How I’d invest £100k in this FTSE 100 stock market crash to make a million

first_img See all posts by Peter Stephens Enter Your Email Address Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Investing £100k in FTSE 100 shares today may seem a risky way to try to make a million. After all, the stock market crash may not yet be over. High levels of volatility could lead to paper losses in the short run, which may be severe in some cases.However, valuations across the FTSE 100 suggest that now could be the right time to buy stocks. Their recovery prospects and track records of enjoying bull markets after bear markets are proven. That may mean investing £100k, or any other amount, in high-quality businesses could increase your chances of generating a seven-figure portfolio in the long run.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Fair valuationsThe FTSE 100’s decline means that the index is trading at the same level as it did over 20 years ago. As such, many of its members are trading on valuations not seen since the last bear market in 2009. In some cases, FTSE 100 shares are even cheaper than they were back then.However, the key focus for investors should be on paying a fair price for a business instead of a low price. In other words, the economic outlook over the coming months could be very challenging. Some stocks may not survive, or may need government help to do so. This means choosing stocks that have financial strength is key. Think low debt levels and solid free cash flow that can help them overcome short-term challenges.Those companies that are more likely to survive the upcoming economic difficulties may not be the cheapest in the FTSE 100. But they could be the best value. Their current prices may reflect a risky outlook that they are ultimately likely to overcome. Focusing your capital on them may mean you get a relatively attractive risk/reward ratio compared to buying ultra-cheap-but-high-risk stocks.Economic moatsOne aspect of businesses that investors may wish to consider when purchasing stocks is their economic moats. For example, they may have a high degree of customer loyalty, unique products or lower costs than their peers. A wide economic moat may not necessarily protect a business from economic difficulties in the short run. But it may enable them to fully capitalise on the likely economic recovery in the coming years.Governments and central banks are pumping billions into the economy, and potentially going further in this regard in the coming months. So many FTSE 100 stocks could offer recovery potential. After the financial crisis, many large-cap shares went on to post high returns. Among those businesses most likely to partake in a recovery could be those with competitive advantages. As such, they may be the most attractive investing opportunities at the present time.Making a millionClearly, investing £100k, or any other amount, in FTSE 100 shares today is unlikely to yield a high return in the short run due to the risks facing the economy.However, the FTSE 100’s total returns since inception (around 8% per annum) mean that even if the index performs as it has done in the past, it would take around 30 years to make a million from a £100k investment. Through buying high-quality businesses with wide economic moats at fair prices, though, you could reduce the amount of time it takes to make a million. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Image source: Getty Images. How I’d invest £100k in this FTSE 100 stock market crash to make a million Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge!center_img I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Peter Stephens has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Peter Stephens | Saturday, 4th April, 2020 | More on: ^FTSE Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.last_img read more

Read More »

The Fevertree share price. Is it time to buy in?

first_img “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I’ve always held a strong admiration for Fevertree Drinks (LSE: FVER). Founded by Charles Rolls and Tim Warriner in 2004, the company tapped into a hitherto unfulfilled market segment for premium mixers. It floated on the AIM in 2014 at 134p per share. The Fevertree share price touched highs of over £41 in 2018, an astonishing rate of return for initial investors.The Fevertree success storyDuring the last decade, Fevertree smashed analysts’ forecasts time and time again. A strong product and branding provided the basis for success. Coupled with huge growth in the UK craft spirits market, the company was in the right place at the right time to enjoy huge sales.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Since the highs of 2018, the Fevertree share price has fallen back to around the £24 mark. Why is this, and should investors be braced for a rocky ride? In 2019 Fevertee posted growth of 9.7%. In almost any scenario this would make for happy investors, but the track record since float shows this as comparatively poor performance.Fevertree – pandemic problemsFirst-half revenue was down 11% due to the impact of on-trade sales. Bars and restaurants account for 45% of sales, so due to lower revenues and higher costs, Fevertree suffered a 35% fall in profits. Paul Summers looked at this in detail earlier this year.The dividend was slightly increased to 5.41p, but as this is only a yield of around 0.7%, even reinvesting these dividends would not contribute hugely to investment growth. Potential investors must focus on the case for future sales increases as a reason to purchase the stock.The future for the Fevertree share priceEven before the Covid-19 pandemic, sales in the UK had begun to fall. It is wise to consider if this is due to the boom period for craft spirits coming to an end. There is a limit to how much Fevertree can sell in the UK, and the data shows that rapid growth is over.Fevertree must therefore focus on international expansion to grow sales. The US would be the logical market to focus on, but differentials in customer tastes make the situation more complex. The prevalence of dark spirits such as bourbon or rum in the US mean that Fevertree’s portfolio there will depend on products such as cola, rather than tonic water. This market is more crowded and will be difficult to penetrate.Fevertree share price – an investment caseIn my opinion, Fevertree has all the hallmarks of a sound investment case. Founder Tim Warrilow still remains as CEO. This gives good stability and continuity of vision. Businesses such as Superdry have demonstrated in recent years that removing this aspect (in their case, ongoing battles over the role of Julian Dunkerton) has negative impacts on investor confidence.Fevertree have also demonstrated sound growth in sales, profits, and earnings per share, with dividend increases to boot.And yet, I won’t be buying in. The price-to-earnings ratio currently sits at 50. Investors in this case are insatiable. Success is expected to be followed with more success. That demand becomes reflected in a very steep asking price. As a general rule of thumb, I like my investments to have a P/E ratio no greater than 20. I still believe Fevertree to be a sound long-term prospect, but would like to see the current price come down before investing. Enter Your Email Address I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. bwatson1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Fevertree Drinks. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Ben Watson | Monday, 14th December, 2020 | More on: FEVR center_img The Fevertree share price. Is it time to buy in? Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Image source: Getty Images. See all posts by Ben Watsonlast_img read more

Read More »

Smaller charities hardest hit by funding cuts since 2008

first_img  215 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis45 Tagged with: Funding research small charities Smaller charities hardest hit by funding cuts since 2008 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis45 Melanie May | 11 February 2016 | News Small and medium-sized charities (with an income between £25,000 and £1m) have been hardest hit by cuts to public funding of the voluntary sector since 2008, according to two new reports by NCVO and IPPR North, and funded by Lloyds Bank Foundation.By 2013, one quarter of charities with an income between £100k-£500k had moved into a lower income band, while over 23,000 charities stopped operating between 2008 and 2013: the majority with an income under £500k.% change in income from central and local government: 2008/09 – 2012/13The research shows that funding from local and central government for small and medium sized charities reduced by up to 44% between 2008/09 and 2012/13, accounting for a higher proportion of income than for that of larger organisations. Government funding has instead shifted towards more competitive commissioning and contracting models which have allowed larger charities and organisations to dominate the market.Despite increasing income from individuals by up to 21%, the research shows that this has not been enough to offset losses of government income of up to 38%, resulting in an overall shortfall. Survival tactics have included mergers, takeovers, diversifying income sources, increased partnerships, reducing costs and ultimately services. Charities in the £100,000 to £500,000 income bracket, for example, nearly halved the proportion of their spending on staff costs, making them more reliant on volunteers.The research also showed that the combination of cuts and changes to how funding is distributed is reflected in volatility in charity finances, with half of smaller charities experiencing an income fluctuation of at least one fifth, often due to a reliance on a single grant or contract.Nationwide, small and medium-sized charities in the North East, North West and West Midlands have lost the highest proportion overall. Income declined for every sector, with legal services, social services and health seeing particularly large reductions. Those most likely to have been affected are smaller charities working in deprived neighbourhoods, as well as those working with black and minority ethnic communities.% change in overall income by region for charities with income between £25k and £1m: 2008/09 – 2012/13Karl Wilding, director of public policy at NCVO, said:“We know public service markets are skewed in a way that means they suit big businesses far better than smaller charities. Short time scales, growing contract sizes and inappropriate transfer of risk all put charities on the back foot in public service provision. This is showing through now in these results, with only the very largest charities having been able to manage in this environment. Such poor commissioning practice means that the expertise of specialist, local charities is being lost to public services.”Lloyds Bank Foundation is calling for urgent action led by central Government to help small and medium-sized charities, including the reforming public commissioning to ensure resources reach small and medium-sized charities, calling on funders to take steps to reduce the volatility of small and medium sized charities’ income, and to support charities to enable them to build their capacity.Paul Streets, chief executive of Lloyds Bank Foundation for England and Wales said: Advertisement  214 total views,  1 views today “Whilst a few larger charities have prospered, many small and medium-sized charities have been forced to close and others are fighting hard for survival. With the long-term squeeze continuing on local government funding, the Government must heed the warnings in this research and act to reform how it funds and commissions otherwise we will all wake up one day and be shocked at what we have lost.”Read Lloyds Bank Foundation’s executive summary of the research here. About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

Read More »

Leesa Harwood announces departure from RNLI

first_img Leesa Harwood, RNLI Director of Lifesaving and Fundraising, has announced that she is leaving the charity.Harwood’s departure comes after nine years at the RNLI, where she led the organisation’s move to opt-in communications and oversaw the merging of the operational and fundraising teams.Leesa said:“My time here has been rewarding, humbling and fulfilling. It has been an absolute privilege to work with such an incredible team of staff and volunteers here at the RNLI and to have been able to add value to this very special charity. Now though, commitments outside work mean that I can no longer give the time and energy that this role demands and after nine years at the RNLI it is time to move on.”Paul Boissier, RNLI Chief Executive, said: Advertisement Leesa Harwood announces departure from RNLI Tagged with: Charity People Recruitment / people About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. “I would like to thank Leesa for her commitment and the leadership she has shown over the last nine years.  She has been instrumental in some brave decisions that have set us up for success in the 21st century.”Harwood will continue her role until October 2018 when she will leave to concentrate other interests.The RNLI was the first major charity to adopt an opt-in approach to its communications back in January 2017. It announced this February that 500,000 of its supporters had opted in. Melanie May | 27 April 2018 | News  108 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 Image credit: Nathan Williams  107 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis7 read more

Read More »

Journalism in Valle del Cauca – terror, economic pressure and self-censorship

first_img April 27, 2021 Find out more May 7, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalism in Valle del Cauca – terror, economic pressure and self-censorship Related documents informacio_n_entre_el_terror_y_el_centavo_ok-3.pdfPDF – 966.32 KB Help by sharing this information October 21, 2020 Find out more ColombiaAmericas RSF and FECOLPER have registered two murders of journalists and one attempted murder in Colombia since the start of the year, confirming the country’s status as one of the most dangerous in the western hemisphere for media personnel.After Edgar Quintero, a journalist with local Radio Luna, was murdered in Palmira, a city in Valle del Cauca, on 2 March, the two NGOs decided to carry out a joint visit to the department to document the challenges facing journalists there.They visited the cities of Buenaventura and Palmira from 13 to 15 March, meeting local government officials, more than 50 journalists, representatives of two journalists’ organizations and civil society representatives.“There is no getting away from it – journalists in Valle del Cauca face brutal violence by paramilitary and guerrilla groups as well as stifling economic pressure,” said Claire San Filippo, the head of RSF’s Americas desk.“Some are reduced to censoring themselves for fear of reprisals, while others are forced to move to a different location. Without independent, impartial and thorough investigations into the threats and violence against them, and without an effective and coordinated policy of protection, Colombian journalists will continue to work in fear.”A total of 29 journalists have been killed in Valle del Cauca since 1980, including 12 in Cali (the departmental capital), five in Cartago and four in Buenaventura.“We censor ourselves because they kill or ‘make you disappear’,” said Adriana Minota of Radio Voz del Pacífico. “Even if there are now fewer murders, you hear of more and more people going missing. The criminals know when you are going to cover certain stories. Some control you by means of fear. When you know what happened to other threatened journalists, you obviously worry.”As well as the violence, freedom of information is significantly limited by the conditions placed on state advertising. The lack of regulation and fairness in its distribution continues to be a problem. The authorities continue to use the allocation of advertising as lever for favouring or punishing media according to their editorial policies.“People in high places call us to tell us what they liked and didn’t like,” said Adriana Restrepo Valencia, a journalist with online TV station Palmitveo Colombia. “If you’re a journalist, you cannot work without being subjected to pressure in Palmira.” ColombiaAmericas Colombia is ranked 128th out of 180 countries in the press freedom index that Reporters Without Borders released in February. 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies RSF_en Organisation RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin Americacenter_img Terrorized and pressured economically, journalists censor themselves in the southwestern department of Valle del Cauca, according to a joint report on freedom of information in this region that Reporters Without Borders (RSF) and the Colombian Federation of Journalists (FECOLPER) released today. Receive email alerts Reports News News May 13, 2021 Find out more to go further Read the full report here Follow the news on Colombia News RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombialast_img read more

Read More »

Police in Myanmar crack down on crowds defying protest ban

first_imgLocal NewsWorld News Police in Myanmar crack down on crowds defying protest ban Facebook Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 9, 2021 Pinterest Twitter TAGS  center_img Facebook Twitter Protesters sitting on a road blocked by police in riot gear flash the three-fingered salute, a symbol of resistance, during a protest in Mandalay, Myanmar, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021. Protesters continued to gather Tuesday morning in major cities breaching Myanmar’s new military rulers ban of public gathering of five or more issued on Monday intended to crack down on peaceful public protests opposing their takeover. WhatsApp WhatsApp Previous articleAvaya Reports First Quarter Fiscal 2021 Financial ResultsNext articleThe Latest: Tsitsipas routs Simon to reach 2nd round Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Read More »

Sod turning at site of long awaited Twin Towns swimming pool

first_img WhatsApp Google+ NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny Pinterest Facebook Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Twitter Newsx Adverts Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – February 9, 2012 center_img Google+ 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today Twitter Previous articleGAA – Partial Reprieve For Derrytresk Ahead Of Croke Park FinalNext articleSF hit out at other parties on Donegal County Council News Highland Pinterest Sod turning at site of long awaited Twin Towns swimming pool WhatsApp Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson The first sod is being turned this afternoon at the site of the long awaited Twin Towns swimming pool.Junior Tourism and Sports Minister Michael Ring is turning the sod at the Finn Valley Leisure Centre site.He’ll also visit the site of the new Finn Harps Football Club Stadium.Later this afternoon, Minister Ring will carry out functions in Convoy, Fintown, Ballyshannon and Bundoran. Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector publishedlast_img read more

Read More »

500k allocated for Donegal Roads under CIS scheme

first_imgNews 500k allocated for Donegal Roads under CIS scheme Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Twitter Twitter Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic center_img 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ By News Highland – May 20, 2013 Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Rural roads are to be given a facelift thanks to a 10.6 million euro investment from the Department of Transport.Under the scheme maintenance works will be carried out at 377 locations – or to over 240 kilometres of road,  over the next two years.Almost 500 hundred thousand euro will be spent in Donegal with the estimated value of community work at 127 thousand euro.The Junior Transport Minister Alan Kelly says local authorities have asked communities to come up with a portion of the cost of the scheme, allowing communities have a direct input along with their local authority into local road maintenance.The biggest project in Donegal is on the Maghegallon Road in Derrybeg. The total cost is 210 thousand euro with the value of work to be carried out by the community at 40 thousand.85 thousand euro will be spent on the Pier Road, Magherroarty with the value of community work at 35 thousand 500 euro.50 thousand euro is being spent on the Moyle Road Milford with community work estimated at 15 thousand euro.There are smaller projects at Pier Road, Rathmullan, Killea Road Kilmacrennan, Ashdown Brae and the Rushfield Road in Carrigans. Previous articleGovernment reimburses Donegal County Council for reaching household charge targetsNext article“Ireland shouldn’t pull out of Eurovision” – Dolan News Highland Pinterest Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Facebooklast_img read more

Read More »

Punishment Of Dismissal From Service Is Not Disproportionate To ‘Corrupt’ Employee: SC [Read Judgment]

first_imgTop StoriesPunishment Of Dismissal From Service Is Not Disproportionate To ‘Corrupt’ Employee: SC [Read Judgment] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK10 Sep 2020 8:15 AMShare This – xThe punishment of dismissal is not disproportionate to corrupt employee, observed the Supreme Court while dismissing the appeal of a CISF officer dismissed from service for indulging in corruption.The bench comprising Justices NV Ramana, S. Abdul Nazeer and Surya Kant observed that charges such as corruption, misappropriation and gross indiscipline are grave and ought to be dealt…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe punishment of dismissal is not disproportionate to corrupt employee, observed the Supreme Court while dismissing the appeal of a CISF officer dismissed from service for indulging in corruption.The bench comprising Justices NV Ramana, S. Abdul Nazeer and Surya Kant observed that charges such as corruption, misappropriation and gross indiscipline are grave and ought to be dealt with strictly. Pravin Kumar, joined the Central Industrial Security Force in January, 1995 as a Sub­-Inspector. Later he was posted in  Crime and Intelligence Wing and was specifically entrusted with conducting surprise searches of personnel and taking strict action against anyone indulging in corruption. He was later dismissed from service after conducting a disciplinary inquiry in which the charges of corruption and extra-constitutional conduct were found proved. The Bombay High Court dismissed his writ petition challenging the disciplinary inquiry. Employer always retains the right to conduct an independent disciplinary proceeding, irrespective of the outcome of a criminal proceeding. In this case, the authorities, in addition to appointment of enquiry officer, registered a criminal complaint with the CBI. After investigation, the CBI did not find adequate material to launch criminal prosecution. The contention raised by the delinquent employee was that he should be exonerated in disciplinary proceedings as no criminal charge sheet was filed by the CBI after enquiry. Rejecting the said submission, the bench observed that the employer always retains the right to conduct an independent disciplinary proceeding, irrespective of the outcome of a criminal proceeding.   It is beyond debate that criminal proceedings are distinct from civil proceedings. It is both possible and common in disciplinary matters to establish charges against a delinquent official by preponderance of probabilities and consequently terminate his services. But the same set of evidence may not be sufficient to take away his liberty under our criminal law jurisprudence.Such distinction between standards of proof amongst civil and criminal litigation is deliberate, given the differences in stakes, the power imbalance between the parties and the social costs of an erroneous decision. Thus, in a disciplinary enquiry, strict rules of evidence and procedure of a criminal trial are inapplicable, like say, statements made before enquiry officers can be relied upon in certain instances Scope of Judicial Review in Service Matters.The court also explained the scope of Judicial Review in Service Matters. It said that the power of judicial review discharged by Constitutional Courts under Article 226 or 32, or when sitting in appeal under Article 136, is distinct from the appellate power exercised by a departmental appellate authority.”It would be gainsaid that judicial review is an evaluation of the decision­making process, and not the merits of the decision itself. Judicial Review seeks to ensure fairness in treatment and not fairness of conclusion. It ought to be used to correct manifest errors of law or procedure, which might result in significant injustice; or in case of bias or gross unreasonableness of outcome. It is thus well settled that the Constitutional Courts while exercising their powers of judicial review would not assume the role of an appellate authority. Their jurisdiction is circumscribed by limits of correcting errors of law, procedural errors leading to manifest injustice or violation of principles of natural justice. Put differently, judicial review is not analogous to venturing into the merits of a case like an appellate authority.”Punishment of dismissal was not disproportionate to the allegation of corruptionThe Court also dismissed the plea that the punishment of dismissal was disproportionate to the allegation of corruption. It said that the Disciplinary Authority has wide discretion in imposing punishment for a proved delinquency, subject to principles of proportionality and fair play.”Such requirements emanate from Article 14 itself, which prohibits State authorities from treating varying­ degrees of misdeeds with the same broad stroke. Determination of such proportionality is a function of not only the action or intention of the delinquent, but must also factor the financial effect and societal implication of such misconduct. But unlike in criminal cases, in matters of disciplinary proceedings Courts only interfere on grounds of proportionality when they find that the punishment awarded is inordinate to a high degree, or if the conscience of the Court itself is shocked. Thus, whereas imposition of major penalty (like dismissal, removal, or reduction in rank) would be discriminatory and impermissible for trivial misdeeds; but for grave offences there is a need to send a clear message of deterrence to the society. Charges such as corruption, misappropriation and gross indiscipline are prime examples of the latter category, and ought to be dealt with strictly. The Court added that the  punishment of dismissal from service is far from disproportionate to the charges of corruption, fabrication and intimidation which have unanimously been proven against the delinquent officer. The Court said:Taking any other view would be an anathema to service jurisprudence. If we were to hold that systematic corruption and its blatant cover­up are inadequate to attract dismissal from service, then the purpose behind having such major penalties, which are explicitly provided for under Article 311 of the Constitution, would be obliterated. Still further, the appellant’s actions would most probably have caused huge consequential losses to BPCL and lowered the reputation of the CISF amongst members of the public. Given the paramilitary nature of the appellant’s force, a sense of integrity, commitment, discipline, and camaraderie is paramount. This expectation is only heightened in the case of the appellant given how he was specifically tasked with weeding out corruption and conducting surprise raids. Once shattered through acts of intimidation, forgery, and corruption; only the severest penalty ought to be imposed.”Case name: Pravin Kumar vs. Union of India Case no.: CIVIL APPEAL NO. 6270 of 2012  Coram: Justices NV Ramana, S. Abdul Nazeer and Surya Kant Click here to Read/Download JudgmentRead JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

Read More »

Supreme Court Stops Bengal Police From Taking Coercive Action Against 5 BJP Leaders On Criminal Cases Registered Against Them

first_imgTop StoriesSupreme Court Stops Bengal Police From Taking Coercive Action Against 5 BJP Leaders On Criminal Cases Registered Against Them LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK18 Dec 2020 12:50 AMShare This – xThe Supreme Court on Friday issued notices on petitions filed by five BJP leaders Arjun Singh, Kailash Vijayvargiya, Pawan Singh, Sourav Singh and Mukul Roy seeking investigation by an independent agency in the criminal cases registered against them by the West Bengal police.A bench headed by Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul also ordered that no coercive action should be taken against the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court on Friday issued notices on petitions filed by five BJP leaders Arjun Singh, Kailash Vijayvargiya, Pawan Singh, Sourav Singh and Mukul Roy seeking investigation by an independent agency in the criminal cases registered against them by the West Bengal police.A bench headed by Justice Sanjay Kishan Kaul also ordered that no coercive action should be taken against the petitioners on the criminal cases till the next date of hearing.Senior Advocate Mukul Rohatgi, appearing for Arjun Singh, MP from Barrackpore constituency, submitted that the criminal cases were “falsely foisted” on his client after he left the Trinamool Congress to join the Bharatiya Janata Party.Advocate  Prashant Kumar, appearing for Kailash Vijayvargia, submitted that cases for minor offences have been registered so that he will not be able to travel in the state ahead of the assembly polls scheduled next year.   Other petitioners also argued that the cases against them were “politically motivated”.The bench also considered another petition filed by Kabir Shankar Bose, who alleged that he was assaulted and attacked while travelling in Bengal.Senior Advocate Mahesh Jethmalani, appearing for Bose, submitted that his client was attacked despite having a protection by CISF(SSG).”I am a person with CISF(SSG) protection which is granted only after IB inputs of threat. I have been attacked and assaulted. I was attacked in the face of CISF(SSG) protection” Jethmalani submitted.After the attack, the Bengal police slapped a criminal case against Bose, he added. He urged the bench to call for the report filed by the CISF(SSG) with respect to the incident and to protect him from coercive action by the police on the case.The bench, also comprising Justices Dinesh Maheshwari and Hrishikesh Roy, directed the CISF(SSG) to place before the court the special incident report in a sealed cover.Click Here To Download Petition[Read Petition]Next Storylast_img read more

Read More »