Harvard Business School launches Gender Initiative

first_img Read Full Story In an effort to further the advancement of women leaders worldwide, Harvard Business School (HBS) has launched the Gender Initiative to support research, teaching, and knowledge dissemination that promotes gender equity in business and society. The new initiative will be headed by Robin Ely, the School’s Diane Doerge Wilson Professor of Business Administration and senior associate dean for culture and community.Inspiration for the Gender Initiative emerged during the 2013 commemoration of the School’s 50th anniversary of admitting women to its two-year M.B.A. program. As part of that celebration, HBS hosted its first Gender & Work Symposium, an annual gathering of top gender researchers and practitioners.“One of the main goals Harvard Business School wants to achieve with the Gender Initiative is to ground discussions about gender in rigorous research so that people can make better-informed decisions for themselves, their families, their companies, and their communities,” Ely said. “So much of what people think they know about gender is simply not substantiated by empirical evidence but instead is based on gender stereotypes. We want to develop the initiative so that Harvard Business School becomes the ‘go-to place’ on gender issues, where both researchers and practitioners can come together to find ways to advance gender equity in the workplace and help both women and men lead whole, fulfilled, and sustainable lives.”last_img read more

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A bridge for promising research

first_imgA few years ago, Andrew Myers’ laboratory discovered a new way to synthesize an important class of antibiotics that one day could tackle the toughest, most resistant infections.“I knew we were onto something important,” said Myers, the Amory Houghton Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, “but I couldn’t get federal funding to take the idea any further.”Now, an effort to advance those antibiotic candidates is among 12 advanced research projects in laboratories across Harvard that will receive support through the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator.“These projects represent leading-edge biomedical research at Harvard,” said President Drew Faust. “Several of these researchers are pursuing new treatments for diabetes, leukemia, and serious infections. Others are creating faster, safer, and more affordable diagnostic tools. In each of these impressive projects, the patients’ needs are at the heart of the endeavor. Their work exemplifies how universities like Harvard make substantive contributions to addressing global problems.”The Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator was launched in 2007 by Harvard’s Office of Technology Development (OTD) as the Biomedical Accelerator Fund, and expanded in 2013 through a major gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation. The accelerator helps to ensure that when advanced academic research is considered too early stage for industry or venture investment, resources are available to develop the technology further and bridge the funding gap.“Harvard’s world-class biomedical research programs have all the right ingredients to produce profoundly impactful technologies in major disease areas,” said Len Blavatnik, M.B.A. ’89. “The accelerator helps Harvard’s life-science innovators combine their passion for discovery with the business expertise they need to see their ideas succeed in the outside world.”The 12 research projects receiving funding during 2015–16 span the Harvard campus and reflect the diversity of translational biomedical research at the University. Several researchers aim to develop new therapies for hard-to-treat diseases:David Knipe, the Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Harvard Medical School (HMS), will develop a strategy to limit herpes simplex virus infections by targeting a protein that his lab has recently shown to regulate latent infection, helping prevent the virus from becoming active and causing more serious disease.Matthew Shair, professor in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, will develop novel small-molecule therapeutics targeting an enzyme recently implicated in obesity and cancer.Chad Cowan, associate professor in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and assistant professor of medicine at HMS, will use genome editing to address some fundamental limitations of new T-cell-based therapies that would treat various diseases, including cancer.Myers will leverage a unique chemical platform to synthesize novel antimicrobial molecules and evaluate their potential for treating multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections.Other researchers will address the challenges associated with delivering new treatments to the tissues that need them most:Neel Joshi, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, will attempt to engineer probiotic bacteria to deliver therapeutics for gastrointestinal disease directly to the gut, avoiding unwanted systemic effects.Quan Lu, associate professor of environmental genetics and pathophysiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, will test the ability of natural microvesicles known as ARMMs to deliver large therapeutic proteins to cells.Other promising projects will investigate more fundamental questions, hoping to identify areas where new drugs could make a difference:Stephen Liberles, associate professor of cell biology at HMS, will conduct research into newly discovered neurons and receptors within the vagus nerve that play a key role in gut-to-brain signaling. This research could lead to new therapeutic approaches for conditions such as obesity, diabetes, and disorders of intestinal transit.Richard T. Lee, professor in the Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and professor of medicine at HMS, will investigate a hormone associated with exercise to explore its therapeutic potential in diabetes and other metabolic diseases.David Scadden, the Gerald and Darlene Jordan Professor of Medicine at HMS and professor of stem cell and regenerative biology, aims to tackle leukemia by identifying and validating new biological targets that regulate the survival and drug resistance of cancer cells.David Sinclair, professor of genetics at HMS, will use computational methods to identify novel peptides as potential therapeutic agents for mitochondrial diseases.Two other researchers aim to improve diagnostic and imaging technologies, providing valuable insight into a patient’s current state of health:Peng Yin, associate professor of systems biology at HMS and a core faculty member at the Wyss Institute, will develop a diagnostic platform to quickly and accurately detect circulating tumor DNA in blood, providing a new, noninvasive tool for cancer diagnosis.Daniel Needleman, associate professor of applied physics at the Harvard Paulson School and associate professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, will advance a noninvasive imaging technique to improve the success rate of assisted reproductive technologies such as in-vitro fertilization.In addition to supporting early stage, highly promising biomedical technologies in research laboratories across the University, the accelerator is associated with a fellowship program at Harvard Business School (HBS). Through this fellowship, recent M.B.A. graduates gain experience in life-science entrepreneurship by engaging with the projects supported by the accelerator. The Blavatnik Fellows in Life Science Entrepreneurship take up residence at the Harvard Innovation Lab (i-lab) and participate in business development activities, forming new entrepreneurial ventures around emerging technologies when opportunities arise. The 2015-16 Fellows were named on August 17.“The HBS Blavatnik Fellows are an outstanding group of entrepreneurs,” said Vicki L. Sato, professor of management practice at HBS, who oversees the fellows program and serves on the accelerator’s advisory board. “As HBS alumni with significant previous entrepreneurial experience, the fellows bring business capabilities that can enhance the effective commercialization of exciting new technologies. The opportunity to work with excellent innovators in the context of the Harvard i-lab represents a unique opportunity for the Blavatnik Fellows to launch great businesses.”To date, the Blavatnik Biomedical Accelerator has provided $12.5 million to support 68 research projects, approximately half of which have led to industry partnerships. Macrolide Pharmaceuticals, for example, was launched as a startup this year to commercialize antibiotic drug candidates developed in Myers’ laboratory after he received accelerator funding for that work in 2013–14.Besides the Blavatnik accelerator, Harvard OTD manages the Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Accelerator, a more nascent fund that has supported 10 projects since its creation in 2013. The PSE Accelerator helped launch three startups in its first year, commercializing innovations in 3-D printing, materials science, and robotics.“The accelerators provide essential funding for translational research,” said Isaac Kohlberg, senior associate provost and chief technology development officer. “Just as importantly, they foster an entrepreneurial culture in which innovation can thrive.”last_img read more

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NAMI-ND hosts Mental Illness Awareness Week

first_imgWei Lin | The Observer Editor’s Note: This is the first installment in a five-day series discussing mental health at Notre Dame in recognition of Mental Illness Awareness Week.Each night during the first week of October, a green light illuminates Touchdown Jesus on Hesburgh Library. But the light isn’t meant to cheer on the Irish football team.The green light marks the annual Irish State of Mind Week, the University’s recognition of National Mental Illness Awareness Week.Events this week, planned by Notre Dame’s chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI-ND), were designed to raise awareness and spark conversations across campus about mental illness.Junior Katie Paige, president of NAMI-ND, said the purpose of the week is to encourage discussions about mental illness, with the ultimate goal of increasing mental health throughout the Notre Dame community.“Through Irish State of Mind, NAMI joins the fight to end stigma, provide support, educate the Notre Dame and the South Bend community and stand in solidarity with those who are struggling with mental illness,” Paige said.Junior Joseph Yoon, service coordinator for NAMI-ND, said he believes Irish State of Mind Week provides an outlet for individuals to talk about mental health.“I don’t think there’s any tangible goal,” he said. “It’s about being able to provide different events that anyone can go to. It’s about being able to provide a week where we can focus on different aspects of dealing with mental health and being able to reach out to the community in every way we can.”For Monday night, NAMI-ND organized “Food for Thought,” a dinner and discussion led by Susan Steibe-Pasalich, director of the University Counseling Center (UCC), and Erica Kelsey, a consultant for the Campus Assessment and Response Education Team. The event will be held at 6 p.m. in Jordan 105.Yoon said NAMI aims to educate students about the resources available on campus through the event.The club will host “In Our Own Words” on Tuesday night in the LaFortune Ballroom. Paige said the event, where 10 Notre Dame students will share their own stories describing the ways in which mental illness has affected their lives, proved successful last year.“I think that it’s a really tangible way to break down the stigma, to have Notre Dame students be actually talking about their own experiences,” she said.Wednesday night, students will gather at the Grotto to celebrate Mass during “an evening of prayer and remembrance for those whose lives have been touched by mental illness,” according to the NAMI-ND Facebook page.Kevin Breel, a TEDx Talk speaker, will talk about his own experiences with depression Thursday at 7 p.m. in DeBartolo 102. Breel will share his message of hope in the face of mental illness, Yoon said.“[Breel] has millions of views on his Ted Talk,” he said. “Being able to bring someone who’s actually been public about his struggle with mental illness is, I think, a great way to bring everybody in because he’ll be a great speaker and be able to draw a lot of attention to the week.”NAMI-ND and student government will wrap up the week by screening “Inside Out” in Washington Hall at 7 p.m. Friday.Paige said she hopes Irish State of Mind Week will have long-lasting effects by changing the way students discuss the topic of mental health on campus.“I think that a lot of people don’t know how to approach mental health,” she said. “It’s very taboo. People aren’t sure how to give their friends help, and they aren’t sure how to ask for help. I just want people to start talking about it and be more open about it.”NAMI-ND began planning and fundraising for Irish State of Mind Week last spring with the help of Student Government, the UCC and other organizations from Notre Dame and South Bend, Paige said.University President Emeritus Fr. Edward “Monk” Malloy reflected on his personal experiences with mental illness at the Irish State of Mind kickoff event Friday.Malloy described his time working at St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in Washington D.C., a federal psychiatric facility for patients with severe cases of mental illness.“I got to know people who were in jail initially for murder and rape and arson and robbery and any kind of thing that you can imagine,” Malloy said. “By reading their files, I saw some of the horrible things they had done, but I also came to appreciate that many of them seemed like everyone else that I knew.“I learned that you just don’t know by reading the file or what they’re accused of doing what potential they have for establishing a new life at some point in the future.”Malloy said it is important to consider the different degrees of mental illness, noting that a number of students at the University suffer from some level of anxiety, depression or addiction, among other mental illnesses.“No matter who you’re talking about or what dorm you live in … there are people at any given moment who are struggling with one kind of level of mental illness or another,” he said.The Notre Dame residence hall system helps provide support for students struggling with mental illness, Malloy said.“I know in orientation, we try to make the case that whatever you’re struggling with — whether it’s homesickness or some problem in your family or personal health issues or whatever it might be — there are people available, willing and able to be there for you and to be motivated to maintain those kinds of relationships in the long term,” he said.Malloy said Irish State of Mind Week should encourage students to reach out to others who may feel alone, abandoned, stigmatized, forgotten or unworthy, using Jesus’ healing ministry as an example for action.“The tangible symbol … of green on Touchdown Jesus is a colorful way of expressing [that] we are trying to evolve into a community of caring, of tender concern and of light for those who sometimes are overwhelmed by the darkness,” he said.Tags: Fr. Edward Malloy, Irish State of Mind, Irish State of Mind Week, Mental health, mental health awareness, mental illness, NAMI-ND, Touchdown Jesuslast_img read more

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Notre Dame Campus Ministry features variety of groups

first_imgNotre Dame’s Campus Ministry program is one of the largest in the country, so its staff is always preparing events and meetings for students on campus to further their faith.“Campus Ministry is committed to cultivating the faith of all Notre Dame students,” Tami Schmitz, associate director of student ministry, said in an email. “Campus Ministry ministers faithfully and fervently to all students, regardless of denomination, faith tradition or level of education.”Some of the programs Campus Ministry sponsors include musical groups and undergraduate ministries. Within the undergraduate ministries, Campus Ministry has a wide variety of options for students already engaged in their faith or interested in exploring the Christian faith further.“Campus Ministry creates an atmosphere where our students feel cared for, supported and empowered to reach their full potential. We also try to offer a variety of programs and events in an attempt to meet a variety of students wherever they are on their journey of faith,” Schmitz said.Kayla August, the assistant director of evangelization, oversees several Campus Ministry programs, such as weekly adoration in the chapel; the Catholic Identity Association, which supports Catholic student groups on campus; the Muslim Student Association and the Jewish Student Association.August also works with Iron Sharpens Iron, an interdenominational group that meets weekly for praise and worship and to hear witness talks, and the Compass Freshman Fellowship, an opportunity for freshmen to meet and discuss Christ.“These programs help students of varying faiths find a true relationship with God,” August said in an email. “College is often the first time students are away from home. In college, they discover who God is to them instead of just who he was to their parents. … Each encounter is a gateway to a relationship with God. Each experience and encounter reveals who God is and invites them to share in life with Him.”Another Campus Ministry program open to undergraduate students is Jamii, which is hosted on the first Sunday of every month at 9 p.m. in the St. Andre Room of the Coleman-Morse Center. The meetings are hosted by the African and African American Ministry and feature Bible study, prayer and community-building activities.Imanne Mondane, a senior and Campus Ministry multicultural ministry Anchor intern, said she thinks all students should participate in Jamii.“No matter what stage of your faith you would consider yourself at, no matter what religion you identify with, no matter your knowledge or background of the Bible of Christianity, there is something here for you,” Mondane said. “There is someone you can connect with and share your story. We really believe there is power in sharing your spirituality and spiritual journey with others, and when we gather together, something incredible happens: We are able to encounter one another in the most pure form possible.”Mondane said Jamii allows students to build relationships with others as well as themselves and God, which is why she enjoys participating.“I love having the chance to foster my relationship with God in such an open and nonjudgmental setting, and also being able to learn more about myself and new ways to grow as a person and child of God,” she said.Brett Perkins, the assistant director of sacramental preparation and catechesis, runs a separate Campus Ministry program called Christ for the Curious. The program runs four times each year in three- to five-week sessions.The current session started Thursday and will run for four Thursdays from 7 p.m. through 8 p.m. in the St. Andre Room. The sessions can stand alone, but collectively they will explore crucial moments in Jesus’ life, such as his birth, baptism and last supper. The meetings include food and a reflection from a campus “leader-in-faith,” such as a rector, priest or sister.“Christ for the Curious is perfect for individuals of any faith background or level of faith experience, or none at all; all that’s required is an open mind and heart,” Perkins said in an email. “Regardless of one’s faith, I think nearly all would agree that Jesus has got to be one of the most intriguing people who ever lived.”Perkins said some students attend Christ for the Curious to help with their theology studies on campus, others are international students and others are life-long Catholics looking to reengage with their faith.Combined, the Campus Ministry programs offered during the semester allow students to encounter their faith in various ways, no matter their faith background.“Campus Ministry provides experiences, tools, and opportunities to help students grow into the people God created them to be,” Schmitz said. “These opportunities not only help students deepen their own faith lives, but also they often help develop deep, meaningful friendships.”Tags: Campus Ministry, christ for the curious, coleman-morse, leaders in faithlast_img read more

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Man dies after fall on campus before football game

first_imgA 57-year-old man died Sunday after falling before the Notre Dame-North Carolina State football game Saturday, Steve Dixon, a friend who accompanied the man to the game, said.The man, who Dixon identified as Michael Hile, was taken off life support around 1:30 p.m. at Memorial Hospital on Sunday. Dixon said two Notre Dame students attempted to resuscitate Hile when he fell on Notre Dame Avenue, and a large crowd of people gathered to offer their support. Dixon said he wanted to thank those students and the Notre Dame community for their help during the incident.“They were doing everything they could to change this tragic event and change the outcome,” he said. “ … ‘We are ND.’ I’ve heard that crowd say that many times, but I truly have a different love and understanding for that phrase. ND stood across the street and stopped and prayed and cared — supported me whether they knew they were supporting me or not.”Hile’s death marks the third fatal incident over the course of the last two Notre Dame football games, as two fans who attended the Notre Dame-USC game Oct. 21 died within hours of each other.Tags: Death, fan, footballlast_img read more

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South Korean president vows to close half of nation’s coal plants by 2034

first_imgSouth Korean president vows to close half of nation’s coal plants by 2034 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Power Magazine:South Korea’s president said the country will shutter 30 more coal-fired power plants by 2034, and bring additional solar and wind power resources online in the next five years in order to meet emissions reductions targets.President Moon Jae-in made the announcement Sept. 8 in a speech he delivered virtually for the United Nations’ International Day for Clean Air for blue skies event. The president said his administration will close 10 of those operating coal-fired plants by the end of 2022. He also has called for the country to phase out nuclear power.South Korea has about 60 operating coal plants, which generate about 40% of the country’s electricity. The country over the past three years has implemented temporary shutdowns of plants that are more than 30 years old, including idling about half the coal-fired fleet earlier this year in an effort to reduce air pollution.Jae-in also said South Korea will more than triple the number of operating solar and wind power installations by 2025, compared with the number online as of 2019. The country also will provide incentives to increase the number of electric vehicles on its roads to 1.13 million, up from the current 110,000, and to increase the number of hydrogen-powered vehicles to 200,000, up from the current 8,000.“The government will work with the people to bring back the blue skies with more powerful environmental policies,” Jae-in said. The president said the targets announced Monday are in line with his administration’s goals to produce more energy from low-carbon sources, and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.Jae-in’s administration has ended construction of any new coal-fired power plants—the country in 2017, the year Jae-in took office, reached a new high for coal-fired power generation—while supporting renewable energy resources, including the use of fuel cells. He said in his speech Monday that climate change has become “the most important problem in our generation,” noting the country has been hit with three major typhoons in a two-week period in late August and early September. He emphasized that the country needs clean air, in part to help combat the coronavirus pandemic, and also to promote economic growth.[Darrell Proctor]More: South Korea will close half its coal-fired fleetlast_img read more

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The story behind the visual identity of the House of Art Arsen, a new great cultural and creative story of Šibenik

first_imgThe author duo believes that every visual identity must largely reflect space and what happens in it, and that it is inconceivable that space, whether public or private, is not visually thought out and connected to what it represents. During the process of working on the solution, it became clear what message they want to convey with a visual identity – In this case, Arsen is an artist and educator who attracts the audience to himself, and the space that bears his name has an open door for everyone.. With the completion of the renovation of the former Odeon cinema hall and its transformation into a new city public space intended for music and stage events, cinema screenings, theater performances, exhibitions and conferences, Šibenik got a new excellent quality space that will surely breathe new rhythm into the city. After the space was renamed at the beginning of the year – Arsen House of Art, Šibenik Fortress of Culture (which was given the management of the space) announced a call for a visual identity whose recognizability, originality and modernity will reflect the purpose of the space and program content. towards customers, partners and the public. According to the Šibenik Fortress of Culture, the work of the author’s team was selected from as many as 33 applicants Plac Studio. Behind the name are two creatives from Zagreb – Roko Jurjević and Ivan Klanac – better known to most as Roko and Klanac. JU Tvrđava kulture Šibenik is involved in the completion of the adaptation project together with the city, and the Institution is also entrusted with the future management of the renovated hall. It is the Šibenik Fortress of Culture that has proposed a name that pays tribute to one of the greatest artists of recent Croatian history: academic musician, individual and intellectual, composer, singer-songwriter, painter, arranger, translator, silent craftsman and poet of general practice, Šibenik musician and artistic genius – Arsen Dedić This is exactly what the biggest challenge in the project is related to – finding a creative solution that would meet the character and work of Arsen Dedić and a multimedia gathering space, or merging the tradition represented by Arsen and the future of space. We perceive Šibenik as a city rich in history, culture and, above all, inspiring people, the authors point out and add “We started a discussion about what the Arsen House of Art is and what kind of identity could be developed. We presented the project task to a friend and fellow designer Aleksandar Obrenović, with whom we started further elaboration. We were guided by proposing a quality and applicable solution and in some way paying tribute to Arsen and the people of Šibenik, whom he represented through his artistic work. “center_img Photo: Šibenik Fortress of Culture “We are aware of the greatness of the character and work of Arsen Dedić, the influence he had on Šibenik, Croatia and even the world. To this day, our parents keep his records and tapes, and one of us even had a chance to meet him. We really researched everything, from Arsen’s music and poetry, his first designed single, to the history of Šibenik and the former Odeon cinema. Somewhere in the middle, when we already had the concept sketches, we reached for the project task again to match the concept to the needs.. At the end of the process, we reviewed everything we had prepared and finalized only what we were completely satisfied with and what we think met all the criteria. And what we have chosen you have the opportunity to see in the final solution”” Say Roko Jurjevic and Ivan Klanac. The authors of the paper also emphasized that the process always begins with a conversation that very quickly grows into ideas that are later transferred to paper (or screen) and continue to grow and develop. As the design process is complex and different for everyone, they point out that Arsen’s music accompanied them through this one, and it took about a month from idea to realization. Finally, the authors emphasize how design essentially problem solving so it is critically observed that way. “Has a particular design solved the problem of visibility and brand recognition as such? If, if you have noticed and remembered it, the problem has been solved and the designer has done his task properly together with the client” The intention of the House of Art Arsen is to gather, to be a place for performances, conferences and workshops, and the visual code that emphasizes openness should help to become a recognizable place in Šibenik, but also in Croatia.last_img read more

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PREMIUMRiver troops: Jakarta’s unsung heroes who try to keep city’s waterways clean

first_imgTopics : Log in with your social account Forgot Password ? Facebook Linkedin Google At a modest rest area on a riverbank in Palmerah district in West Jakarta, several workers from the Jakarta Environment Agency Water Bodies Unit took refuge from the blistering heat as they got ready to go back to work after their lunch break came to an end. The workers, wearing orange uniforms and matching rubber boots, are tasked by the agency with collecting trash to keep Jakarta’s rivers and riverbanks clean — no small feat in a city where littering remains a massive issue. After finishing their afternoon shift on Jan. 27, the three workers observed the results of their physically taxing work, which they do daily for the city.Every day, they row along the river on a floating platform and pick up the trash they find along the way. Small dump trucks drive along the riverbank to collect the trash, which is deposited every 200… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here RiverPollution river river-waste river-conservation clean-water cleaning waste WasteManagement trashlast_img read more

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Nicolas Pepe misses Arsenal’s clash with Barcelona at Camp Nou

first_imgNicolas Pepe misses Arsenal’s clash with Barcelona at Camp Nou Arsenal are also without Alexandre Lacazette against Barcelona after the French striker suffered an ankle injury in the 2-1 defeat against Lyon last Sunday.Meanwhile, Lucas Torreira is available after he was granted an extended break due to playing for Uruguay at the Copa America earlier this summer.Mesut Ozil and Sead Kolasinac also travelled to Barcelona after the pair were given time off following a recent attempted car-jacking.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing Arsenal Comment Nicolas Pepe completed his move to Arsenal earlier this week (Getty Images)Nicolas Pepe will miss Arsenal’s final pre-season friendly against Barcelona at Camp Nou on Sunday.The 24-year-old completed his move to the Gunners from Lille earlier this week for a club-record £72 million fee.But Arsenal fans have been made to wait to see their marquee signing in action as Pepe did not travel with Unai Emery’s 21-man squad to Spain.The decision to leave Pepe in London is simply a precautionary measure by Emery as the winger only started pre-season training on Friday and still lacks match fitness.ADVERTISEMENTArsenal have said that Pepe ‘has been given extra time to get up to speed’ along with Alex Iwobi and Mohamed Elneny, who also did not travel to Barcelona. Metro Sport ReporterSunday 4 Aug 2019 4:47 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link3.8kShares ARSENAL SQUAD VS BARCELONA GOALKEEPERS: Leno, MartinezDEFENDERS: Sokratis, Mustafi, Monreal, Kolasinac, Maitland-Niles, Chambers, ThompsonMIDFIELDERS: Ceballos, Ozil, Guendouzi, Torreira, Xhaka, Mkhitaryan, WillockATTACKERS: Aubameyang, Nketiah, Saka, Martinelli, Nelson Pepe started training with Arsenal on Friday (Getty Images)Pepe reached the quarter-finals with Ivory Coast at the Africa Cup of Nations in July and went on holiday to the United States after the tournament.AdvertisementAdvertisementThe winger flew straight from Miami earlier this week to finalise his move to Arsenal and has only had two sessions to build up his fitness.Pepe is now in a race to be available for Arsenal’s Premier League opener against Newcastle United next Sunday. Advertisement Advertisementlast_img read more

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No Criminal Libel: Media group wants criminal libel removed from statute books

first_img Share PORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad, CMC – The Association of Caribbean Media Workers (ACM) Tuesday called on regional governments to take action to erase the common law offences of criminal libel, including blasphemous, obscene and seditious libel from their statute books.In a message marking World Press Freedom Day, the regional media umbrella body said the politicians insist on retention of criminal defamation statutes despite the evidence that they pose a danger to free speech and freedom of the press.“In this regard, we call on the government of Jamaica and all other Caribbean community countries to take action to erase the common law offences of criminal libel including blasphemous, obscene and seditious libel from their statute books.“It is a position endorsed by a Joint Select Committee of the Jamaican parliament in 2008, following submission of the Justice Hugh Small Report that very year.”The ACM said that though the media landscape in the Caribbean is undergoing a measure of change, “such change is not being matched by a corresponding revolution in official mind-set.“Despite repeated promises, the government of Guyana persists in its refusal to award new radio broadcasting licenses and has used state advertising revenues as a tool of media punishment and reward.“The state media in Trinidad and Tobago still wrestle with the spectre of political control and there is evidence that a coercive broadcast content quota system will return, courtesy state regulators, to the front burner in due course.”ACM said that the majority of Caribbean Community (CARICOM) countries have also not passed access to information laws.“The presence of such laws is a prerequisite to declaration of the bona fides of a Caribbean country as one committed to transparency and accountability. In instances where such laws exist, it is also important to ensure they are truly providing unfettered access to official information in the way originally intended,” the ACM said.“We would further urge political figures to shun the inclination to blame media messengers in an attempt to vilify the media for stories unfavourable to them.”The ACM said that it has also taken note of the extent to which factors within the media industry itself are providing obstacles to the achievement of a truly free press.“Poor media performance, oppressive industrial relations environments, endemic self-censorship, incompetent media leadership and a lack of professional commitment by media practitioners provide a tragic basis for erosion of free expression and a free press.“We note with concern that the loss of jobs in the news media industry can serve to weaken the fabric of press freedom and free expression. This is particularly disconcerting when we witness declarations of increased corporate profits even as poor financial performance has been cited as the reason for layoffs and cutbacks. “The ACM said that together with its national affiliates and focal points, they are building a platform for media workers to undertake the work necessary to address some of these shortcomings.The ACM, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, said it was also looking forward “to the day the regional media leadership takes up the challenge as well.“Hopefully, like the media workers, the captains of the regional media industry will someday provide a united, cohesive front in the face of the new and old barriers to new and old frontiers, as they did in the past,” the ACM added. Sharing is caring! Share 12 Views   no discussionscenter_img NewsRegional No Criminal Libel: Media group wants criminal libel removed from statute books by: – May 3, 2011 Share Tweetlast_img read more

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