a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse A banner reading “More pay. More time. More respect. We women strike.” is seen during a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann The traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann A sticker renaming the Charles Bessieres bridge “Passerelle Nicole Niquille” is pictured during a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse Placards are seen as people attend a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse The traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmanncenter_img Teachers and mothers of pupils take part in a strike in front of the Aemtler school in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann A tape labeled with the slogan “Closed because of women’s strike/feminist strike” is stretched across the street as the traffic is blocked by the participants of the women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann People attend a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse A woman wears a t-shirt showing the date of the women’s strike (Frauenstreik) as she takes part in the strike in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd WIegmann <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a> Protests carry placards as they attend a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse The traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann The traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd WiegmannThe traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann Protests carry placards as they attend a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouse Women across Switzerland held a strike on Friday to highlight their wealthy nation’s poor record on female rights, recreating the passion of the first such walkout 28 years ago.In Lausanne, chanting protesters gathered at midnight outside the cathedral tower, whose bell was illuminated in purple, the official colour of the protest.Blowing whistles and banging pots and pans, hundreds of demonstrators – mostly women but also men – carried placards reading “no means no”, “I am not a princess but the woman I choose to be”, and “don’t free me, I’ll do that myself”.Protesters marched through the streets of Zurich, the Swiss financial capital. “Men, go do the ironing,” one sign read.Despite its high quality of life, Switzerland lags other developed economies in female pay and workplace gender equality.Friday’s event echoed a strike in 1991, five years before the Gender Equality Act came into force. That banned workplace discrimination and sexual harassment and protected women from bias or dismissal over pregnancy, marital status, or gender.But more than 20 years later, women still earn less than men, face routine questioning of their competence, and encounter condescension and paternalism on the job, they say.Organisers say the strike draws attention to wages, recognition of care work, violence against women, and the need for greater representation in positions of power and more equitable family policy.“THINGS DIDN’T CHANGE”Swiss women earn roughly 20% less than men. While that is an improvement from about a third less in 1991, the discrimination gap — meaning differences that cannot be explained by rank or role — has actually worsened since 2000, government data show.On June 14, 1991, women blocked trams during a sit-in in the heart of Zurich’s financial district and gathered outside schools, hospitals and across cities with purple balloons and banners to demand equal pay for equal work.That came a decade after basic gender equality was enshrined in the Swiss constitution and less than three months after women for the first time were allowed to participate in a regional vote in the canton of Appenzell Innerrhoden.“We have realised that even after this first strike in 1991, things didn’t really change. Equality is enshrined in the Constitution, but real, material, effective equality doesn’t exist for all women,” said organiser Tamara Knezevic, 24.“We have so many demands and so many reasons to create this large, popular protest front of women because all these laws, all that we have obtained, we haven’t really obtained it for good.”An annual study by the World Economic Forum has found global progress on gender equality stagnating. Switzerland ranked 34th for economic participation and opportunity and 44th for wage equality in the 2018 study of 149 countries.Christine Croset, a teacher trainer, complained that too many jobs traditionally assigned to women are not rewarded properly, while a glass ceiling capped their advancement.“Nothing is fine, and we have been waiting for too long now,” she said. The traffic is blocked by the participants of a women’s strike (Frauenstreik) at the Central Square in Zurich, Switzerland June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Arnd Wiegmann SharePrint A woman smiles at the start of a day-long and nationwide women’s strike aimed at highlighting the country’s poor record on defending the rights of women and families, in Lausanne, Switzerland, June 14, 2019. REUTERS/Denis Balibouselast_img read more

Read More »