Pattern Energy moves forward with massive wind farm in New Mexico

first_imgPattern Energy moves forward with massive wind farm in New Mexico FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Albuquerque Journal:One of the nation’s largest wind farms could soon be operating near the Village of Corona.Pattern Energy Group bought the rights in late May to a planned 1,000 megawatt wind farm just north of Corona, along with a 140-mile transmission project to carry wind-generated electricity from Corona to Public Service Co. of New Mexico’s Rio Puerco substation west of Albuquerque.Development company Clean Line Energy Partners spent about six years planning the Western Spirit transmission system and its related Mesa Canyons Wind Farm as a combined $1.5 billion project that Pattern acquired for an undisclosed price.Clean Line advanced the projects enough for construction to begin next year, said Pattern CEO Mike Garland. “Mesa Canyons will be one of the biggest wind farms in the U.S.,” Garland said. “We’re confident we’ll have both projects done by the end of 2020.”Western Spirit could be the first new line to begin operations among several large-scale developments now underway in New Mexico. That includes the 520-mile SunZia power line projected to carry up to 3,000 MW of electricity to western markets. Pattern Energy is the anchor tenant for SunZia. It plans to develop another 2,200 MW of generation through its Corona Wind project, to be built in stages in Torrance, Lincoln and Guadalupe counties for transport by SunZia to California and elsewhere.Pattern already operates a 324 MW facility known as the Broadview Wind farm north of Clovis. It will also break ground this summer on the Grady Wind Center, a 221 MW project just east of Broadview.More: Pattern Energy harnesses NM’s blustery gustslast_img read more

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Federal official says founding fathers intended for all lands to be sold

first_imgFederal official says founding fathers intended for all lands to be sold FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Washington Post ($):President Trump’s pick for managing federal lands doesn’t think the federal government should have any.This week, Interior Secretary David Bernhardt signed an order making Wyoming native William Perry Pendley the acting director of the Bureau of Land Management. Pendley, former president of the Mountain States Legal Foundation, was a senior official in President Ronald Reagan’s administration.The appointment comes as a critical time for the BLM, which manages more than a tenth of the nation’s land and oversees the federal government’s oil, gas and coal leasing program. Two weeks ago, Interior officials announced that the department would reassign 84 percent of the bureau’s D.C. staff out West by the end of next year. Only a few dozen employees, including Pendley, would remain in Washington.After more than 2 ½ years in office, Trump has yet to nominate a permanent director for the BLM. By placing Pendley in charge of the agency, Bernhardt has installed a longtime crusader for curtailing the federal government’s control of public lands.In the three decades since serving under Reagan, Pendley has sued the Interior Department on behalf of an oil and gas prospector, sought to undermine protections of endangered species such as the grizzly bear and pressed to radically reduce the size of federal lands to make way for development.“The Founding Fathers intended all lands owned by the federal government to be sold,” he wrote approvingly in a National Review magazine article in 2016. “Westerners know that only getting title to much of the land in the West will bring real change,” he said……“By fixing this pivotal deal in 1984 — and getting away with it — Mr. Pendley may be one of the most important faceless functionaries in the expansion of coal use in the United States,” said Tom Sanzillo, director of finance at the Institute for Energy Economics & Financial Analysis, in an email. He said the report showed “a much wider pattern of high ranking employees and administration officials cutting deals with the industry without regard for laws.”As a result, he said, “billions of tons of coal could come to market from the Powder River Basin for the next now 40 plus years at below market prices due to what was done at the time.”More: Trump’s pick for managing federal lands doesn’t believe the government should have anylast_img read more

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Trade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021

first_imgTrade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):LNG developers “need to brace themselves for a continued glut” in world gas markets with rising supplies potentially outpacing demand growth for another two years, the International Gas Union said in an April 27 outlook.“This will mean continued depressed prices,” said the International Gas Union, or IGU. “This is then likely followed by a period of recovery, with renewed uncertainty around the middle of the decade.”The 42.5 million tonnes per annum of worldwide liquefaction capacity that came online in 2019 is expected to extend the oversupply into the mid- to late 2020s, significantly longer than the forecast issued just a year ago by the IGU, which represents all sectors in the gas value chain. If Qatar moves forward with its North Field LNG expansion, which the industry group described as one of the world’s most cost-competitive projects, another 49 mtpa of supply could come online between 2024 and 2027, causing the global glut to last another couple of years.The market was oversupplied even before coronavirus pandemic began hitting world demand, with the global liquefaction capacity reaching about 430.5 mtpa by the end of 2019, the IGU reported. LNG prices slumped as rising supplies, especially from the U.S., met weaker-than-expected demand in a mild winter. But the pandemic made the situation worse as lockdowns imposed by world governments to control the spread of the coronavirus hit commercial and industrial demand for gas.New additions of LNG production capacity in 2020 are expected to reach 24.35 mtpa. In the U.S., new liquefaction units are in the late stages of commissioning at the Freeport LNG Development LP facility in Texas, Kinder Morgan Inc.’s Elba Island LNG plant in Georgia, and the Sempra Energy-led Cameron LNG terminal in Louisiana.“The current market environment lowers the expectations of seeing a recovery in prices any time before the coming winter,” the IGU reported.[Corey Paul]More ($): LNG glut to persist years longer than previously thought, industry group sayslast_img read more

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South Korean president vows to close half of nation’s coal plants by 2034

first_imgSouth Korean president vows to close half of nation’s coal plants by 2034 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Power Magazine:South Korea’s president said the country will shutter 30 more coal-fired power plants by 2034, and bring additional solar and wind power resources online in the next five years in order to meet emissions reductions targets.President Moon Jae-in made the announcement Sept. 8 in a speech he delivered virtually for the United Nations’ International Day for Clean Air for blue skies event. The president said his administration will close 10 of those operating coal-fired plants by the end of 2022. He also has called for the country to phase out nuclear power.South Korea has about 60 operating coal plants, which generate about 40% of the country’s electricity. The country over the past three years has implemented temporary shutdowns of plants that are more than 30 years old, including idling about half the coal-fired fleet earlier this year in an effort to reduce air pollution.Jae-in also said South Korea will more than triple the number of operating solar and wind power installations by 2025, compared with the number online as of 2019. The country also will provide incentives to increase the number of electric vehicles on its roads to 1.13 million, up from the current 110,000, and to increase the number of hydrogen-powered vehicles to 200,000, up from the current 8,000.“The government will work with the people to bring back the blue skies with more powerful environmental policies,” Jae-in said. The president said the targets announced Monday are in line with his administration’s goals to produce more energy from low-carbon sources, and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.Jae-in’s administration has ended construction of any new coal-fired power plants—the country in 2017, the year Jae-in took office, reached a new high for coal-fired power generation—while supporting renewable energy resources, including the use of fuel cells. He said in his speech Monday that climate change has become “the most important problem in our generation,” noting the country has been hit with three major typhoons in a two-week period in late August and early September. He emphasized that the country needs clean air, in part to help combat the coronavirus pandemic, and also to promote economic growth.[Darrell Proctor]More: South Korea will close half its coal-fired fleetlast_img read more

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Daily Dirt: Outdoor News for May 28, 2013

first_imgYour outdoor news bulletin for May 28, the day Volkswagon was founded in 1937, eventually making the Vanagon and allowing hippies to roam free and self sufficiently across the land for decades to come:Nike Dumps LivestrongThe dominoes continue to fall in the Lance Armstrong debacle that just won’t quit. In the latest, uber-shoe company Nike has decided to severe their ties with Livestong, the cancer awareness and support organization started by Armstrong. You may have seen their yellow wristbands around, or maybe used to see them around before Lance went on Oprah. Nike had already dropped their sponsorship of the cyclist in October, and Armstrong stepped down from the board of directors around the same time. Nike’s contract with Livestrong ends in 2014, so this wraps it all up in a pretty little bow. Nike has sold some $150 million in Livestrong gear…in 2012 alone, so this may hurt their bottom line, although they will still be selling the merchandise through the holiday season.The Business of Beer…LawJason Sandford has an interesting story in the Citizen-Times profiling a group of lawyers that have dedicated their practice to the laws of the business of producing craft beer. Tough job, but someone has to do it. With all the laws and regulations surround the exploding industry of micro and craft brewing, it’s good to have a trio of  attorneys dedicated to knowing exactly those rules are and how to get around them, er, comply with them. And what better place to set up shop than in Beer City USA (at least in 2012), the hub of the craft beer movement, Asheville, N.C. which seems to have a new brewery pop up every couple of weeks. There is a very interesting discussion about the art and creative side of brewing heady beer, versus business side of well, having a business and making money. That’s where the lawyers come in, obviously.Scouts Allow Gays, Sort Of…We don’t usually delve into social issues, but this is a biggie, so it gets a mention. The Boy Scouts of America, and the recent lightning-rod issue of homosexuality in the ranks, took a step toward progression last week then they declared they would allow openly gay scouts into the ranks. The decision was made by secret ballot by 1,400 volunteer leaders from 270 councils and passed with 60 percent of the vote. The decision only applied to scouts, however, and scout leaders will still have to be as straight as a merit badge sash. This seems like a compromise of sorts and Conservative groups had a hissy fit. John Stemberger, head of the Florida Family Policy Council is quoted as saying, “Allowing openly gay scouts will mean the blunt injection of hypersexuality and gay activism into a youth organization.” Hypersexuality? As oppose to all the not-gay, teenage scouts who do such a great job keeping their hormones in check?last_img read more

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Cherokee, N.C

first_imgPopulation: 27,218Public lands: Great Smoky Mountains Natinal Park, Nantahala National ForestOutdoor Highlights: Nantahala River, Fontana Lake, Clingman’s Dome, Appalachian Traillast_img

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The September Issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors is On Stands Now!

first_imgFall is upon us and we couldn’t be happier to announce the release of our September issue of Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine. To keep it simple, let’s call it the Biking Issue, although it’s so much more than that.As usual, you’ll be enveloped by our contributors musings on everything from conservation to the local music scene, from outdoor news to essays on how to find a job you love.We’ve got an exclusive interview with one of the most famed professional cyclists in the world, who just happens to make his home down in Greenville, South Carolina. We’ll take you climbing in Kentucky’s Red River Gorge. And we take a spin around the region with ten cyclists who just might change your opinion on why you ride bikes.We hope you can pick up your free copy of this issue on a newsstand near you. If you can’t, we’re on iTunes, we’ve got complete digital subscriptions available, print subscriptions, and of course, you’ll always find us online here at BlueRidgeOutdoors.com.See you out there!featuresWHY I RIDE Ten bikers—from elite pros to everyday commuters—share the secrets of their two-wheeled passion.PARADISE SAVED The Red River Gorge is a climbing oasis, with thousands of routes and visitors. What makes this quiet river’s sandstone cliffs so legendary? AND Saving the Red’s Muir ValleyKING GEORGE RETURNS Tour cyclist George Hincapie comes home to South Carolina to start a hotel and ride his beloved Blue Ridge.departmentsEDITOR’S NOTE Is wilderness dead?QUICK HITS Apple’s third solar farm in Carolina / Follow the A.T. bricks / Tube to work / New Hardrock recordTHE DIRT Paddling prodigy plunges down waterfalls / Bald Guy’s beans and bikes / Dirtbag climbing entrepreneurs / How to land an outdoor industry jobTHE GOODS Peek inside elite mountain biker Sue Haywood’s packTRAIL MIX Trampled by Turtles tour the Blue Ridgelast_img read more

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Trail Mix | The Cactus Blossoms

first_imgOh, the brother band.Ralph and Carter. Jim and Jesse. Noel and Liam. Chris and Rich.In so many cases, brothers as singing partners and band mates can work out so well. Witness above the Stanleys and McReynolds, two pairs of brothers who count among bluegrass music’s luminaries. Theirs were extraordinary partnerships.Also witness the Gallaghers and Robinsons, of contemporary rock fame. Their collaborations were equally brilliant and fractious and, ultimately, spelled for the demise of their respective bands.Continuing in the vein of country brother duos come Page Burkum and Jack Torrey, brothers who seem more akin to the Stanleys than the Gallaghers. Together, the two form the core of The Cactus Blossoms. This Minnesota based vintage country outfit takes inspiration from those old, raspy 78s and 45s, bearing names you didn’t recognize, that you might have, once upon a time, found squirreled away in your grandparent’s closet.Jack and Page fell in love with the guys who taught Hank Williams, Jimmie Rodgers, and the earliest heroes of The Grand Ole Opry what country music sounded like.The brothers recently celebrated the release of their latest record, You’re Dreaming,  which was produced by J.D. McPherson.I recently caught up with Jack and Page to chat about rhyming dictionaries, old country singers, and dreaming.BRO – Minnesota is a long way from cactus country. How did you come to fall in love with classic country?JT – The little plains prickly pear is the only cactus you’ll find in Minnesota, and they’re out west where the bedrock starts peaking out of the prairie. Our band name was never intended to be literal or geographic, though. I fell in love with some of the early country stuff the hardest, probably, when I got my first real dose of heartache. Somehow, it unlocked the space between the lines on certain songs I was hearing and I could relate to the singer in a way I never had before.PB – Minneapolis may be a long way from Nashville, but remember that Hank Snow was from Nova Scotia and Merle Haggard was born in California. There’s always been country music lovers up here. There was a club called The Flame Cafe running in Minneapolis in the 1960s that all of the country stars of the time played. I’ve heard Dave Dudley had a regular gig there for a while, and I’m guessing it was before he had a hit with “Six Days On The Road.”BRO – Can you name an obscure country artist or two that our readers should get to know?JT – Wade Ray is an obscure artist whose work falls somewhere between vaudeville and 60’s country. He was a prodigy fiddler, a great singer, and he worked with all sorts of people in his later years. He’s even playing bass with Willie Nelson’s band on the album Live At Panther Hall. And does Bob Dylan count as an obscure country artist? Nashville Skyline is one of my favorite country albums of all time.PB – Rex Griffin. He never became famous, but he was a huge influence on many, including Hank Williams and Ernest Tubb. Hank Williams definitely learned “Love Sick Blues” from his version. He wrote the ultimate sad country song in “The Last Letter” – about a suicide note – but he also wrote “Everybody Wants To Be My Baby,” which was later covered by both Carl Perkins and The Beatles.BRO – What’s the best part about playing music in a band with your brother?JT – We’ve had a lot of experience working together on different projects throughout our lives and I think it transfers well to playing music and traveling. Even though we are really different, we understand each other and speak the same language.BRO – We are featuring “Clown Collector” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song?JT – “Clown Collector” was one of those songs that I never thought I’d write. Who wants to rhyme with “collector” that many times! I didn’t use a rhyming dictionary or anything, but that probably would have been smart. Something about it seems like cheating. When it popped into my head, I could almost hear Chuck Berry singing it, or maybe Woody Guthrie, if he ever got rock ‘n roll with one of his lighter hearted tunes.BRO – In keeping with the title of the new record, are you an avid dreamer? Care to share what  you remember about a recent dream?JT – I’ve had some dreams that were pretty significant in my life that I think have altered my perception of the world, but you never know when one will pay you a visit. I had a dream within a dream a while back. I don’t remember what it was about, but there’s something about waking up twice that is pretty bizarre feeling. The bulk of my dreams are on par with a Labrador Retriever, and I’m probably just running through a field somewhere.Jack and Page will be celebrating the release of You’re Dreaming with shows in St. Paul, Minnesota, in early February. The rest of the month has The Cactus Blossoms playing across the Midwest and Northeast.For more information on the band or how you can grab a copy of the new record, check out the band’s website.[divider]More from Trail Mix[/divider]last_img read more

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Trail Mix | Tommy Womack

first_imgPlaying with house money.I am sometimes bandy that about when chatting with (or about) people who have had near brushes with death. Folks and friends who, just maybe, missed that trip through the long black veil by sheer luck, happenstance, or divine intervention.We all know someone like that.Tommy Womack sure fits the bill. Having once defied the odds by kicking addiction in 2012, Womack was involved in a horrifying car crash in June of last year when his Nissan Sentra was t-boned by a tractor trailer truck while on tour in Kentucky.By all accounts, Womack shouldn’t be here. But he battled back (again) and – thankfully – the stark and witty songwriting that has won him a loyal and fervent fan base continues on his new record, Namaste.Tommy Womack recently took the time to chat with me about the new record, giving thanks, and good coffee.namasteBRO – Considering the year you have had, the power of your album cover is not lost on me. For what are you giving thanks each day?TW – I’m giving thanks for a lot, but here’s one specific thing. I’ve driven thousands of miles in every state of mind imaginable. Never wrecked. I’ve been sober for four years. So if I had to have a wreck, I’m thankful it happened NOW, when there wasn’t a joint in the ashtray and no half-empty bottle rolling around on the floorboard.BRO – In truth, I had no idea what “namaste” meant when I got your record. I had to look it up. Knowing what it means now, it seems like we could all use an extra dose of that spirit.TW – The whole world needs a dose of that spirit. I’m religious but I’m not religious about it. I do believe in spirit, and I believe in people.BRO – How did songwriting help in your recovery?TW – Well, you know, I don’t know if it did specifically. It’s just something I do now and then and when I’ve done enough, I go into the studio and make a record. I try not to question why I do it anymore, or how. Probably, buying a good new La-Z Boy helped my recovery as much as anything.BRO –  I really enjoy your Monday Morning Cup of Coffee feature, which I follow on Youtube. What makes for your favorite cup of coffee?TW – Coffee’s like the last best drug. I actually go to bed feeling excited about waking up and having that first cup. The brain jump-starts and it’s a new day. Everything is fresh. That’s the best cup.BRO – We are featuring “End Of The Line” on this month’s Trail Mix. If I may speak for fans of yours everywhere, we sure hope Namaste isn’t yours.TW – Thank you. Every record I make, I promise myself it’s the last one. No more of this foolishness. But it never sticks. John Prine says if you think breaking into show business is hard, try breaking out! And, as Billy Joe Shaver says, there’s nobody quit to.Tommy Womack heads back to the stage in early August with shows in Nashville and Chattanooga. For more information on Tommy Womack, the new record, or when he will be coming to a stage near you, check out his website. And, for you fans of coffee and witticism out there, make sure you follow Tommy’s Monday Morning Cup of Coffee.Also, be sure to check out “End Of The Line” on this month’s Trail Mix.Photo by Stacie Huckeba.More from the Trail Mix blog:last_img read more

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Gear on the Go: April 2018 | Live Outside And Play

first_imgAfter a rushed two weeks of frantically making our metal box a livable home, we’re off on our way! Round two? Bring it on. The van is loaded down with gear, but we already have our favorites. Below is the first installment of our “Gear on the Go” where we feature our favorite pieces of gear throughout the tour. Keep an eye out every month for our picks! If something piques your interest, find us at a festival and check it out in person.NiteIze Steelie Windshield Kit+NiteIze has designed a magnetic phone management system Einstein would be proud of. The NiteIze Steelie Windshield Kit+ is one part of many different pieces of gear designed to make your life easier and safer. With the magnetic doughnut stuck to the back of your phone, a world where you don’t lose your phone between your car seats opens up. We do plenty of driving, and this windshield kit is something we rely on heavily while navigating from adventure to adventure. It allows the driver to focus and navigate themselves, leaving the passenger free to write blog posts and practice knots (although the rest of NiteIze Gear is designed so you don’t have to know any knots at all!)One part of the system suctions to the windshield (really suctions, no need to worry about this falling off), and the arm adjusts to place the phone in the best possible angle. At the end of the arm is a magnetic sphere for your phone to perch on. Between some well-placed rubber, and the strong magnets, the phone stays securely on its stand, ready to navigate you to hikes, crags and pizza. One of the nicest parts of this system is your phone isn’t directly in front of an air vent. In the summer, your phone ends up blocking the AC, and then in the winter it overheats. This system keeps it away from any airflow, landing your phone in a safe place. Bonus, it’s easy to charge your mobile device from its position on the windshield mount, making sure you have enough juice for some selfies at the summit.UCO Gear Vapor+ HeadlampIf you have made the same mistake we have and thought that all headlamps are created equally, please let us tell you all the ways that just isn’t true. The UCO Gear Vapor+ Headlamp is a step above the rest. We have ours in an extremely accessible shelf in the van, ready to grab at any second. The head strap is made of neoprene with a Precision Fit system, which makes sure the elastic never wears out or squeezes your head too tight. The velcro makes it easy to readjust when you’re switching between a bandana and a winter hat. You can power the headlamp with either regular triple A’s or a rechargeable lithium battery. Multiple options mean you don’t have to worry about being without light under the stars. Foul weather? Don’t worry, this headlamp is water resistant, it will brave the elements with you. Our favorite feature is the Infinity Dial adjustment, which allows you to zero in on the exact amount of light you want to emit. This is necessary for the perfect nighttime photography shot or moving around the van at night without waking up sleeping habitats. You can also spin this headlamp all the way and get 300+ lumens in front of you, enough to keep working throughout the night!HydraPak Seeker 3LThere are so many problems that need solving when you live in a van. How do we keep recycling together? What do we charge and when? Is this sock dirty, or can I wear it a few more times? Luckily, we have no questions concerning water storage. Using the HydraPak Seeker is intuitive in a van. Even its shape is conducive to space saving. It has tabs to hang it, measurements on the outside and know exactly how much we have left, and rolls down into its own bag when we finish it. It is easy to clean, being dishwasher safe, but also conducive to hot water and suds when a dishwasher is far, far away. It’s ultra durable and made with abrasion resistant TPU & RF welded seams. This design improves flexibility as well. You can attach a filter to the mouth and use it as a base camp water source. It can withstand a large range of water temperatures, so you can freeze water inside, or pour water up to 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Soup for the whole festival? All of these reasons we love it for #vanlife make it perfect for camping, hiking and backcountry adventures, too!Wenzel Tent Shennanigan 5Having shelter you can put up quickly saves more time for adventuring, partying and relaxing. This five-person tent is perfect for your next festival weekend, car camping gathering or play pretend afternoon. It uses a one pole system, so once you hammer down the stakes around the corners, you javelin into the empty tent with the single pole and now you have a living area. It has multiple vents so when the festival gets hot, your tent will stay breezy. There are organizational pockets on the sides to keep your phone separate from your blanket fort. With roll-up windows, you have the chance to let the sunlight in, or make friends with your tent neighbors. The best part of this tent is being able to put on your festival outfits without crouching on the ground. The 90-inch center height turns your tent into a professional dressing room. This simple design is perfect for a weekend away, be it to listen to tunes, or enjoy the sounds of nature.There is one way for this tour to be a reality, our sponsors! Sending a thank you shout out to our title sponsor Nite Ize, and all of our other awesome sponsors like Crazy Creek, National Geographic, Sea to Summit, Mountain House, Lowe Alpine, Old Town, Leki, HydraPak, UCO Gear and Wenzel.last_img read more

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