Suspended police officer shot and killed in Jamaica

first_imgA suspended police officer was shot and killed in Jamaica on Tuesday in a hotel parking lot where he worked as a security guard.Police said that Constable Deron Henry, who had been on suspension from the police force, was killed early Tuesday in Kingston.Police have given no motive for the killing, but media reports said that management saw a car parked on the premises and alerted Henry who reportedly went to make a check. He was fired on by armed men who were inside the vehicle. He later died at hospital of his wounds.Meanwhile, the law enforcement authorities are investigating reports that three people, including a six-month-old baby were shot in St Andrew.So far this year, more than 470 people have been murdered across the islandlast_img read more

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Lawrence Norris, 98, Wellington: June 3, 1915 – Sept. 3, 2013

first_imgLawrence NorrisLawrence A. Norris, lifelong Wellington resident and retired farmer, died Tuesday, September 3, 2013 at Golden Living Center in Wellington at the age of 98.Lawrence was born the son of William and Martha Belinda (Osburn) Norris on Thursday, June 3, 1915 in Portland.On July 17, 1933, he and Ethney Jane Adams were united in marriage in Wichita. They were married over 61 years prior to her passing on November 26, 1994. Lawrence was blessed to find love again and on August 5, 2000, he and Carol (Rusk) Hunt were married in Wellington. Together they celebrated 13 years of marriage.   Survivors include his wife, Carol Norris of Wellington, son, Larry Norris and his wife Marla of Kansas City, Missouri, son, Thomas Norris and his wife Helen of Wellington, step-children: Vicki Eggers and her husband Ed of Genoa, Illinois, Kevin Lee Hunt and his wife Mary of Wellington, Dianna Starburg and her husband Ben of McPherson, grandchildren: Matthew Norris and his wife Cherie of Bates City, Missouri, Michelle Norris of Kansas City, Missouri, Marty Sue Karguth and her husband Don of Edmond, Oklahoma, Eric Norris and his wife Jennifer of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, Lisa Herndon and her husband Kelsey of Edmond, Oklahoma, Ross Eggers of Genoa, Illinois, Hillary Lynn Eggers of Chicago, Illinois, Emily Frances Eggers of Colorado State University, Nathan Hunt of Wellington, Kaleb Hunt of Wellington, Jaden Lee Starburg of McPherson and Kilynn Jenae Starburg of McPherson along with his great-grandchildren: Kelly Sue Karguth, Nathan Karguth, Thomas Earl Norris, Ezra Herndon, Kaylen Herndon, Weston Herndon.He was preceded in death by his first wife, Ethney Norris, parents, William and Martha Norris, sisters: Alice Pearl Hendricks, Beulah Frances Roberts and brothers: Willard Earl Norris, Leonard John Norris and Ellis William Norris.Visitation will be held at the funeral home from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m., Friday, September 6, 2013 with the family present from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.Funeral services for Lawrence will be at 10:00 a.m., Saturday, September 7, 2013 in the Church of Christ, WellingtonInterment will follow at the Forest Hill Cemetery near Portland.Memorials have been established in his loving memory with the Church of Christ, 217 West 13th Street, Wellington 67152 or the Silver Maple Camp (c/o Phil Watson), 9 Stadium, Haven 67543an be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

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Ex-players join Rams as part of Minority Coaching Fellowship program

first_imgIn this June 6, 2014 file photo, St. Louis Rams head coach Jeff Fisher watches during an organized team activity at the NFL football team’s practice facility in St. Louis. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson, File)ST. LOUIS (AP) — Four former NFL players have joined the Rams coaching staff this summer as part of the Bill Walsh Minority Coaching Fellowship program.The participants include former Titans running back John Simon, who coaches at Southern Miss; former Titans defensive tackle Tony Brown, who is an assistant at Tennessee-Chattanooga; former Colts, Falcons and Jaguars linebacker Mike Peterson, an assistant at his alma mater, Florida; and former Bills, Redskins and Saints safety Pierson Prioleau, who coaches at Radford High School in Virginia.The program’s objective is to use NFL training camps, offseason workout programs and minicamps to give minority coaches opportunities to observe, participate and gain experience and ultimately get a full-time NFL coaching position.Three current NFL head coaches — Tampa Bay’s Lovie Smith, Pittsburgh’s Mike Tomlin and Cincinnati’s Marvin Lewis — are former participants.The program is named after the former 49ers coach who conceived the idea and helped the NFL put it in place in the late 1980s.___Online:AP NFL website: www.pro32.ap.org and www.twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

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One Man Show Entertains and Empowers Olympia Audiences

first_imgFacebook515Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Rebekah Finn for Harlequin ProductionsHave you ever seen one actor give voice to over 35 distinct characters in the span of just 90 short minutes? This month at Harlequin Productions, you have the opportunity to experience just that in the one man show I Am My Own Wife by Doug Wright, starring Seattle theater artist Corey D. McDaniel.“This is original storytelling,” McDaniel points out. “The only difference between this and a campfire 500 years ago is that we’ve got some fancy lights and some set pieces. This is storytelling in its purest form.”Photo courtesy: Harlequin ProductionsWhen he sat down with us to talk about the show, he was in the midst of working hard to figure out how to portray all 36 different characters with utmost clarity. “In early rehearsals, we were getting confused. Sometimes it’s like, ‘who said that?!’ Our goal in rehearsing is to clarify when each character is newly present and then gone.”“It is a lot of fun for the audience to watch one actor have a conversation with three people,” adds director Aaron Lamb.As well as being humorous and entertaining, I Am My Own Wife touches on some broad themes that are relevant to any human being, no matter their time in history. The central character, Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, was a transgender person who lived through both the Nazi and Communist occupations in Berlin. As a gay man, von Mahlsdorf would have been targeted by Nazis during the Holocaust. In 1968, homosexuality was officially decriminalized in East Berlin, but the environment did not immediately improve. Attempts to create a public LGBT community were often thwarted by the G.D.R. government and the SED party. The play is a portrayal of von Mahlsdorf’s survival and perseverance through those oppressive societies.In the early 1990s, playwright Doug Wright became enthralled with Charlotte von Mahlsdorf (Lothar Berfelde) who was a collector and museum curator in the eastern Berlin district of Mahlsdorf.“He was tipped off to her existence by a friend of his who lived in Germany. So he went over and toured her museum and met her, and he was enchanted enough that he wanted to continue researching her and getting to know her,” explains Lamb.“So he spent a couple of years visiting her and spending time in Germany, and the result is a somewhat difficult to curate piece of theater, for reasons that will be explained in the play.” Their acquaintance and the stories she told him about her life became the basis of Wright’s play, which went on to win numerous awards in 2004, including the Pulitzer Prize for drama.As he began researching the role, McDaniel started seeing the parallels between the historical context and today’s social environment: “I was amazed at how little I actually knew about the transition from Nazi Germany to Communist Germany. The parallels of what was being said by the politicians in power are very, very relevant right now. It’s frightening how relevant it is and how quickly one of the most advanced civilizations on the planet became one of the most repressed and destructive civilizations on the planet. And also, it’s a powerful experience to understand more deeply why my life is as blessed as it is today, because of the freedoms that were not allowed not that long ago.”Photo courtesy: Harlequin ProductionsBecause of the play’s relevance to LGBTQA+ conversations, the production has attracted the attention of two major funders who are sponsoring the show. Firstly, the show is supported, in part, by a grant from ArtsWA (The Washington State Arts Commission). Part of ArtsWA’s values state that the arts are a catalyst for inclusiveness, social equity, and racial justice. The other major funder, The Sheri and Les Biller Family Foundation, expresses similar values at billerfamilyfoundation.org: “We endeavor to support artistic content that promotes important conversations around timely social issues.”A major component of the grant agreement with The Sheri and Les Biller Family Foundation is a community forum, featuring a panel of community speakers related to some of the themes of the play. This discussion will be held on February 4 at 5:00 p.m., and will be open to audience members from any of the I Am My Own Wife performances.Part of the beauty of this play, and what it contributes to conversations about transgender individuals, is how it portrays Charlotte von Mahlsdorf as a regular human being at the end of the day, just like the rest of us.“Even if as individuals, the audience may not think they feel a kinship with this character, they will,” reflects Lamb. “You can’t help but feel that kinship; she’s so human.”McDaniel agrees: “Her story is actually about so many other things than her being a transvestite. That’s such a small percentage of what she was about. She’s about all of these incredible pieces of furniture and history and music and all of these things that saved her soul because of who she was, living in such a repressive environment.”If any of you, like me, have looked at recent news headlines and felt an overpowering need for a prescription strength dose of hope and optimism, then this 90-minute play may be just what the doctor ordered. I’ll let director Aaron Lamb have the final word on why Charlotte von Mahlsdorf’s story is so important to share with the community:“As a collector, she’s collecting pieces of the past of a society that’s really difficult for her. She just sees beauty in the world, and she keeps it. That’s her way of coping with understanding the world around her. She’s just such a positive force. It’s amazing to see somebody that positive.”To see this beautiful story of an amazing human soul, plus have access to the community forum, buy your tickets online now at harlequinproductions.org, or contact the box office for more information: 360-786-0151.last_img read more

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Beebe picks up fourth win, B52s down Hawks

first_imgCole Harper and Jeff Giacomini each hit a home run as the Humboldt B52s evened up its weekend 3-game series against the visiting Ukiah Hawks with an 11-7 win, Saturday evening at Bomber Field.After falling into a 1-0 hole after one inning the B52s seized the lead in the second inning, a lead which it would hold on to for the remainder of the contest.Karter Koch led the bottom of the second with a single and Matt Mascio worked his way to a walk to put two men on with no outs. Cole Harper …last_img read more

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Alabama’s Bo Scarbrough, Who Had Knee Surgery 2 Days Ago, Posts Video Of Leg Lift

first_imgAlabama Bo ScarbroughAlabama Bo ScarbroughThis past Friday, Alabama freshman running back Bo Scarbrough, a five-star recruit from Tuscaloosa, tore the ACL in his right knee during a team scrimmage. Monday, he underwent surgery to repair the injury. Wednesday, he’s already starting rehab, completing straight leg lifts. Really.Scarbrough, who is clearly excited about how his recovery is going, posted a 30-second Twitter video of himself extending and lifting his right leg in a doctor’s office. It’s impressive, given the quick turnaround.Two day out of surgery and already can do a straight leg lift! It’s a blessing to be able to come back and work hard! pic.twitter.com/8NQ31ZDsjR— Bo Scarbrough (@starbo06) April 8, 2015Scarbrough was a huge get for the Tide, and has a bright future ahead. Let’s hope he’s back on the field as soon as possible.last_img read more

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Tennessee Wideout Marquez North Suffers Knee Sprain

first_imgMarquez North of Tennessee Injured.Marquez North Tennessee Injury RumorYou can exhale, Tennessee fans. Junior wide receiver Marquez North is not sidelined for the season, despite what rumors suggested Wednesday night. North, one of the team’s top playmakers, instead is only suffering from a knee sprain and will be out of action for around one week. Both Bruce Feldman of Fox Sports and Brett McMurphy of ESPN confirmed the news Thursday morning.SOURCE: Speculation on #Vols big WR Marquez North possibly being injured & lost for the season is all false. He may be out 1 wk or less— Bruce Feldman (@BruceFeldmanCFB) August 13, 2015Tennessee WR Marquez North’s knee injury appears to only be a sprain source told ESPN— Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) August 13, 2015North caught 68 balls for 816 yards and five touchdowns in 2014, but a shoulder injury sidelined him for most of the second half of the season. At 6-foot-4, 225 pounds, he has the potential to be a serious threat for the Volunteers.last_img read more

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Katy to perform in Mumbai on November 16

first_imgMumbai: Grammy-nominated singer Katy Perry is set to return to India, this time to headline the a music festival in her first-ever performance in Mumbai on November 16. “I am so happy to be returning to India and excited to headline my first-ever performance in Mumbai. I am looking forward to seeing and singing with all of my Indian KatyCats at the festival,” said Katy, who had married comedian-actor Russell Brand in Rajasthan in 2010. The couple later parted ways. Also Read – I have personal ambitions now: PriyankaSpeaking about her performance, one of the organisers said, “We are super excited that Katy Perry will be starring in our Music Festival in India. We decided to host this festival to share our passion for music with our community, which is at the heart of everything we do. With Katy on board, this is sure to be a one-of-a-kind experience.” Devraj Sanyal, Managing Director and CEO, Universal Music Group, India and South Asia, added: “Katy is a not only a massive global pop superstar with a big Indian fan base, but is someone who has been relevant for some time now, starting with ‘Teenage dream’ to ‘Prism’ and ‘Witness’, and now her newest singles ‘Never really over’ and ‘Small talk’. “Her songs have been legends for her Indian fans and they can’t wait to see her perform in Mumbai.” According to a source, singer Dua Lipa will also be performing at the event on November 16.last_img read more

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Ontario researchers testing origins of life theory in new planet simulator

first_imgA small group of Ontario researchers believe they may have solved the origins of life mystery.The results come from early experiments run in a planet simulator at McMaster University’s new Origins of Life Laboratory, which started running this summer.The simulator — the centrepiece of the facility — is testing a theory that suggests life on Earth began in warm little ponds after meteorites splashed into them about four billion years ago. The machine recreates those conditions to see whether cellular life can be created and then evolve.“This is a very big moment,” said Maikel Rheinstadter, a biophysics professor and the lead investigator in the new laboratory. “There’s nothing else like this machine in the world.”The warm little ponds theory was first put forth by Charles Darwin, expanded on in the 1990s by Carl Sagan, and further developed by David Deamer, a professor in bioengineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz.Evidence over the last few years points away from another theory that suggests the building blocks of life came about through vents in the Earth’s crust at the bottom of the ocean.Rheinstadter and two colleagues — Ralph Pudritz, a theoretical astrophysicist and Yingfu Li, a biochemist — are now putting that theory into action.“We are very interested in understanding how the first very basic cell formed on the early Earth four billion years ago,” Rheinstadter said. “Nobody knows, but I think that’s what we have: a very solid proposal that this is potentially the mechanism.”The lab’s work is in its early stages and the planet simulator’s recent results must be replicated, Rheinstadter said, but what researchers have seen so far is promising.The new planet simulator at the heart of their efforts is about the size of a microwave and can control temperature, humidity, pressure, atmosphere and radiation levels to mimic conditions on Earth at any point in its history. It can also create the conditions of any other planet.It took years to get the machine built — most companies said they simply couldn’t make it — but a company in Kitchener, Ont., was able to take on the project, Rheinstadter said.When the machine was operational, the researchers used it to mimic a summer season on early Earth — a volcanic environment that was very hot during the day and cool at night, with the odd day of rain and periodic flooding.Inside the simulator’s chamber were elements of the “primordial soup” that existed at the time, which includes inorganic salts, clays, lipid molecules and nucleotides at varying concentrations, Rheinstadter said.The researchers ran the machine for a few weeks through important wet-dry cycles, which drive biochemical reactions, with entire seasons being replicated in days. After a time, they began to see results.“The molecules started to form cell-like structures and they started to incorporate genetic material just by themselves,” Rheinstadter said. “It’s amazing.”The researchers say they have shown that they can create what are known as proto-cells, which aren’t considered alive because the scientists still have to demonstrate that the genetic material in the cells can replicate itself and create proteins. But the results are still significant, they said.The developments in the lab come after research from Pudritz and graduate student Ben K.D. Pearce last year calculated that meteorites bombarded the Earth and delivered the building blocks of life that then bonded together to become ribonucleic acid — the basis for the genetic code. It’s that very research that the McMaster team is now testing.“It’s very exciting times,” Pudritz said.It’s taken years to get the lab and its simulator up and running.In 2012, Rheinstadter along with Pudritz and Li applied to the Canada Foundation for Innovation, an independent non-profit, for funding for their research.The team’s proposal to search for the origins of life happened to come at the right time as shortly thereafter NASA began reporting a flurry of discoveries of exoplanets where conditions could exist to support life. Public interest on the subject surged and the team’s bid for funds to build their simulator was approved.The $1-million lab also received funding from the provincial government and McMaster, Rheinstadter said.“We’re really fortunate and we’re now about five years ahead of everyone else in the business,” he said.Other leaders in the field are now clambering to get involved with the lab, including luminaries from the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany, Harvard University and the University of California, Santa Cruz, Rheinstadter said.The lab and its simulator have also been lauded by Deamer, the California professor who has worked on the warm ponds theory.“It’s marvellous,” Deamer said. “They’ll be able to do experiments no one else can. They just need the governments to open up their coffers to help pay for more collaborations because laboratories around the world want in on this.”Deamer called the planet simulator “game changing” and said the cells it has created so far are significant.“These cells are not alive, but are evolutionary steps toward a living system of molecules,” he said. “It opens up a lot of experimental activities that were literally impossible before.”Note to readers: This is a corrected story. A previous version had an incorrect name for the Canada Foundation for Innovation.last_img read more

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Weekly Summary Corporate dividends name changes new listings

first_imgNEW YORK — Changes announced in corporate dividends Dec. 17-Dec. 21.INCREASED DIVIDENDSAT&T .51 from .50Abbott Laboratories .32 from .28Alamo Group .12 from .11Albany Intl .18 from .17Andersons Inc (The) .17 from .165Annaly Cap Mgmt .30 from .2217Balchem .47 from .42Boeing 2.055 from 1.71Cantel Medical .10 from .085Community Financial .125 from .10CubeSmart .32 from .30Eili Lilly .645 from .5625Ensign Group .0475 from .045Fifth Third Bancorp .22 from .18Guaranty Fed Bcshs Mo .13 from .12Heico Cl A .07 from .06Heico Corp .07 from .06Investar Holding .05 from .045Lamb Weston Holdings .20 from .19125Limoneira .075 from .0625MGM Growth Properties .4475 from .4375Morningstar .28 from .25Norwood Financial .24 from .22Pfizer .36 from .34Reliant Bancor .09 from .08ServisFirst Bancshares .15 from .11Utd Security Bancshares .11 from .10Washington Trust .47 from .43SPECIAL DIVIDENDSCherry Hill Mtge Inv .15JBG Smith Properties .10Sunstone Hotel Investors .54g- Canadian fundsOTHER CORPORATE NEWS AND LISTINGS:STOCK SPLITS THIS WEEKInvestors Real Est Tr 1 for 10 reverse splitACQUISITIONS AND MERGERSMINIMUM VALUE $300 MILLIONExpress Scripts Holding – Cigma Corp (54B)Mazor Robotics Ltd ADS – Medtronic plc (1.6B)Spectra Energy Partners LP – Enbridge Inc (3.3B)NEW STOCK LISTINGSNASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETSAptorum Group IncSTOCKS REMOVED FROM TRADINGNYSECitigroup Inc warrants 1/4/19LaSalle Hotel Properties 6.375pc pfd ILaSalle Hotel Properties 6.3pc pfd JNavios Maritime Midstream Part LPNASDAQ GLOBAL AND GLOBAL SELECT MARKETSWintrust Financial Corp warrantsCORPORATE NAME CHANGESAvista Healthcare Public Acquis to Organogenesis Hldg Cl A (and warrants)The Associated Presslast_img read more

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