Bees Sweep Doubleheader In Tacoma

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Tacoma, WA) — The Salt Lake Bees earned a doubleheader sweep last night in Tacoma.The Bees won the opener 9-1, before taking the nightcap 7-6 in 10 innings.They played a doubleheader after Monday’s game was postponed due to the death of former Bees’ pitcher Tyler Skaggs.The series finale is tonight in Tacoma. Written by July 3, 2019 /Sports News – Local Bees Sweep Doubleheader In Tacomacenter_img Robert Lovelllast_img read more

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Is this the beginning of a leasehold mis-selling scandal?

first_imgA group of 500 newbuild property owners have instructed a leading law firm to seek compensation over their mis-sold leasehold apartments and houses which are within dozens of developments across the UK.FS Legal claims its clients were not advised properly about the terms of their ground rents and that, although they were told that their ground rents would increase, they weren’t informed about the consequences of the rises.The Manchester and Birmingham based legal firm says that if the current action is successful it will open the flood doors to the 100,000 house leaseholders said to be hidebound by poor advice about their leaseholds.NAEA Propertymark recently revealed that a third of these were now struggling to sell their homes and two thirds thought they were mis-sold their properties.The NAEA also says that 65% of these leaseholds bought their homes via the builders’ recommended solicitor.Hundreds of conveyancing firms have now been sent pre-action notifications by FS Legal, which has told The Negotiator that: “A hefty proportion of the clients we’re representing used the conveyancers that their developer or builder recommended to them”.FS Legal also says that because their clients were poorly informed, few realised until it was too late that their increasing ground rents would make it difficult for them to either later acquire the freehold or extend their lease.The conveyancing firms involved will now have to decide whether to contest what is in effect a class action against them or accept that they “have not provided advice to the standard they should have done”, FS legal says.leasehold scandal mis-sold leasehold NAEA FS legal October 17, 2018Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Home » News » Is this the beginning of a leasehold mis-selling scandal? previous nextRegulation & LawIs this the beginning of a leasehold mis-selling scandal?Legal firm launches class action on behalf of 500 property owners against dozens of solicitors, many of whom were those recommended by developers.Nigel Lewis17th October 201804,095 Viewslast_img read more

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Say No To Rightmove leader denies he’s working for other portals and calls for agents to ‘move together’

first_imgHome » News » COVID-19 news » Say No To Rightmove leader denies he’s working for other portals and calls for agents to ‘move together’ previous nextMarketingSay No To Rightmove leader denies he’s working for other portals and calls for agents to ‘move together’Exclusive: Rob Sargent of The Acorn Group submits himself to hard questioning over his motivations to set up and fund a campaign to persuade Rightmove to change its business and pricing.Nigel Lewis28th April 20205 Comments4,034 Views The figurehead of the Say No To Rightmove campaign has faced down the criticisms levelled against him and the organisation including how he must be in the pay of OTM or Zoopla, is about to launch his own portal and is receiving kickbacks.During a 40-minute grilling by Christopher Watkins via Zoom Rob Sargent, the CEO of 36-branch South of England agency the Acorn Group also reveals why he’s spending so much time and money attempting to weaken Rightmove and force it to rethink its business.Last week it was announced that the Say No To Rightmove campaign had joined forces with three other ‘Rightmove rebels’ groups. Sargent has confirmed that it now contains 1,400 agencies and approximately 2,800 branches.The Say No to Rightmove Campaign is undertaking a survey of agents and found that 75% said £500 a month was a fair price for the portal’s services, with the rest being prepared to pay between £500 and £1,000 a month.Commercial sweetenersSargent denies flatly during the interview that he has had any sweeteners or preferential deals from Zoopla or Rightmove other than his firm’s existing listings contracts with them or that he plans to launch his own portal.“I’ve rejected any further deals dialogue with Zoopla, and with OTM the Acorn Group has the original deal that I’ve made public in the past,” he says“We have the 75% Rightmove deal and a basic package because I’m out of contract with them. There are no special consideration or cash backs involved with either.”Sargent also says he is not out to promote OnTheMarket so that his Gold Membership share-holding becomes more valuable and that Acorn is looking to stay with the portal in the long term, and that it will be holding the shares for the long term.Why do it?Asked why he is spearheading the campaign, Sargent says he spent £500,000 with Rightmove in 2019 and that this huge cost has been a growing bone of contention with it for several years.“I’ve got the board’s backing and have the resources to mount this campaign, and I’ve had lots of support from agents up and down the country which is very motivating,” he says.“Rightmove are good but they are not good value. And the amount paid out to the portals relevant to the returns doesn’t feel quite right or fair now.“It’s difficult to wave a magic wand and just get from where we are today to the utopia of a more balanced portal environment, more innovation and greater competition.”Reduce Rightmove costsSargent says his group’s goal is to bring about a levelling out of the high prices charged by Rightmove but not kill it and instead persuade the portal’s leaders to adapt to the new reality brought about by Coronavirus and listen more.“We want a freer market that isn’t so monopolised by Rightmove,” he says. “It’s a big job to shift the network effect that’s been going on for a decade.“But there is no reason why portals have to charge us so much. We’re not going to do this overnight. Once agents realise that they can move together and can resist and say no, then the landscape will change. Rightmove have been dividing and conquering on a daily and weekly basis and it’s been going on too long.”Visit the Say No To Rightmove website.Watch the interview in full Say No To Rightmove Rob Sargent Rightmove April 28, 2020Nigel Lewis5 commentsChris Arnold, andsothestorybegan andsothestorybegan 28th April 2020 at 2:50 pmA strong man stands up to a bully. The strongest of men stand up for others.What cynical questions that would be more at home on PIE.If Facebook can offer its services for free, supported by advertising etc., I’m sure RM is quite capable of doing similar. It’s simply that agents acquiesse to bullying tactics because they are mistakenly under the impression that vendors demand such exposure.Nothing short of attempted character assisination of one who is trying to help the industry.Log in to ReplySam Samuel, Edward Ashdale Edward Ashdale 28th April 2020 at 11:50 amWell done Rob, very candid and I would invest my own resources if I could to this campaign too.You have our full support as well as the majority of estate agents in the industry.Change needs to happen and it will bring about a different landscape among the portals including OTM, who themselves have not really grasped it yet.Thanks for the interviewLog in to ReplyMurray Lee, Dreamview Estates Dreamview Estates 28th April 2020 at 10:34 amLoved the comment on the Rightmove review. 100% correct.Different language! LOLLog in to ReplyBryan Mansell, Gazeal Gazeal 28th April 2020 at 9:52 amThanks Chris and Rob great interview and very interesting times aheadLog in to ReplyMurray Lee, Dreamview Estates Dreamview Estates 28th April 2020 at 9:22 amGreat interview, great responses Keep up the good work RobWe are all right (move!??? LOL) behind youLog in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more

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Registration Still Open for Charity Fishing Tourney on Saturday

first_imgThe Exchange Club of Ocean City will host its 29th annual Fishing Tournament on Saturday, July 18.The boat registration fee is $175 to compete for cash prizes. The top prize for the heaviest flounder is $1,000, and the top prize for the heaviest bluefish is $1,000. Fishing is 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.Saturday’s weather forecast looks good, and it’s not too late for anybody to register. Visit www.ocexchangeclub.com or call Tournament Chairman Jon Batastini at 609-399-0035.Registration also will be accepted at the captain’s meeting 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, July 17, at the Ocean City VFW Post 6650 at 15th Street and Bay Avenue. The meeting will have entertainment, snacks and refreshments.All registered participants who attend the captain’s meeting are qualified to win a significant gift certificate to DiOrio’s Cafe in Somers Point — but to win you must also be at the Saturday awards ceremony when your number is called.The awards ceremony will be at All Seasons Marina in Marmora with music, food and beverages.Proceeds from the tournament will benefit the “Success by Six” program, which prepares Ocean City children to enter kindergarten ready to learn, and Family Promise of Cape May County, which assists children and families in times of need or crisis.The Exchange Club Mission Statement is “Exchange, America’s Premier Service Club working to make our communities better places to live.” In the last year, the Exchange Club of Ocean City has donated more than $80,000 in support of children, community and country. The Club donated $5,000 from the proceeds of last year’s fishing tournament to the Tab Son Club after-school program that is sponsored by the Ocean City Tabernacle. — News release from the Ocean City Exchange Clublast_img read more

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Study: Hoosiers are lacking proper sleep

first_img WhatsApp Google+ Pinterest Twitter Previous articleMan hospitalized after being shot in abdomen in ElkhartNext articleChanges coming to college campuses in the fall Network Indiana CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews WhatsApp By Network Indiana – June 17, 2020 0 372 Study: Hoosiers are lacking proper sleep Facebook (“Telechron alarm Clock” by Sherry Venegas, CC BY 2.0) STATEWIDE–It’s already difficult for some Hoosiers to sleep and the coronavirus has only made things more difficult, says the founder of BrainTap Technologies, Dr. Patrick Porter.“Research shows if you don’t get enough sleep, you actually function as if you’ve had two or three drinks (of alcohol),” says Porter. “100 years ago, the average person slept 12 hours. In the 80s it went to 8. In the 90s, it went to 7. Now, the average person sleeps 6 hours. That’s half what we used to sleep.”In the United Health Foundation’s 2019 annual report, they found that 42.8% of kids under the age of 15 were getting “insufficient sleep” in Indiana. High school graduates were only slightly better at 40.4%.“That has a lot to do with the screens. Most kids now are attached to their phones. People are keeping up with their social media presence. It’s a whole different reality for kids today than it was even 20 years ago,” says Porter.More than a third of Hoosiers between the age of 45-64 are also experiencing insufficient sleep (39.4%). Many of those Hoosiers are parents who have even more responsibilities since many of them are parents taking care of kids who are home from school.“Tension has been building up in the home. You’re now around the same people every day. We love our families, but sometimes we need a break, even from our families. The little things that might not have bothered us so much because we only saw them occasionally, now they bother us more,” says Porter.The coronavirus has brought about uncertainty in Indiana and across the country.“In psychology, we’d call this the ‘Infinite Now’ because we don’t know when it’s going to end. The brain doesn’t like uncertainty. We need to start thinking more about our future. Luckily, we’re going through these phases. As long as people stay focused and do what’s expected, we should arrive at some new ‘now’ whenever that is,” says Porter.If you are having trouble sleeping, Porter says you need to get your brain to understand that it’s getting close to bedtime.“If you’re the type of person who caffeine effects, then anytime after 2 o’clock in the afternoon, stop all of that caffeine. Even keeping your bedroom cool can help. Your body has to drop in temperature to get you to sleep. The darker your bedroom is, the better,” says Porter.He also recommends not eating anywhere between 2 and 4 hours before you’d like to go to bed. Google+ Pinterest Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Oreos to be produced in UK

first_imgOreo biscuits are being made in the UK for the first time, following the opening last week of a new £6m production line in Sheffield.Owners Mondelēz International said the investment will safeguard 70 jobs at the site, which also produces Trebor, Maynards and Bassetts confectionery.Maurizio Brusadelli, president of the UK and Ireland at Mondelēz International, said the investment indicated the importance of the UK as a manufacturing base. “We know that Britain is a nation of biscuit lovers – it is currently the biggest biscuit market in EU.“In addition, our Sheffield factory is currently the largest sugar confectionery plant in Europe, and our employees here have the manufacturing expertise we need to turn their hands from sweets to biscuits. This investment is a first step – we hope to follow it with further investment and innovation in biscuits.”David Blunkett, MP for Sheffield Brightside and Hillsborough, opened the facility. “I am pleased that Oreos will now be manufactured in Sheffield,” he said. “The additional investment and commitment to training are particularly welcome at a time of such great uncertainty for our economy.”Oreo is the number one biscuit brand in the world, worth £1.3bn globally and £22m in the UK. Sales in the UK are growing 22% year on year, the company said. Later in the year the site will also start to produce BelVita Breakfast Biscuits.last_img read more

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Comic genius

first_img Harvard’s collection of comics is vast and varied. It includes the autobiographical comic “The Realist” by Israeli illustrator and comic book artist Asaf Hanuka, published by Archaia (2015); the action-adventure drone comic “RAV” by Mickey Zacchilli, published by Youth in Decline (2014); and “Comix 2000” by various artists, published by L’Association (1999). Photos by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Harvard’s Lamont Library collections contain a number of comics and graphic novels, including popular items from DC and Marvel Comics. The page above, from “Batgirl/Robin Year One,” was published by DC Comics in 2013. For generations, comics, cartoons, and graphic novels have fueled imaginations with their superheroes from far-off galaxies, helped shape political discourse with their biting critiques, and made readers laugh and cry with their poignant reflections on the human condition.Harvard’s own comic collection is vast and varied and includes wordless woodcut picture stories from the early 20th century, popular strips from D.C. and Marvel, and “The Walking Dead,” the black-and-white series that spawned the megahit TV show. The range of the evocative art form will be front and center during a conversation titled “Visual Storytelling: Comics in the Collections” from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at the Sperry Room at Harvard Divinity School’s Andover Hall. The talk, part of the “Strategic Conversations at Harvard Library” series, will also explore the challenges of collecting and curating comics in an academic setting. Featured speakers are Peter Kuper, a cartoonist, illustrator, and visiting lecturer in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, and Jenny Robb, curator of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum at Ohio State University.In an interview with the Gazette, Kuper, a regular contributor to Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, and Mad magazine, talked about the art, ambition, and importance of comics, along with his recent adaptation of Kafka’s “Metamorphosis,” a project whose original art and ancillary material Houghton Library has acquired with plans to make available for study.GAZETTE: What would you say to those who might think comic books shouldn’t be considered part of a serious university collection?KUPER: These people are mistaken, or simply uninformed on what has taken place in this area of art and literature. I’d like to think there are few people left who maintain this perspective (but as a cartoonist I’ve learned to live with disappointment). The answer is to point them in the direction of the incredible body of work that has been done. Art Spiegelman’s “Maus” is a natural starting point, but there is so much more that has been done since he won a Pulitzer for that book in 1992: Marjane Satrapi’s “Persepolis” (which was also adapted into an Oscar-nominated animated film), Alison Bechdel’s “Fun Home” (which has been adapted into a hit Broadway play), Joe Sacco’s “Footnotes in Gaza,” to name only a few. I’ll be bringing a recommended reading list to my Harvard talk.GAZETTE: What are some of the challenges and barriers faced by those collecting and curating comics in academic settings?KUPER: Cataloging so readers are able to locate the works requires that they are placed in subcategories and not all lumped under the “graphic novel” umbrella. Kafka adaptations should be with other Kafka books — not in humor or jammed in with every other graphic novel, as has been the case with many bookstores and libraries in the past. This may occasionally require buying more than one copy (hint, hint). Comics collections at Harvard If a picture is worth a thousand words, one of Harvard’s comics holdings can speak volumes. The collection “Comix 2000” consists entirely of drawings without text, including this image from an untitled piece by artist Sergio Garcia.center_img A collection of art comics and illustrations from the British independent publishing company Nobrow is part of Harvard’s comics holdings. The image above is from the cover of Nobrow #9, published by Nobrow Press (2014). The eponymous heroine of the British comic “Tank Girl” drives and lives in a tank, and dates a mutant kangaroo named Booga. This page is from “The Cream of Tank Girl” by Jamie Hewlett and Alan Martin, published by Titan Books (2008). GAZETTE: Is there a distinction to be made between comics and graphic novels?KUPER: If there’s a clear distinction (which there really isn’t), it would only be between comic book “floppies,” which are what superhero comic book magazines tend to be, and something packaged in a book format. This line has been intentionally blurred since the term “graphic novel” has gained greater respectability with book buyers, so it’s slapped on any comic that is done in a long form. Libraries have to be as discerning about graphic novels as they are about literature. There is genre material that is geared towards kids and young adults and other literary examples covering politics, autobiography, history, etc., that are aimed at adults. The biggest disservice is to treat comics as one form and isolate it all together.GAZETTE: What is the role of comics and graphic novels in helping shape our culture? And what can they do that other media or art forms can’t?KUPER: We are a very visually literate society and comics only encourage and increase that literacy. Unlike viewing a movie, which is a more passive act, comics create an intimate relationship between artist and audience that is very participatory. A comic requires that the reader make visual connections and follow a story from panel to panel, connecting the dots and deciding what takes place between panels. Comics are a unique language and can even function without words, telling a story through images alone. In this way, they can dismantle language barriers without sacrificing a complex story.GAZETTE: As a political cartoonist, why do you think comics and graphic novels are such an effective tool for political and social commentary?KUPER: One of the beauties of the form is the relationship between image and text. Comics allow the artist to show conflicting/ironic imagery to make a clear point. The caption can say, “They were overjoyed with the news,” while showing an image of crying people. It also can make information more accessible. In “Maus,” to have simple drawings of mice representing the Jews and cats representing Nazis allowed readers to engage with the subject and see themselves in the drawings. It was deceptively light in its visuals and gave readers a way to enter and understand the horrors of the Holocaust and its impact on the author and his subjects.GAZETTE: What inspired you to adapt books such as Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis” and Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” to graphic novels?KUPER: With “The Jungle,” it was opportunity. A publisher was doing a line of “classics illustrated” and gave me a chance to do something longer form and in full color. This was at a time (1990) when bookstores and libraries were not carrying graphic novels. I saw this as a way to demonstrate the possibilities of the form with material that had been important to me growing up and hopefully break through to a non-comic-reading public. It had great limitations since I was adapting a 350-plus-page book into a 48-page graphic novel (the format the publisher had set), but it did reach a wider audience and began the process of opening doors to libraries and bookstores.With “The Metamorphosis,” my adaptation was longer than Kafka’s story. I had previously adapted nine of his short stories in a collection called “Give it Up!” and loved the experience, so “The Metamorphosis” was a natural follow-up. Kafka’s writing acted as an anchor that allowed me to experiment with the art form and really demonstrate ways of storytelling that only could be done in comics. In one passage, in order to follow the text, the reader has to turn the book around 360 degrees, which is in conjunction with visuals following Gregor Samsa as he climbs the walls. I was also able to bring a style to the story that while reflecting German Expressionist art also had a comical quality that brought out the dark humor in Kafka’s writing.last_img read more

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1,980 accepted to the Class of 2024

first_imgRegular-action decisions were sent out Thursday evening to applicants to Harvard College’s Class of 2024, with 1,980 officially admitted. The total number of applications was 40,248.“From their applications it is clear that the Class of 2024 will bring to Harvard extraordinary talents, ideas, backgrounds, and life experiences,” said William R. Fitzsimmons, dean of admissions and financial aid. “We look forward to giving them a preview of what Harvard College has to offer during our Virtual Visitas program and getting to know them over the next four years.”This year’s admitted class hails from every state and from 92 countries. International students make up 10.8 percent of the class, and 8.8 percent are U.S. dual citizens. Twenty-two percent come from Middle Atlantic States, 19.7 percent from the South, 17.4 percent from New England, 16.9 percent from the Western and Mountain States, 11.9 percent from the Midwest, and 12 percent from the U.S territories and abroad.Based on projections, more than half of the class will receive need-based grants, allowing families to pay an average of $12,000 annually. Harvard will require no contribution from nearly 23 percent of the families, representing those with annual incomes below $65,000. The students in this group will also receive $2,000 start-up grants to help with move-in costs and other expenses incurred in making the transition to College.In addition, earlier this month, Harvard announced it would further expand its financial aid program by eliminating from aid awards the summer work expectation beginning in the 2020–21 academic year. Students still will be expected to contribute $3,500 through term-time work to meet their estimated personal expenses. Based on projections, more than half of the Class of 2024 will receive need-based grants, allowing families to pay an average of $12,000 annually. Harvard will require no contribution from nearly 23 percent of the families. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. The Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) is investing an estimated $2 million to fund the program expansion. The goal is to provide aided students with more flexibility to pursue academic, public service, or internship opportunities during the summer. Since launching the Harvard Financial Aid Initiative in 2005, the University has awarded more than $2 billion in grants to undergraduates. Harvard’s budget for the group has increased more than 148 percent, from $80 million in 2005 to more than $200 million in 2019.This year, an estimated 380 admitted students, or about 19 percent, qualified for federal Pell grants, typically awarded to students from lower-income backgrounds, up from 340, or about 17 percent, last year. First-generation students represent 19.4 percent of the class, compared with 16.4 percent in 2019.“The College continues to invest in its core value of providing access to a Harvard education to outstanding students from all economic backgrounds, and we are pleased that our generous, need-based financial aid program is continuing to inspire applicants to apply,” said Jake Kaufmann, Griffin Director of Financial Aid. “Additionally, all aided students now have the added benefit of Harvard’s elimination of the summer work expectation, which we hope allows them to pursue summer internships, research, or public-service opportunities.”At Harvard, families with incomes from $65,000 to $150,000 pay no more than 10 percent of their annual income. Loans are not required of students, and families who make more than $150,000 are generally eligible for aid on a sliding scale, depending on their particular circumstances, such as multiple children in college or unusual medical or other essential expenses.The Class of 2024 reflects the increasing diversity of the College’s applicants, with 14.8 percent identifying as African American/black, 24.5 percent as Asian American, 12.7 percent as Latinx, 1.8 percent as Native American, and 0.4 percent as native Hawaiian. Women account for more than half, 51.6 percent, of all those accepted to the class.In recent years, Harvard has increased its efforts to recruit individuals who have served in the U.S. military, working with groups affiliated with the Defense Department and joining the Service to School’s VetLink program in 2017. Thirteen veterans were admitted to this year’s class, and 47 students expressed interest in ROTC, an increase from six veterans and 41 potential ROTC candidates last year.“We are thrilled that more military veterans are applying to and enrolling in the College than at any time in recent decades,” said Marlyn McGrath, director of admissions.Harvard recently decided to cancel its on-site programming for Visitas, its admitted student weekend, which had been scheduled for April 18‒20. Instead, students are invited to participate in a “Virtual Visitas” the entire month of April. The program will give class members a chance to connect with students, faculty, and leadership online. Members of the Harvard community are encouraged to share videos on social media and use the hashtag #Visitas2020 to welcome next year’s new class.Staff members of the Griffin Financial Aid office will be available to speak with students and their families starting now and through the month of April to help them as they make their final college choices.Students will have until May 1 to reply.last_img read more

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Trade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021

first_imgTrade group says LNG oversupply situation likely to last through 2021 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):LNG developers “need to brace themselves for a continued glut” in world gas markets with rising supplies potentially outpacing demand growth for another two years, the International Gas Union said in an April 27 outlook.“This will mean continued depressed prices,” said the International Gas Union, or IGU. “This is then likely followed by a period of recovery, with renewed uncertainty around the middle of the decade.”The 42.5 million tonnes per annum of worldwide liquefaction capacity that came online in 2019 is expected to extend the oversupply into the mid- to late 2020s, significantly longer than the forecast issued just a year ago by the IGU, which represents all sectors in the gas value chain. If Qatar moves forward with its North Field LNG expansion, which the industry group described as one of the world’s most cost-competitive projects, another 49 mtpa of supply could come online between 2024 and 2027, causing the global glut to last another couple of years.The market was oversupplied even before coronavirus pandemic began hitting world demand, with the global liquefaction capacity reaching about 430.5 mtpa by the end of 2019, the IGU reported. LNG prices slumped as rising supplies, especially from the U.S., met weaker-than-expected demand in a mild winter. But the pandemic made the situation worse as lockdowns imposed by world governments to control the spread of the coronavirus hit commercial and industrial demand for gas.New additions of LNG production capacity in 2020 are expected to reach 24.35 mtpa. In the U.S., new liquefaction units are in the late stages of commissioning at the Freeport LNG Development LP facility in Texas, Kinder Morgan Inc.’s Elba Island LNG plant in Georgia, and the Sempra Energy-led Cameron LNG terminal in Louisiana.“The current market environment lowers the expectations of seeing a recovery in prices any time before the coming winter,” the IGU reported.[Corey Paul]More ($): LNG glut to persist years longer than previously thought, industry group sayslast_img read more

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Bolivia’s Navy Expected to Combat Narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca

first_imgIn 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA). By Dialogo March 09, 2015 However, in recent months Peruvian security forces have made it more difficult for drug trafficking groups to use narco-planes by destroying least 60 clandestine landing strips used by the traffickers, including many in the VRAEM. Citing security reasons, Vice Adm. Calla didn’t reveal where or precisely when the unit would be deployed, but said the unit would be mobile so it could surprise narcotraffickers. “We have detected a lot of activity, not just drug trafficking, but also smuggling on Lake Titicaca, so the Bolivian Navy is establishing a specific unit that will be under the jurisdiction of the Fourth Naval District.” Bolivia has also made progress in the fight against narcotrafficking and drug cultivation. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia by plane before routing the drugs to Central America, North America, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. The announcement occurred just weeks after Bolivia and Peru started working jointly against narcotrafficking and other criminal activities along their shared border. The countries are using a satellite system to detect narcotic shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations, around the clock. The nations’ Navies, Air Forces, and counter-narcotics police forces work together to interdict and search suspicious vessels. In 2012, criminal organizations cultivated more than 60,000 hectares of coca crops in Peru, which is home to 13-coca growing regions. The vast majority of the coca produced in the country – 93 percent – is used to produce illegal drugs with the remaining plants used for traditional consumption and industrial use, according to Peru’s National Commission for a Drug-Free Life (DEVIDA). The Andean nations are continuing to work together on land to combat narcotrafficking and the cultivation of coca – the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Each country’s Military and police forces are concentrating their eradication of coca crop efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and in Peru’s Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. In March, Bolivia’s Navy is expected to launch a special unit to assist Bolivia’s Special Anti-Drug Force (FELCN) in combating narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca, Vice Admiral Waldo Calla, the commander of the Navy, said recently. “We have detected a lot of activity, not just drug trafficking, but also smuggling on Lake Titicaca, so the Bolivian Navy is establishing a specific unit that will be under the jurisdiction of the Fourth Naval District.” The announcement occurred just weeks after Bolivia and Peru started working jointly against narcotrafficking and other criminal activities along their shared border. The countries are using a satellite system to detect narcotic shipments on Lake Titicaca, which straddles both nations, around the clock. The nations’ Navies, Air Forces, and counter-narcotics police forces work together to interdict and search suspicious vessels. Bolivia has also made progress in the fight against narcotrafficking and drug cultivation. However, in recent months Peruvian security forces have made it more difficult for drug trafficking groups to use narco-planes by destroying least 60 clandestine landing strips used by the traffickers, including many in the VRAEM. In March, Bolivia’s Navy is expected to launch a special unit to assist Bolivia’s Special Anti-Drug Force (FELCN) in combating narcotrafficking on Lake Titicaca, Vice Admiral Waldo Calla, the commander of the Navy, said recently. Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares since 2010, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18, 2014. Drug traffickers transport about half of the 450 tons of cocaine produced in Peru annually to Bolivia by plane before routing the drugs to Central America, North America, Brazil, Mexico, Europe, and Asia. The Andean nations are continuing to work together on land to combat narcotrafficking and the cultivation of coca – the main ingredient used to produce cocaine. Each country’s Military and police forces are concentrating their eradication of coca crop efforts in Bolivian border communities such as Apolo and San Fermín, and in Peru’s Apurímac, Ene, and Mantaro Rivers Valley (VRAEM) region. Citing security reasons, Vice Adm. Calla didn’t reveal where or precisely when the unit would be deployed, but said the unit would be mobile so it could surprise narcotraffickers. Since 2010, Bolivia has reduced the number of hectares used to cultivate illegal coca from 34,500 hectares to 23,200 hectares since 2010, according to a press release from the Vice Ministry of Social Defense on November 18, 2014.last_img read more

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