Kiwis divided on legalising cannabis, but more are in favour, 1 NEWS poll reveals

first_imgYes – 46%No – 41%Don’t know – 12%*Percentages have been rounded and do not add to 100 per cent. Interviewing took place from October 15 to October 19, with 1006 eligible voters contacted either by landline or mobile phone. The maximum sampling error was ±3.1 per cent.https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/kiwis-divided-legalising-cannabis-but-more-in-favour-1-news-poll-revealsKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox. Twelve per cent were undecided. Those more likely to oppose the legalisation were Asian New Zealanders (55 per cent against) and National Party supporters (52 per cent against). National’s Simeon Brown said there was “a lot of evidence of the harm caused by marijuana, so it’s something we need to take very seriously”. Do you think the personal use of marijuana should be legalised?center_img Forty-six per cent of Kiwis were in favour of legalisation and 41 per cent were against. TVNZ One News 25 October 2018Family First Comment:  Game on! Once we get the facts out, NZ will say No to Big Marijuana. (and this poll makes a mockery of the crap Massey University ‘survey’) #BringItOn#PeopleBeforeProfits www.VoteNo.nzThe latest 1 NEWS Colmar Brunton poll showed Kiwis were slightly more in favour of legalisation than against, with nearly half wanting the drug to be legal. Associate Professor of Psychology Joe Boden said it was his view the law should be changed and that “the laws around cannabis are enforced in a discriminatory manner”.Those who were more likely to support legalisation included Green Party supporters (79 per cent for) and men aged 18-34 (63 per cent for). Chlöe Swarbrick from the Green Party said as long as there is a “respectful, robust discussion” about what regulations around cannabis would look like, “we will see an increase in support”.last_img read more

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Watch: Nelson Mandela addresses Davos in 1999

first_imgNelson Mandela speaking to delegates at the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos on 29 January 1999. Click image for a larger view. (Photo copyright World Economic Forum)• Sello HatangCEO and spokespersonNelson Mandela Centre of Memory+27 11 547 [email protected]• WEF Davos 2014: Keeping up with a fast-changing world • Zuma urges Team SA to sell South Africa at Davos • Watch: Nelson Mandela’s first television interview• Nelson Mandela – a timeline • Nelson Mandela: a life in photographsFifteen years ago, on 29 January 1999, Nelson Mandela addressed global luminaries gathered at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, for the last time. It was his final year as president, and South Africa had been free for only five years. Yet much of what he had to say still resonates in South Africa, and in the global economy.Mandela had spoken at Davos before, in 1992, two years before he became president. In 1999 he was able to look back on five years of democracy and reflect not only on the successes South Africa had achieved since the end of apartheid, but also its continued challenges. These lay not only at home, but also in a newly globalised world. Global economic integration had brought benefits, but also new risks of worldwide economic contagion.Jump to videoJump to transcript of Mandela’s speechAt 80 years old, Mandela looked strong, dressed in a cream-and-gold floral print Madiba shirt – and welcomed to the stage with a standing ovation from the audience. He was introduced by World Economic Forum founder Klaus Schwab, who described him as “an inspiration to all of us”.“I have had the opportunity of welcoming many heads of state in Davos,” Schwab said. “But when it comes to you, Mr President, it is a very special and a very cherished moment.”Reflecting on the approaching end of the 1990s, Schwab added: “Mr President, you are most likely the greatest statesman at the end of the century. Your achievements form a guiding light, which all of us should consider as we build the 21st century.”Watch the videoNelson Mandela’s address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, 29 January 1999. (Mandela’s speech begins at the seven-minute mark.)Read the transcriptEdited transcript of Nelson Mandela’s address to the World Economic Forum in Davos, 29 January 1999. Let me begin by thanking you most sincerely for affording me the privilege of addressing the World Economic Forum in Davos for the last time as president of South Africa.South Africa’s leadership has had a close and fruitful relationship with the forum over the past eight years. Such is our approach to the international business community that our new democracy never hesitated to accept your kind invitations to participate in this rigorous forum. I hope that by doing so we have been able to convey information about the challenges and the potential of our wonderful land.We have been lauded, politely listened to and pilloried for some of the things that others and I have said on various occasions here in Davos. Indeed, I have vivid memories of this process during my visit here in 1991! It has taught us much and reinforced our belief in dialogue and interaction with the international community.The success of the annual regional summits has confirmed us in this judgement. I would, therefore, like to use the occasion to invite you all to this year’s Southern Africa Economic Summit in Durban in June. While I will not be able personally to welcome and host you, I can assure you of South Africa’s warmest hospitality and of many opportunities to promote our mutual goals.However, if you should during your visit see an old man by the road carrying a placard saying, “No Job, No Money, New Wife, Big Family”, please spare a thought! [Audience laughter]‘The desire of good men and women everywhere’What has stood out in all our interactions with you is your profound goodwill toward South Africa. I doubt if you know how much this means to us. To ensure a better life for all our people is a complex and difficult task. Your support strengthens our efforts and inspires us.We know that this goodwill arises from the desire of good men and women everywhere that South Africa should succeed in reconciling our people, and that we should lay the scourge of racism to rest.This requires strong democratic institutions and a culture of compassion. None of this is possible without a strong economy.The challenges we face combine many of the great challenges that face our global society. We need social stability that is based on socioeconomic development. We must nurture tolerance, collective wisdom and democracy. Like all countries, we must provide real personal safety and security against criminality and abuse of human rights.Who benefits from globalisation?The fact that we face these global challenges at the precise moment that we have become free with the world’s support places special obligations on our new democracy.Some people argue that we should focus on our own immense problems and leave others to their own devices. That would be to turn our back on those that helped to liberate us, often at great costs to themselves. It would be contrary to our morality, which will not let us desert our friends.Who, in our interdependent world, can turn their back on people in other lands when press, radio and television bring us the graphic reality of abuse, death, genocide and senseless and destructive wars?Is globalisation only to benefit the powerful and the financiers, speculators, investors and traders? Does it offer nothing to men, women and children who are ravaged by the violence of poverty?To answer “yes” to these questions is to recreate the conditions for conflict and instability. However, if the answer is “no”, then we can begin to build a better life for all humanity.Reflections on five years of freedomSouth Africa knew from the outset that reconstruction and development would be even more difficult than the defeat of the apartheid system. I cannot report that we have succeeded in all our endeavours in South Africa. Yet a great deal has been achieved in the first five years of democracy, in the face of many difficulties.The statistics of our progress are readily available to those that want them, so I will only cite two facts:In 1994, 12-million people in our rural areas, some 30% of South Africans, lacked access to clean drinking water. Since then, 3-million have gained access to that absolutely basic amenity.In 1994, two thirds (63%) of South African households lacked electricity. Today the figure is reduced to one third (36%) of households without electricity.An audience such as yourselves will understand what these two examples indicate about our broad programme of socioeconomic improvement: the scale of the challenge we inherited; the progress we have made; how much more is still to be done.You will appreciate that such improvement, if it is to be sustained, requires enduring changes in our public service, a stable and living democracy, as well as a dynamic and sustainable economy.Partnerships to combat joblessness, crime and HIVBecause development brings great structural change that affects different interests in different ways, the achievement of our goals requires of us the capacity to mobilise a highly complex society in pursuit of broad national objectives. It means building a broad partnership of major social forces.Considering the condition of South African society a few short years ago, I believe that we have made great progress in this regard. What is deeply encouraging is the way in which civil society is becoming actively engaged in transforming our society, in particular to deal with the most difficult challenges we face.Our recent Jobs Summit brought business, labour and the development community together with government to work for job creation.Business actively assists in our critical battle against crime. The religious community has come together with political parties to give a lead with government in the moral regeneration that will help fight corruption and crime. Farmers and farmworkers are working with the police and army to combat rural criminality.Last year this World Economic Forum gave a global lead to the international business community in the fight against HIV/Aids. I am pleased to be able to report to you that late last year a national Partnership Against Aids was launched in South Africa, by Deputy President Thabo Mbeki, bringing together all sectors of our society, including the private sector, to combat this epidemic.Such partnerships of social forces give our society a resilience and stability that keep it on a steady course, whatever the vagaries of political mood. This environment allows government to take a longer view and consistently apply sound and sustainable economic policies.In the stormy seas of the world financial markets, our medium-sized ship has taken some storm damage but continues to sail under its own power.Economic integration of AfricaHowever, like all trading nations, our own growth depends critically on growth in the world economy. When we can least afford it, the current crisis has had a very real impact on our growth rate, as it has across the world. Though still positive, our growth rate is nearly 3% below our initial projections for this year. Stability in the world economy and, more important, a return to growth in Southeast Asia, Latin America and Africa are vital.Our own long-term structural development also depends on all of southern Africa and Africa achieving the same, and on our building economic ties and development cooperation among ourselves.We are making sure but steady progress overcoming the colonial legacy of poor links, including transportation links, between our economies. Cross-border cooperation with our neighbours to promote investment and development grows by the month. We will make progress this year toward a Free Trade Agreement in the Southern African Development Community.But much as we have advanced in these and other ways, continuing conflicts are hampering development. The gains we are making could be jeopardised, not only in the countries directly involved but more generally, such is the interdependence of all our countries.African renaissance and the world economyAfrica is beyond bemoaning its past for its problems. The task of undoing that past is ours, with the support of those willing to join us in a continental renewal. We have a new generation of leaders who know that we must take responsibility for our own destiny, that we will uplift ourselves only by our own efforts in partnership with those who wish us well.In short, now that Africa is free, we can embark on the realisation of our long-held dream of the rebirth of our continent, of reconstruction and development.One of the greatest effects of this African renaissance will be the reintegration of the African economies into the world economy, no longer as dependent participants. One dimension to this reintegration is the unfolding of the complex processes that I have reflected on above. These processes will have to emanate in Africa.The other dimension raises a profound and fundamental question, as to whether the world economy in its current structure will allow this reintegration. This question is seldom asked, since it is the weaknesses in Africa and the developing world that are usually put under the spotlight. But it is an essential question.For Africa to reintegrate, its economies must industrialise and modernise, and their success in doing so will depend on the framework within which this occurs. When Southeast Asia and South Korea, and later some Latin American countries, successfully followed an export-oriented path to industrialisation, a new orthodoxy was established on industrialisation that relied on the globalised marketplace.For many, globalisation was no longer seen as a complex historical process but as an economic policy panacea.‘A grand and destructive irrationality’Today, however, we have seen how global financial turmoil can stall industrialisation – and even de-industrialise in some cases. Finance in abundance derived from very high levels of development is destabilising industrialisation processes where they are needed most.Profitable as this may be for individual market actors, it is a grand and destructive irrationality for those countries and their peoples whom it sets back on the development path.And it introduces instability in the global system whose effects ultimately no economy can escape.This must be addressed.Trade protectionism in the NorthIt is, however, not the only obstacle to the development of the South. Despite liberalisation of trade, there remain areas of protectionism in the developed countries. In agriculture, for example, Europe seeks to protect its rural communities by capturing markets that are the true competitive advantage of the South.In the steel industry, to take another example, the North seeks to protect old industries that will never be able to compete with the modern resource-based production of the South. This restricts an obvious avenue to modern production in Africa.These matters must be addressed in the multilateral fora if we are to ensure that Africa is able, through its own efforts, to reintegrate into the world economy. They form part of those changes to the economic, social and political world order which are needed if we are realise our dreams of a better world for all humanity. They are a part of what is necessary if the next century is to be, as it must be, the century in which Africa again takes her rightful place in the world.You will, therefore, understand why this old man, to whom you have granted the privilege of bidding you farewell in the twilight of his public life and at the turn of the century, has raised such very practical matters of unfinished business.‘My heart full of hope’It has been my great privilege to fight a struggle for freedom that the world adopted as its own, and which has been victorious in my lifetime. I have had the honour of representing a people who won the admiration and respect of all nations by reaching out to each other and finding common ground across a divide that seemed unbridgeable.In these last years I have experienced the complexities of governing a nation that seeks to overcome a legacy of social deprivation, and I am profoundly aware of how much is still to be done. I have witnessed the enormity of the task, still to be completed, of redirecting international institutions and systems in such a way that the prodigious capacity of the world economy shall satisfy the basic needs of all people.Knowing that I leave the governance of South Africa in strong and wise hands, and that there is a new generation of leaders in the world who have recognised the possibility of realising our dreams of a better world, I approach the end of my public life with my heart full of hope.I thank you for your attention, and wish you well in your efforts.last_img read more

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Infrastructures for Innovation

first_imgConverged voice and network services, increasing scalability and expanding application and information access are key components in creating infrastructures for innovation, according to a CIO2CIO report sponsored by Qwest Business.The report looks at research conducted by IDG on network and infrastructure investments and the ROI of infrastructure spending. IT + Project Management: A Love Affair klint finley Related Posts 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Tags:#enterprise#RWEnterpriseSponsored For more resources from Qwest Business, check out our Resource Center. Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

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Nets guard D’Angelo Russell replaces Victor Oladipo at NBA All-Star Game

first_imgMOST READ SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations LATEST STORIES Brooklyn Nets’ D’Angelo Russell, left, talks to coach Kenny Atkinson during the second half of the team’s NBA basketball game against the New York Knicks on Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York. The Nets won 109-99. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)Brooklyn Nets guard D’Angelo Russell was named Friday by NBA commissioner Adam Silver to replace injured Indiana Pacers guard Victor Oladipo in the 68th NBA All-Star Game.The elite showdown of NBA talent will be contested February 17 at Charlotte, North Carolina with LeBron James and Greek star Giannis Antetokounmpo serving as captains of the clubs.ADVERTISEMENT Oladipo was selected as a reserve by league coaches and under NBA rules, the commissioner selects a replacement from the same conference.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Bulls waive Carmelo Anthony, pave way for free agency Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Russell’s first NBA All-Star nod, the first by any Nets player since Joe Johnson in 2014, comes in his fourth league campaign with career high averages of 19.6 points and 6.4 assists as well as 3.8 rebounds and 1.17 steals over 52 games.He’s also hitting career highs of 43.8% from the floor, 37.4% from 3-point range and 80.8 percent from the free throw line.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesThe Nets went 11-4 in January to stand 28-25 and sixth in the Eastern Conference, 2.5 games ahead of Charlotte in the final playoff spot.Oladipo will miss the All-Star Game after suffering a ruptured quad tendon in his right knee against Toronto last week. PDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss View commentslast_img read more

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Report: Leganes 1 Sevilla 1

first_imgLeganes 1 Sevilla 1: Siovas strike keeps giant killers on course Stephen Creek 06:20 2/1/18 luismuriel-cropped Getty Images Having beaten Real Madrid in the last round, Leganes scraped a draw against Sevilla in their semi-final first leg of the Copa del Rey. Leganes kept their hopes of reaching the Copa del Rey final for the first time alive by coming from behind to draw 1-1 with Sevilla in the semi-final first leg at Butarque.Asier Garitano’s side, who sit 11th in La Liga, beat Real Madrid to reach the semi-finals but were slow to get going against Vincenzo Montella’s in-form Sevilla team.Luis Muriel put the visitors ahead with his seventh goal of the season but Leganes centre-back Dimitrios Siovas headed a fortuitous second-half equaliser to leave the tie in the balance. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player Sevilla’s Ever Banega fired a warning shot after 10 minutes, dragging the ball across the face of goal with a low right-footed shot.Final del partido en Butarque!! Leganés, 1 – Sevilla, 1 #LeganésSevillaFC #VamosLega #CopaDelRey SEGUIMOS LUCHANDO!! pic.twitter.com/8Opx1HLgNV— C.D. Leganés (@CDLeganes) January 31, 2018The deadlock was broken after 20 minutes when Pablo Sarabia’s angled pass sent Muriel into the box and he beat Nereo Champagne with a well-placed low shot into the far-left corner of the net.A defensive lapse allowed Claudio Beauvue a free shot at goal after 33 minutes but the Guadeloupean winger looped his shot over the crossbar from 20 yards.Joaquin Correa tried an audacious lob from 35 yards five minutes before the break but his shot flew just wide with Champagne stranded, and the Leganes goalkeeper made a one-handed save to deny Clement Lenglet moments later.The second half was 10 minutes old when Sevilla failed to clear their lines at a corner and the ball looped into the air before Siovas nodded home past Sergio Rico from close range.55′ | GOAL. Siovas equalises. @CDLeganes 1-1 #SevillaFC #vamosmisevilla #CopaDelRey pic.twitter.com/6qehyT84Bn— Sevilla FC (@SevillaFC_ENG) January 31, 2018Leganes threw men forward in the final quarter of the game to try and force a goal they know will be hard to come by at Ramon Sanchez Pizjuan in the return tie but Unai Bustinza headed Javier Eraso’s cross wide as their home advantage went to waste.last_img read more

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10 months agoKante: Chelsea matchwinner all about Luiz

first_imgKante: Chelsea matchwinner all about Luizby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea midfielder N’Golo Kante says his matchwinner at Crystal Palace came straight off the training pitch.Kante combined with David Luiz to fire home the only goal of the game in the 51st minute at Selhurst Park.He told Sky Sports: “It is a move I have tried in training.“It doesn’t work many times but David gave me a good ball and I am happy to score with my left foot and help the team win.”It was all about the pass.”Chelsea were made to work hard for all three points – and Luiz admitted it was a slog trying to break down the home side.“It is never easy to play here or control it here especially when they play long balls but we did well,” he said.“We could have scored early but they also did a great match defensively which is why it was so difficult.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Tennessee Wideout Marquez North Suffers Knee Sprain

first_imgMarquez North of Tennessee Injured.Marquez North Tennessee Injury RumorYou can exhale, Tennessee fans. Junior wide receiver Marquez North is not sidelined for the season, despite what rumors suggested Wednesday night. North, one of the team’s top playmakers, instead is only suffering from a knee sprain and will be out of action for around one week. Both Bruce Feldman of Fox Sports and Brett McMurphy of ESPN confirmed the news Thursday morning.SOURCE: Speculation on #Vols big WR Marquez North possibly being injured & lost for the season is all false. He may be out 1 wk or less— Bruce Feldman (@BruceFeldmanCFB) August 13, 2015Tennessee WR Marquez North’s knee injury appears to only be a sprain source told ESPN— Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) August 13, 2015North caught 68 balls for 816 yards and five touchdowns in 2014, but a shoulder injury sidelined him for most of the second half of the season. At 6-foot-4, 225 pounds, he has the potential to be a serious threat for the Volunteers.last_img read more

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Kelly Ellard killer of Reena Virk has day parole extended for six

first_imgThe Canadian Press VANCOUVER — The Parole Board of Canada has extended day parole for Kelly Ellard, who was convicted of second-degree murder in the killing of 14-year-old Reena Virk near Victoria in 1997.Ellard, who now goes by Kerry Marie Sim, received day parole in November 2017 and the board has extended it in six-month increments on several occasions.In the latest decision, dated Jan. 8, the board says the 36-year-old has continued to make “positive progress” in the community and has complied with her conditions.Ellard became pregnant in 2016 during a conjugal visit with her boyfriend and the board says her young child continues to be a “strong motivator” for her to improve her life.It also says she works part time in sales and marketing and staff at the halfway house where she lives say she has good relationships with workers and residents.But the board warns it’s concerned about her common-law spouse’s recent suspension while he was on parole, and says the relationship must be “carefully monitored” in future.Ellard was convicted in 2005 after three trials and received a life sentence.A court heard Ellard, then 15, and several other teens swarmed and beat Virk before Ellard and a teenage boy held her head underwater until she drowned.last_img read more

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Shoppers Drug Mart granted licence to sell medical marijuana online

first_imgTORONTO — Shoppers Drug Mart has been granted a licence to sell medical marijuana online.Health Canada’s list of authorized cannabis sellers and producers has been updated to reflect that the pharmacy can sell dried and fresh cannabis, as well as plants, seeds and oil.A website has been set up by the company, which says that patients “with a valid medical document will soon be able to purchase a wide selection of medical cannabis products” from Shoppers.The company was granted a medical marijuana producer licence in September, after initially applying in October 2016.Shoppers has said that it has no interest in producing medical cannabis, but the licence is required in order to sell the product to patients.Under the current Health Canada regulations for medical pot, the only legal distribution method is by mail order from licensed producers direct to patients.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

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Grains lower Livestock higher

first_imgCHICAGO — Grain futures were lower Friday in early trading on the Chicago Board of Trade.Wheat for Mar. delivery was lost 9.20 cents at $5.1340 a bushel; Mar. corn was fell 2 cents at $3.7240 a bushel; Dec. oats was off 12.20 cents at $2.74 a bushel; while Jan. soybeans declined 10 cents at 8.8520 a bushel.Beef and pork were higher on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange.Dec.live cattle rose .98 cent at $1.2050 a pound; Jan. feeder cattle was up 1.13 cents at $1.4738 a pound; Dec. lean hogs gained .67 cent at .6282 a pound.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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