Report: Draymond Green plans to appeal Warriors’ $120,000 fine for verbal altercation with Kevin Durant

first_imgGreen will ask the … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceDraymond Green plans to appeal the $120,000 fine levied by the Warriors after Green’s altercation with teammate Kevin Durant, ESPN reported Thursday.Green and Durant quarreled late in Monday night’s loss to the Clippers, an argument that sources said spilled over into the postgame locker room. Green subsequently was suspended one game without pay ($120,000 in his case) by the Warriors.last_img read more

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49ers sue Santa Clara to retain management of non-NFL events at Levi’s Stadium

first_imgSANTA CLARA — The San Francisco 49ers filed a lawsuit Friday to block Santa Clara’s attempt to end the team’s management of non-football events at Levi’s Stadium.The lawsuit comes in the wake of the City Council’s vote Tuesday to terminate the 49ers’ management agreement, effective Nov. 15. City officials contend the team misrepresented its experience in managing “public assembly facilities” and has violated city and state rules governing public contracts and prevailing wages. If the city …last_img read more

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16 June 1976: the day Hector Pieterson died

first_img“I saw a child fall down. Under a shower of bullets I rushed forward and went for the picture. It had been a peaceful march, the children were told to disperse, they started singing Nkosi Sikelele. The police were ordered to shoot.”(Image: South African History Online)Brand South Africa reporterThese are the words of Sam Nzima, recalling the events of 16 June 1976, when over 500 people were killed as they protested over the imposition of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction in township schools.Nzima’s photograph of the dying Hector Pieterson being carried by a fellow student was published around the world, and came to represent the anger and tragedy of a day that changed the course of South African history, sparking months of clashes between police, schoolchildren and protesters.Hector, 12, was one of the first casualties of what came to be known as the Soweto Uprising.Hastings: June 16’s forgotten heroFifteen-year-old Hastings Ndlovu was probably shot before Hector Pieterson, although he died later. But no photographer was on hand to record the moment.Another boy, Hastings Ndlovu, is believed to have been the first child to be shot on that fateful day. But Nzima, a photographer for Johannesburg newspaper The World, was on the spot when Mbuyisa Makhubo picked Hector up and, together with Hector’s sister Antoinette, ran towards a press car, into which he was bundled taken to a nearby clinic, where he was pronounced dead.“I was the only photographer there at the time”, Nzima says. “Other photographers came when they heard shots.”A few months after that, The World was banned and shut down.Hector Pieterson MuseumWhen you visit the Hector Pieterson Museum in Orlando West, Soweto, you’ll see Nzima’s legendary photograph showing the unconscious Hector being carried by Makhubo, with Hector’s sister – now Antoinette Sithole – running alongside.You might also get to see Antoinette herself, who works at the museum, giving guided tours.But don’t expect to come away with an image of what Hector looked like – the family do not have a single snapshot of their famous son.Soon after 16 June, journalists approached the Pieterson family for pictures of Hector. Photographs were handed over with the promise they would be returned – but they weren’t. Thirty years later, the search for the photographs continues.The museum, which opened on 16 June 2002, follows the chronology of the build-up to 16 June 1976, starting with the way tensions were building among Soweto’s school children, with one school after another going out on strike.The museum stands two blocks from where Hector was shot and fell, on the corner of Moema and Vilakazi Streets in Orlando West, Soweto. There are houses on all four corners of that intersection, so the museum is located up the road in Kumalo Street.Hector’s mother, Dorothy Molefi, lives in nearby Meadowlands. “I’m very proud that there’s a museum for Hector, and that children are learning about him in history,” she says. “We still visit his grave every few months.”Hector’s father died not long before the opening of the museum.The museum is an impressive red-brick building, two storeys high, with irregularly shaped windows in a haphazard pattern. The community asked that the building blend in with the dwellings around it – small red-brick, semi-detached houses with iron roofs.Walking through the large rust-red door, the immediate impression is of a cathedral, with its double volume ceiling, tall thin windows, stripped wood floors, concrete columns and tall red-brick walls.The wall opposite the door is filled with an enlarged photograph of marching children, with banners and posters protesting the use of Afrikaans in township schools.The musuem’s chief curator, Ali Hlongwane, is sensitive to the differing accounts of why that day’s protests exploded the way they did.There is some debate about the extent to which several student organisations, in particular the South African Students Organisation and the South Africa Students Movement, were involved in the lead-up to the uprising. The role of the liberation movements – the African National Congress and the Pan Africanist Congress – is also unclear.“The re-representation of the story is an ongoing process”, says Hlongwane; the museum continues to record people’s stories and add to its displays.“We may get someone come into the museum, look at the photograph, and say: ‘This is me’, or ‘I know that face’. We will then record and archive their experiences”, Hlongwane explains.There seems no doubt about the role of various cultural activists in building solidarity among the youth, inspired by Black Consciousness philosophy. Writers, poets, dancers, singers and painters captured the injustice of apartheid, and some of these works are on display.Build-up to 16 JuneBut it is generally agreed that tensions in schools had been growing from February 1976, when two teachers at the Meadowlands Tswana School Board were dismissed for their refusal to teach in Afrikaans.Students and teachers throughout Soweto echoed this sentiment, and the African Teachers’ Association of South Africa presented a memorandum to this effect to the Education Department. From mid-May around a dozen schools went on strike, and several students refused to write mid-year exams.On 16 June, students from three schools – Belle Higher Primary, Phefeni Junior Secondary and Morris Isaacson High – planned to march from their schools to the Orlando Stadium, about a kilometre from the museum, to hold a meeting. But before they got to where the museum stands today the police met them, in Moema Street.There are conflicting accounts of who gave the first command to shoot, but soon children were turning and running in all directions, leaving some children lying wounded on the road – among them Hector Pieterson and Hastings Ndlovu.A major part of the museum’s presentation of the story of the day is done through TV monitors, recording the world’s footage of the events, as South Africa had only just got television. Text panels scattered throughout the museum give eye-witness accounts and background viewpoints.Inside the museumThe museum is arranged in a series of interleading spaces joined by ramps, moving you closer to Nzima’s photograph – enlarged and waiting for you at the top of the second ramp.The interior is dominated by red brick walls, with some areas plastered and painted white and black, and others left in grey concrete. Large square windows at the top of the ramps give views of the suburb’s significant sites: Orlando Stadium, the Orlando Police Station, Moema Street, and several schools. Combined with black steel banisters and high ceilings, the effect is stunning.One of the few walled-in rooms in the museum is the Death Register, the room that records the names of the children who died over the period from June 1976 to the end of 1977.But the day, and the events that followed, had positive consequences. Thousands of students joined the broader liberation movement, ensuring that resistance to apartheid was maintained and escalated. International solidarity movements added to pressure on the apartheid government.The use of Afrikaans as a medium of instruction was dropped. More schools and a teacher training college were built in Soweto. Teachers were given in-service training, and encouraged to upgrade their qualifications by being given study grants.And most importantly, urban blacks were given permanent resident status in South Africa. Before, they had been considered “temporary sojourners” with permanent residence only in the designated homelands, often inferior pieces of land far away from industrial centres and jobs.Like the Apartheid Museum at Johannesburg’s Gold Reef City, this much smaller museum – the first museum in Soweto – has a simplicity which allows the drama of the story to have maximum impact.What became of them?What became of some of the chief protagonists of 16 June 1976?Sam NzimaNzima, who took six sequence shots of 12-year-old Pieterson in those brief moments, left Johannesburg for Limpopo – then the northern Transvaal – about a year later, when it became clear that his safety in the city was under threat. “The security branch phoned me and told me to go to John Vorster Square, but I went into hiding for three weeks,” he says.The harassment didn’t stop after he left the city. “In 1978 the security branch from Nelspruit phoned and told me that they knew of my whereabouts and what I had done.”Nzima set up a bottle store after he settled up north, and later served as a member of parliament in the homeland Gazankulu government. He opened a school of photography in Bushbuckridge after being donated a black and white enlarger by The Sowetan newspaper.“There is an art to developing black and white pictures”, he says.When the Independent Group bought Argus newspapers in 1999, he was given copyright to his Hector photographs.Theuns ‘Rooi Rus’ SwanepoelThe police commander who is believed to have given the command to fire on the schoolchildren on the day, Theuns “Rooi Rus” Swanepoel, was described by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in 1998 as a policeman “who already had a long history of human rights violations as chief interrogator of the security branch”.Swanepoel told the TRC: “I made my mark. I let it be known to the rioters I would not tolerate what was happening. I used appropriate force. In Soweto and Alexandra where I operated, that broke the back of the organisers.”Die Afrikaner, the far-rightwing Herstigte Nasionale Party mouthpiece, gives the following version of how the first shot was fired in Orlando West: “In the heat of the struggle, (Swanepoel) and his men are called in from leave to stop a mass of seething, threatening youths. The atmosphere is laden and then one of the blacks throws a bottle into the face of the Red Russian (“Rooi Rus”).“A war breaks out as the young men let loose on the seething crowds and the one responsible for throwing the bottle looks like chicken mesh after the automatic machine gun flattens him.”Swanepoel allegedly lost his right eye in the incident. He died of a heart attack in 1998 at the age of 71.Mbuyisa MakhuboMbuyisa Makhubo, the schoolboy who picked up Hector, was harassed by the police after the incident and eventually went into exile. His mother, Nombulelo Makhubo, told the TRC that she received a letter from him from Nigeria in 1978, but that she had not heard from him since. She died in 2004.Antoinette SitholeAntoinette Sithole, Hector’s older sister and one of five sisters, still lives in Soweto. She was 17 in June 1976.“On the day, I was hiding in the second house next to my school Phefeni High School,” Antoinette says. “There were younger children at the march who shouldn’t have been there. I don’t know why they were there – Hector was one of them. There were random shots, we were not familiar with teargas shots. I was confused, those first shots could have been teargas.“I came out of hiding and saw Hector, and I called him to me. He was looking around as I called his name, trying to see who was calling him. I waved at him, he saw me and came over to me. I asked him what he was doing here, we looked around, there was a shot, and I ran back to my hiding place. When I looked out I couldn’t see Hector, I waited, I was afraid, where was he?“Then I saw a group of boys struggling. This gentleman came from nowhere, lifted a body, and I saw the front part of the shoe which I recognised as Hector’s. This man started to run with the body, I ran alongside, and said to him: who are you, this is my brother?“A car stopped in front of us, a lady got out and said she was from the press, and offered us a lift to the clinic. We put him in the car. I don’t remember how I got to the clinic, but the doctor said Hector was dead so I gave his details.“I was so scared of how I was going to tell my mother. Two teachers from a nearby school took me to my grandmother’s house. A neighbour phoned my mother at work, and when she got home at 5.30pm my uncle was standing outside the house with me. She said she had heard on the radio that children had died. My uncle broke the news – she was calm, she showed no emotion.“My father lived in Alexandra – my parents are divorced – he saw the picture in the paper and recognised me and wondered why I wasn’t at school.“My mother’s strength – she was stronger than my father – helped me come to terms with death. I can accept now that we are all going to die.“My mother is still alive and still very strong. She still lives in the same house in Soweto. Hector was her only son, and since the uprising she has lost one of my younger sisters in a car accident.“To me and my family, Hector did not die in vain.”Source: City of JohannesburgWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Demandbase Brings Real-Time Customer Identification to B2B Marketing

first_imgThe idea here is that by being able to identify your visitors even before you render a page for them, you can cater your website to these visitors and increase your chance of converting these visitors into paying customers. This technology also comes in handy when it comes to registration forms. Instead of asking visitors for their company information when they want to download a white paper, for example, Demandbase already has this information. Integrates with Existing ToolsDemandbase provides its customers with an API, so they can integrate this information with their existing customer management and business intelligence solutions. The company claims that it can correctly identify 83% of U.S. business traffic and that its real-time solution can identify a customer within 5 milliseconds. The company currently identifies about 200 million Web visits to B2B websites each month.New Today: LivePerson IntegrationStarting today, Demandbase is also bringing its technology to LivePerson, the popular live chat solution for businesses websites. Thanks to this, a company that implements Demandbase’s solution can now, for example, ensure that chats on their website are routed to the right specialists, and instead of having to gather basic information from these customers in the chat, the agents can immediately provide relevant information to their customers. What would you do if you knew exactly who was coming to your site and were able to tailor your site accordingly? With Demandbase‘s B2B-focused Real-Time ID service, businesses can now identify information about a visitor’s company, including industry, size, location and revenue before they even render their sites. In addition, they can also identify if that visitor is already a customer. Thanks to this, businesses can now, for example, tailor their marketing messages and advertising on their home pages for every visitor, and show them just those messages and white papers that are relevant to their businesses.Demandbase’s solution is based on the company’s extensive database of company IP addresses. While regular reverse IP lookup services often only reply with the address of a company’s ISP, Demandbase has created its own proprietary database that goes beyond this and provides far more detailed information. The company has also partnered with various data providers like Dun & Bradstreet, Jigsaw, Edgar Online, Harte-Hanks, Hoovers and LexisNexis that allow it to display relevant company data. Related Posts Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of… IT + Project Management: A Love Affair frederic lardinois Tags:#enterprise#news#Real-Time Web last_img read more

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Premier League Aubameyang gives Arsenal winning start at Newcastle

first_imgNewcastle: Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang fired Arsenal to a 1-0 win at Newcastle in their Premier League opener on Sunday, providing hope of an improved run this season for Unai Emery’s side. The Gunners finished last season in turmoil after blowing their bid for a top-four place with a disastrous spell in the final weeks. Adding to Emery’s woes, Arsenal were crushed by Chelsea in the Europa League final to shatter their dreams of Champions League qualification. But Arsenal have enjoyed a profitable close-season, with a host of new signings raising morale around the Emirates Stadium. And Aubameyang gave Arsenal fans renewed belief they can get back in the top four this term with a typically predatory second-half finish to give the north Londoners a winning start. Also Read – Puducherry on top after 8-wkt win over ChandigarhArsenal had a wretched away record last season, keeping just one clean sheet on their travels, so taking three points without conceding was the perfect way to turn over a new leaf. Their often-criticised defence held firm, with centre-backs Calum Chambers and Sokratis keeping Newcastle at bay. Aubameyang’s strike ruined Newcastle manager Steve Bruce’s first match in charge of the club he supported as a boy. Bruce left second-tier Sheffield Wednesday to join Newcastle in the close-season following the departure of fan favourite Rafael Benitez, who had grown tired of a lack of backing from controversial owner Mike Ashley. Bruce’s appointment was hardly greeted with widespread joy on Tyneside and the season started with Newcastle fans staging a protest against Ashley in the streets and then boycotting the match in large enough numbers to leave numerous empty seats around St James’ Park. Also Read – Vijender’s next fight on Nov 22, opponent to be announced laterEmery’s decision to leave new signings David Luiz, Dani Ceballos and Nicolas Pepe on the bench was rewarded by a determined, if only sporadically cohesive, display from his team. There were starts for 19-year-old academy graduates Reiss Nelson and Joe Willock, but Mesut Ozil and Sead Kolasinac were absent after two men were arrested following a fresh incident after the pair were the victims of an attempted car-jacking in July.last_img read more

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Skincare tips for women above 40

first_imgAfter 40, it is very important for a woman to choose the right skin care regime and make-up. Always hydrate your skin before applying the foundation and opt for peach or pink blush, says experts. Make-up artists Bhumika Bahri and Niti Luthra have listed down some techniques for women above the age of 40.Skincare as an investment: Investing in good skin care routine is the first step towards enhancing your skin. As we touch 40 our skin becomes dry and wrinkles start to appear. A good moisturizer and anti-aging serum will revive your skin. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfPrep and prime: The skin should be prepped properly for an even base. Primer plays an important role for a lesser base. Use concealer and contouring for a defined base.Balanced skin tone: Foundation with hydrating formulas work best after 40 as the skin becomes thin and makes the complexion dull. Hydrating foundation brings back the colour of the skin. Liquid formulas work best as it will not settle in the fine lines. Warm colours and yellow undertones balances the skin tone. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsivePeach or pink blush: Women above 40 years of age are advised to use peach and pink blush to add colour to their skin. It will add natural healthy glow to the cheekbones.Enhance your eyes: Eye shadows should be of warm tones. Using matte browns or neutral toned eye shadows would define the eyes. Use kohl or gel eyeliner along with mascara to give a softer look.Fuller lips: As we age our lips become thin and dry. Using lip liner would give fuller lip effect. Matte lipsticks with a dab of gloss in the center will give plumpness to the lips. Light and bright shades should be used as per the skin tone.last_img read more

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Shifting focus towards individual wellness this yoga day

first_imgThe Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi, one of the most distinguished addresses in the Capital celebrated International Day of Yoga with patrons and hotel associates as a part of its endeavour to encourage healthy and responsible living.On the occasion, the hotel undertook various initiatives to bring focus on the ancient Indian tradition of Yoga and to encourage people to take up the discipline that ultimately leads to harmony and peace, both, within and outside oneself. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfAn hour-long yoga session for in-house guests was conducted at Longchamp, a stunning rooftop at the Hotel. The sessions for guests as well as the associates were led by Harjas Kaur, a certified hatha yoga teacher who has been practicing and teaching for the past 7 years. Post the session, guests savoured refreshing and healthy beverages prepared using fresh ingredients of the season such as banana and chia seed smoothie, lemon grass and grapefruit water, tender coconut shikanji complemented with some nourishing options like boiled egg with cous cous multigrain buns, Israeli cucumber with mint rye bread, granola bars, whole fruits, and amla candies. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveTo mark the occasion, the hotel also designed special wristbands from recycled material that were placed in-room as a turndown offering for the guests. The Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi endeavors to contribute meaningfully to conservation and environmental protection through initiatives such as this.Speaking on the occasion, Satyajeet Krishnan, Area Director – North and General Manager, The Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi, said, “In recent times, the ancient Indian practice of Yoga has gained international recognition. It gives us great pleasure to encourage the discipline amongst our guests as well as our own associates. Our chefs have always encouraged healthy eating as a way to aid our evolving lifestyle and this is one more occasion where we bring focus on maintaining individual wellness.”last_img read more

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Learning job skills

first_imgDeveloping a proactive system to identify prospective needs and prepare graduates for an uncertain future is a major challenge that educational institutions must face by developing linkages with the labor market and tailoring programmes to match their demands. COL’s (Commonwealth of Learning) President and CEO, Professor Asha Kanwar spoke about these challenges and other emerging trends in her keynote speech at the Asian Association of Open Universities (AAOU) 32nd annual conference in Vietnam recently. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfIn the presentation titled ‘Human Resource Development and Lifelong Learning for Open Universities’, Professor Kanwar encouraged open universities to strengthen their outreach to wider constituencies, including the unreached, and integrate employability by responding to market needs. She called for more investments in innovative learning and the re-imagining of policies and practices to suit lifelong learners at different stages of their lives. To prepare learners for employment and entrepreneurship, Professor Kanwar proposed the integration of three essential illiteracy in schools’ curricular – human, data and technological. Human literacy will help learners make ethical choices to equip them for social engagement through effective communication. Data literacy, which is essential in a world driven by technology, will enable learners to find meaning in the flood of existing information. Lastly, technological literacy will help learners to deploy software and hardware in order to maximize their powers to achieve and create. Founded in 1987, the AAOU is a non-profit organisation of higher learning institutions concerned with open and distance education in Asia.last_img read more

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