There’s no place like home for Horned Frogs’ bounce-back

first_imgFacebook Boschini: ‘None of the talk matters because Jamie Dixon is staying’ Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Listen: The Podell and Pickell Show with L.J. Collier Garrett Podell Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ + posts Garrett is a Journalism and Sports Broadcasting double major. He is the Managing Editor for TCU360, and his passions are God, family, friends, sports, and great food. Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ ReddIt Men’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to Texas Previous articleHigh school hoops: Arlington Heights and Country Day lose, Paschal survivesNext articleFootball adds seven to round out 2019 class Garrett Podell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Linkedin Facebook TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks printAlex Robinson drives to the hoop against Baylor. Photo by Cristian ArgeutaSoto. Entering Wednesday’s game, Jamie Dixon’s club is coming off back-to-back road losses to No. 18 Texas Tech and Baylor, including the worst loss in Dixon’s tenure, a 26-point defeat to the Bears on Saturday.However, Wednesday provides TCU with an opportunity to halt its slide against Oklahoma State, the Big 12’s ninth-place team, with a chance to improve to 4-0 at home in Big 12 play.“Right now we look at them [OSU] as the best team in the league,” Dixon said. “We have prepare that way, think that way, and play that way. That’s our mentality. We have to be at our best to get back where we want to.” That attitude is justified since the Cowboys’ strength is from behind the arc. They shoot a Big 12-best 38.6 percent from the three-point line, an area where TCU slipped drastically after it led the conference in perimeter defense entering last week. Oklahoma State is powered by the Big 12’s best long-distance sniper, Lindy Waters III, who shoots 46.5 percent from three as well as Thomas Dziagwa who leads the conference in three-point field goals made per game, connecting on three per game. “They’re really talented. They’re dangerous,” point guard Alex Robinson said. “But we need to make sure that we handle our business and do what we’re supposed to do on the defensive end.”Last week, TCU allowed Texas Tech and Baylor to race ahead early by hitting a combined 13 first-half three’s and shoot a total of 24 of 49 from downtown.“We have a short memory,” Robinson said. “We know we’re coming back home and we’re undefeated at home. We need to focus on improving the things we need to improve on.” Overall, the team’s schedule sets up for them to make a push in the conference standings as six of their remaining 10 games will take place at Schollmaier Arena.“Our league is ups and downs,” Dixon said. “It’s who is healthy, who is playing well, who is playing on the road and who is at home. Everybody goes through a run, everybody goes through a slide.”Robinson poised to make historyRobinson, who tweaked his left wrist and right hand, is expected to be a full-go against Oklahoma State after going through medical evaluation, Dixon said Monday.Robinson said his injuries were “nothing big” and that he doesn’t anticipate missing any time. If that’s the case, then the senior point guard is set to make program-history in front of the Fort Worth faithful Wedesday as he sits four assists away from becoming the all-time assists leader in TCU history. Former Horned Frog point guard and current graduate coaching assistant Corey Santee holds the record with 575. Robinson is averaging 7.4 assists per game, the highest mark of any Big 12 player and the fourth highest rate in all of college basketball. “We have a really good chance to make a big run in the second half of the Big 12,” Robinson said. “We have a lot of home games. Our away games seem pretty manageable at this point.”Robinson has had fewer than four assists in just two of the Frogs’ 21 games.“Obviously a big part of our offense comes from his penetration and his dishing it out,” Dixon said. “There’s good stats to be excited about. You want guys to be hungry for rebounds and assists. We’re excited for him.”But Robinson said getting the win over Oklahoma State means more in the moment.“That’s the main focus,” he said. Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Twitter Twitter Boschini talks: construction, parking, tuition, enrollment, DEI, a student trustee ReddIt Alex Robinson drives to the hoop against Baylor. Photo by Cristian ArgeutaSoto. TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hellolast_img read more

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Guatemalan Army Engineer Soldiers On after Accident

first_imgSecond Lt. Girón’s disability does not prevent him from showing his daughter Briana affection either, as he carries and caresses her every time he is with her. Second Lieutenant Luis Gustavo Girón Salazar, with the Guatemalan Army Corps of Engineers, is moving forward in his career and personal life after losing his hands during a mission in which he saved the lives of a group of earthquake victims. Though 2nd Lt. Girón was quick to relearn how to dress himself, he still needs help with buttons. But his mother does not assist him any longer; that task is now done by his wife, Karla Hernández, who was his girlfriend at the time of the accident. However, the fence was electrified, and the current was so strong it launched him into the air. The blow 2nd Lt. Girón took to the head when he fell knocked him unconscious for six days before he woke up at the Military Medical Center, where he was also being treated for fourth-degree burns. The Army assists earthquake victims Zoila Salazar, 2nd Lt. Girón Salazar’s mother, recounted those days were filled with agony for her. “When I arrived, they told me that they would do everything they could to save his hands,” she recalled. “At work, he strives to perform the same activities he did before losing his hands, and he always asks that he be given no special treatment,” Colonel Luis Miguel Rada, the Corps of Engineers’ commanding officer, told Diálogo. “We have a flesh-and-blood hero.” Dealing with daily life Second Lt. Girón Salazar’s doctors delivered a grim prognosis. They said he would have brain damage and problems with his heart, liver, and lungs, and his kidneys could fail because the electrical shock had removed the water from his body. A second chance His selfless spirit shone through as he received many gifts from his visitors, including canned juice, cookies, toilet paper, and toothpaste. He knew that he would not use it all, so he put many of the items in bags and gave them to patients whose families lived far away and could not visit them often. Personnel from the Army Corps of Engineers responded the same day of the earthquake, and continued to work for more than a year rebuilding homes that had crumbled completely or were damaged in eight highly affected locations. Sometimes we waste our energy and time on things that aren’t important. When we’re perfectly healthy we complain; there is no doubt that a person’s greatest obstacle is their mind and their willingness, therefore we have to show gratitude to God every day Salazar worried how her son would react when he awoke from the surgery, but he was more concerned about his responsibilities than his loss. The first thing he did was look for his cellphone so he could continue to work, still unaware of what had happened. Today, 2nd Lt. Girón lives a life with no limitations – at work and home. He drives a stick-shift automobile, makes calls on his cellphone, and paints his house with the same skill he had before the accident. He did not focus on his loss. Instead, he felt joy in seeing his parents, who had separated years earlier, together at the hospital. During his hospital stay, 2nd Lt. Girón had plenty of visitors. “Sometimes they (doctors, nurses, and some of his visitors) joked that I should lend a few of my visitors to other patients whose family members could not make it to see them right away,” he said. center_img Sixty-four days after the accident, 2nd Lt. Girón left the hospital. When he arrived home, he pushed himself to find a better way to take care of himself after acknowledging his injuries had made him less independent. Within a few days he learn how to eat without the use of his hands, and later learned how to use his feet to use the remote for the TV before mastering the skill with his stumps. He is tenacious, optimistic, and full of energy – and is considered a hero and an inspiration by many of his colleagues, friends, and family members. Five months after the accident, 2nd Lt. Girón returned to work, where his first task was to deliver a lecture on the rebuilding efforts at the National Coordinator for Disaster Response (CONRED, for its Spanish acronym). He also received hook prosthetics, which help him perform many mechanical tasks, but he relies on his stumps for other activities, such as eating and writing. She agreed to allow doctors to amputate her son’s left hand. But during the procedure, the surgeons realized 2nd Lt. Girón Salazar’s right hand would also have to be amputated because it was burned so badly. “I asked God to give him a second chance because my son was practically dead,” Salazar said. “I clung to the hope that my son would live, even though I had doubts when I saw him so disfigured. I prayed and asked God to either make him healthy, or to take him as he was.” The earthquake caused major damage in the departments of San Marcos, Quetzaltenango, Sololá, Totonicapán, Retalhuleu, Quiché, Huehuetenango, and Suchitepéquez, according to the Guatemalan National Coordination Office for Disaster Reduction (Conred). The quake also destroyed schools and roadways. On January 14, 2014, 2nd Lt. Girón saw a fence was about to fall on residents whose homes had been damaged by an earthquake in the department of Quetzaltenango. He had been helping earthquake victims with the Guatemalan Army’s Corps of Engineers, and grabbed the fence before it struck the group. The Army engineer was injured while participating in a massive response by the Guatemalan Armed Forces two years after the November 7, 2012 earthquake that measured 7.4 on the Richter scale. The earthquake destroyed 1,860 homes and damaged 3,412 others. The Armed Forces have rebuilt 5,011 homes destroyed or damaged by the earthquake. Now, two years later, he is in charge of logistics for many of the Corps of Engineers’ activities. By Dialogo January 12, 2016 The accident “Out of the 24 hours in a day, I spent 10 on the phone coordinating with institutions and persons who needed help,” 2nd Lt. Girón said. A week after returning home, 2nd Lt. Girón drove his car. The next week, he drove it to his first doctor’s appointment with his mother as a passenger. last_img read more

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16 June 1976: the day Hector Pieterson died

first_img“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele. The police were ordered to shoot.”(Image: South African History Online)Brand South Africa reporterThese are the words of Sam Nzima, recalling the events of 16 June 1976, when over 500 people were killed as they protested over the imposition of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in township schools.Nzima’s photograph of the dying Hector Pieterson being carried by a fellow student was published around the world, and came to represent the anger and tragedy of a day that changed the course of South African history, sparking months of clashes between police, schoolchildren and protesters.Hector, 12, was one of the first casualties of what came to be known as the Soweto Uprising.Hastings: June 16’s forgotten heroFifteen-year-old Hastings Ndlovu was probably shot before Hector Pieterson, although he died later. But no photographer was on hand to record the moment.Another boy, Hastings Ndlovu, is believed to have been the first child to be shot on that fateful day. But Nzima, a photographer for Johannesburg newspaper The World, was on the spot when Mbuyisa Makhubo picked Hector up and, together with Hector’s sister Antoinette, ran towards a press car, into which he was bundled taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.“I was the only photographer there at the time”, Nzima says. “Other photographers came when they heard shots.”A few months after that, The World was banned and shut down.Hector Pieterson MuseumWhen you visit the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West, Soweto, you’ll see Nzima’s legendary photograph showing the unconscious Hector being carried by Makhubo, with Hector’s sister – now Antoinette Sithole – running alongside.You might also get to see Antoinette herself, who works at the museum, giving guided tours.But don’t expect to come away with an image of what Hector looked like – the family do not have a single snapshot of their famous son.Soon after 16 June, journalists approached the Pieterson family for pictures of Hector. Photographs were handed over with the promise they would be returned – but they weren’t. Thirty years later, the search for the photographs continues.The museum, which opened on 16 June 2002, follows the chronology of the build-up to 16 June 1976, starting with the way tensions were building among Soweto’s school children, with one school after another going out on strike.The museum stands two blocks from where Hector was shot and fell, on the corner of Moema and Vilakazi Streets in Orlando West, Soweto. There are houses on all four corners of that intersection, so the museum is located up the road in Kumalo Street.Hector’s mother, Dorothy Molefi, lives in nearby Meadowlands. “I’m very proud that there’s a museum for Hector, and that children are learning about him in history,” she says. “We still visit his grave every few months.”Hector’s father died not long before the opening of the museum.The museum is an impressive red-brick building, two storeys high, with irregularly shaped windows in a haphazard pattern. The community asked that the building blend in with the dwellings around it – small red-brick, semi-detached houses with iron roofs.Walking through the large rust-red door, the immediate impression is of a cathedral, with its double volume ceiling, tall thin windows, stripped wood floors, concrete columns and tall red-brick walls.The wall opposite the door is filled with an enlarged photograph of marching children, with banners and posters protesting the use of Afrikaans in township schools.The musuem’s chief curator, Ali Hlongwane, is sensitive to the differing accounts of why that day’s protests exploded the way they did.There is some debate about the extent to which several student organisations, in particular the South African Students Organisation and the South Africa Students Movement, were involved in the lead-up to the uprising. The role of the liberation movements – the African National Congress and the Pan Africanist Congress – is also unclear.“The re-representation of the story is an ongoing process”, says Hlongwane; the museum continues to record people’s stories and add to its displays.“We may get someone come into the museum, look at the photograph, and say: ‘This is me’, or ‘I know that face’. We will then record and archive their experiences”, Hlongwane explains.There seems no doubt about the role of various cultural activists in building solidarity among the youth, inspired by Black Consciousness philosophy. Writers, poets, dancers, singers and painters captured the injustice of apartheid, and some of these works are on display.Build-up to 16 JuneBut it is generally agreed that tensions in schools had been growing from February 1976, when two teachers at the Meadowlands Tswana School Board were dismissed for their refusal to teach in Afrikaans.Students and teachers throughout Soweto echoed this sentiment, and the African Teachers’ Association of South Africa presented a memorandum to this effect to the Education Department. From mid-May around a dozen schools went on strike, and several students refused to write mid-year exams.On 16 June, students from three schools – Belle Higher Primary, Phefeni Junior Secondary and Morris Isaacson High – planned to march from their schools to the Orlando Stadium, about a kilometre from the museum, to hold a meeting. But before they got to where the museum stands today the police met them, in Moema Street.There are conflicting accounts of who gave the first command to shoot, but soon children were turning and running in all directions, leaving some children lying wounded on the road – among them Hector Pieterson and Hastings Ndlovu.A major part of the museum’s presentation of the story of the day is done through TV monitors, recording the world’s footage of the events, as South Africa had only just got television. Text panels scattered throughout the museum give eye-witness accounts and background viewpoints.Inside the museumThe museum is arranged in a series of interleading spaces joined by ramps, moving you closer to Nzima’s photograph – enlarged and waiting for you at the top of the second ramp.The interior is dominated by red brick walls, with some areas plastered and painted white and black, and others left in grey concrete. Large square windows at the top of the ramps give views of the suburb’s significant sites: Orlando Stadium, the Orlando Police Station, Moema Street, and several schools. Combined with black steel banisters and high ceilings, the effect is stunning.One of the few walled-in rooms in the museum is the Death Register, the room that records the names of the children who died over the period from June 1976 to the end of 1977.But the day, and the events that followed, had positive consequences. Thousands of students joined the broader liberation movement, ensuring that resistance to apartheid was maintained and escalated. International solidarity movements added to pressure on the apartheid government.The use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction was dropped. More schools and a teacher training college were built in Soweto. Teachers were given in-service training, and encouraged to upgrade their qualifications by being given study grants.And most importantly, urban blacks were given permanent resident status in South Africa. Before, they had been considered “temporary sojourners” with permanent residence only in the designated homelands, often inferior pieces of land far away from industrial centres and jobs.Like the Apartheid Museum at Johannesburg’s Gold Reef City, this much smaller museum – the first museum in Soweto – has a simplicity which allows the drama of the story to have maximum impact.What became of them?What became of some of the chief protagonists of 16 June 1976?Sam NzimaNzima, who took six sequence shots of 12-year-old Pieterson in those brief moments, left Johannesburg for Limpopo – then the northern Transvaal – about a year later, when it became clear that his safety in the city was under threat. “The security branch phoned me and told me to go to John Vorster Square, but I went into hiding for three weeks,” he says.The harassment didn’t stop after he left the city. “In 1978 the security branch from Nelspruit phoned and told me that they knew of my whereabouts and what I had done.”Nzima set up a bottle store after he settled up north, and later served as a member of parliament in the homeland Gazankulu government. He opened a school of photography in Bushbuckridge after being donated a black and white enlarger by The Sowetan newspaper.“There is an art to developing black and white pictures”, he says.When the Independent Group bought Argus newspapers in 1999, he was given copyright to his Hector photographs.Theuns ‘Rooi Rus’ SwanepoelThe police commander who is believed to have given the command to fire on the schoolchildren on the day, Theuns “Rooi Rus” Swanepoel, was described by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in 1998 as a policeman “who already had a long history of human rights violations as chief interrogator of the security branch”.Swanepoel told the TRC: “I made my mark. I let it be known to the rioters I would not tolerate what was happening. I used appropriate force. In Soweto and Alexandra where I operated, that broke the back of the organisers.”Die Afrikaner, the far-rightwing Herstigte Nasionale Party mouthpiece, gives the following version of how the first shot was fired in Orlando West: “In the heat of the struggle, (Swanepoel) and his men are called in from leave to stop a mass of seething, threatening youths. The atmosphere is laden and then one of the blacks throws a bottle into the face of the Red Russian (“Rooi Rus”).“A war breaks out as the young men let loose on the seething crowds and the one responsible for throwing the bottle looks like chicken mesh after the automatic machine gun flattens him.”Swanepoel allegedly lost his right eye in the incident. He died of a heart attack in 1998 at the age of 71.Mbuyisa MakhuboMbuyisa Makhubo, the schoolboy who picked up Hector, was harassed by the police after the incident and eventually went into exile. His mother, Nombulelo Makhubo, told the TRC that she received a letter from him from Nigeria in 1978, but that she had not heard from him since. She died in 2004.Antoinette SitholeAntoinette Sithole, Hector’s older sister and one of five sisters, still lives in Soweto. She was 17 in June 1976.“On the day, I was hiding in the second house next to my school Phefeni High School,” Antoinette says. “There were younger children at the march who shouldn’t have been there. I don’t know why they were there – Hector was one of them. There were random shots, we were not familiar with teargas shots. I was confused, those first shots could have been teargas.“I came out of hiding and saw Hector, and I called him to me. He was looking around as I called his name, trying to see who was calling him. I waved at him, he saw me and came over to me. I asked him what he was doing here, we looked around, there was a shot, and I ran back to my hiding place. When I looked out I couldn’t see Hector, I waited, I was afraid, where was he?“Then I saw a group of boys struggling. This gentleman came from nowhere, lifted a body, and I saw the front part of the shoe which I recognised as Hector’s. This man started to run with the body, I ran alongside, and said to him: who are you, this is my brother?“A car stopped in front of us, a lady got out and said she was from the press, and offered us a lift to the clinic. We put him in the car. I don’t remember how I got to the clinic, but the doctor said Hector was dead so I gave his details.“I was so scared of how I was going to tell my mother. Two teachers from a nearby school took me to my grandmother’s house. A neighbour phoned my mother at work, and when she got home at 5.30pm my uncle was standing outside the house with me. She said she had heard on the radio that children had died. My uncle broke the news – she was calm, she showed no emotion.“My father lived in Alexandra – my parents are divorced – he saw the picture in the paper and recognised me and wondered why I wasn’t at school.“My mother’s strength – she was stronger than my father – helped me come to terms with death. I can accept now that we are all going to die.“My mother is still alive and still very strong. She still lives in the same house in Soweto. Hector was her only son, and since the uprising she has lost one of my younger sisters in a car accident.“To me and my family, Hector did not die in vain.”Source: City of JohannesburgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Its time we demanded the protection of our personal data

We are beginning to see the extent to which our online personal information can be compromised and used in ways we never intended and never authorized. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. EU’s tough new data protection rules When huge amounts of personal data meet powerful analytical technology, there is a staggering array of opportunities for the misuse of that data. We should be afraid. Our information can be used in ways that are detrimental to our reputation, potentially limiting to our careers and professional opportunities, and threatening to our livelihoods. We should all be worried about being tracked online and having extensive amounts of information collected and/or stored about us —about our lifestyle choices, our pasts, our interests, our religious or political beliefs and about our friends and their various likes, dislikes, beliefs and tastes. Our social media likes say a lot about our values, tastes and disposition. They are used to craft profiles about who we are and how we act, and, in turn, make us the target of marketing and manipulation aimed at influencing our actions and changing our minds. All of this represents a fundamental loss of our personal privacy and integrity.As these disturbing possibilities sink in, the need for greater protection against the unscrupulous becomes apparent. Know your rightsCanadians should familiarize themselves with the protections they do have and insist that more safeguards be put in place. Unlike individuals in the European Union, we do not have the so-called “right to be forgotten” —the right, basically, to silence details related to past events, and having information, videos or photographs expunged from internet records so that they cannot be accessed through a search engine.But Canadian law does allow us to withdraw consent for the use of our information, which obligates businesses to destroy our personal data. Under our Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), businesses must delete outdated and inaccurate data. But there are limitations to the law. The right to withdraw consent, for instance, applies only to businesses that collect personal information during commercial activities. Canadians —and consumers around the world —have the power to hold industries accountable for misuse or unauthorized use of our data. After the revelations about Facebook and Cambridge Analytica, Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, was challenged by Twitter users to delete the Facebook pages of his companies, which had more than five million followers combined. Musk promptly did just that. The gesture was a blow to Facebook’s reputation and likely to its bottom line.Make companies afraidCompanies should be afraid of losing users’ trust. We, the citizens of the digital world, should reconsider our relationship with these companies and demand better from them. We have the power.A new regulatory framework to protect Canadian citizens is needed to guard our personal information, not only related to what businesses have collected and not only within our national borders but abroad as well. Like the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, Canadians should be given the right to erasure or the right to be forgotten.It’s true that the right to be forgotten will compromise the right to freedom of speech and the right to know. But if it’s properly implemented, it can give individuals greater control over their personal data. That includes the right to erase data that is outdated or no longer valid, and the right to refuse the processing of our data. I was thrilled to hear that the Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien recognizes the need for an enhanced mechanism to protect Canadians online. While PIPEDA has enabled Canada to comply with the EU’s older data protection regulatory regimes, it may no longer provide the necessary level of protection. Yes, there is an urgent need for new policies, guidelines and tools to ensure adequate standards. And perhaps it is time for our policy-makers to enable a high level of protection for the personal data of Canadians everywhere in the world. The corrective measures and tools that are being built to protect EU citizens should be mirrored in the laws of our country. Explore further Provided by The Conversation There is no way of telling just how vulnerable and insecure our data is, or how and where it is being used. But it is high time we start worrying and high time we demand protection.When social media magnate Mark Zuckerberg, one of the world’s most powerful people, admits he’s been remiss at safeguarding our information on Facebook and vows to do better, we are justified in feeling that there is a very serious problem in the way our information is being used. When revelations emerged that data analytics firm Cambridge Analytica had allegedly harvested information on Facebook and then used it to sway voters and achieve political ends, we are justifiably suspect that there is a very serious breach of trust taking place in the shadows of the web. Cambridge Analytica stands accused of mining the personal information of 50 million Facebook users without authorization and using it to influence voters in the last U.S. presidential election.Company CEO Alexander Nix has been suspended after damning hidden camera interviews appear to reveal how data stored online can be used for nefarious purposes. Personal data used and abusedIn the wrong hands, our personal data can also be used to damage our reputations, discriminate against us and manipulate and exploit us. As the privacy commissioner of Canada considers policy reform to enhance the protection of our personal information, it is vital for us all to reflect on how that information could potentially be bought, sold, hacked or stolen, and used and abused in ways we never imagined. Citation: It’s time we demanded the protection of our personal data (2018, April 26) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-demanded-personal.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

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