Lettuce Carves Their Impressive Legacy Onto “Mt. Crushmore” [Stream/Review]

first_imgHot on the heels of their most recent release, Crush, funk futurists Lettuce return with Mt. Crushmore, a collection of tracks that are easily some of the finest they have produced. Though a majority of the material on their new EP is from the Crush sessions, that speaks more to the amazing quality of that album than it does to the strength of the material here. In fact, with a focus on their spacier and more open and experimental facets, this will quickly become one of the most beloved parts of the band’s already impressive catalog.Listen to the new EP below, and read on for our take on the new release.A majestic, time dilated hook from The Shady Horns provides a regal introduction to the amazing space jam on title track “Mt. Crushmore.” The pulsating, stutter start beat from drummer Adam Deitch is all modern, but the lush instrumentation that surrounds it is pure timeless soul and funk. Simultaneously evoking the spirit of badly dubbed martial arts films and the fiercest dance floors, this disc seems a natural source of tunes for future film makers to mine for super fly sound track fodder.Starting off their EP with what is easily the band’s most pure distillation of their disparate discography is a bold statement about the quality of the material being presented here. On “116th St.”, they show how adept they are at working together. The rhythm section and the melodic side share the duties of driving the musical narrative forward down a slinky, sassy road. A break out solo from Eric “Benny” Bloom sees him skip along the ever speeding melody, neither wanting or needing for a slower pace to shine.That mix of skill and attitude is reflective of the entirety of the player in the Lettuce squad. After the long running “Lude” returns for installment number five, Lettuce plays a game of follow the leader on “Elephant Walk.” Marrying the guitar and organ while using them to double the bass and drums allows the organ and horns to explode from their respective prisons. The use of drama generates lush waves of warm and enveloping madness that sweeps all the world’s cares away.“Ransome” shows the band capable of a slightly sinister side in an ominous opening before getting down to the organ driven boogie that is at the heart of the piece. Guitarists Adam Smirnoff and Eric Krasno turn in a series of performances that, when looked at as part of the body of work that also produced the full length Crush album, have to be taken as some of the finest work in the funk field. The spacier solo work contrasts so perfectly with the sped up rhythm strumming on “Ransome” that this should serve as a text book example of how players can compliment each other and still truly speak in their own musical voice.The penultimate track is also the first single from Mt. Crushmore, “The Love You Left Behind,” and features guest vocalist and frequent collaborator Alecia Chakour in a sultry and stunning display of instant connection. That instant rapport makes her call for embracing the love around you afar more urgent and personal message, a word to the wise from an old and trusted friend. The only negative of the album is realizing that the band most known for their instrumentals could also be producing stellar work like this. Check out the track HERE.Finally, to close out the album, the “Interlude” we have been getting peeks at for some time now is given a bit over a minute to further worm itself into our collective musical subconscious.The real take away from Mt. Crushmore is just how much Earth shattering music Lettuce is creating right now. Even though this album just dropped, another trip into the studio would do us all a world of good. They owe it to themselves and fans of music all around the world to see just how far they can go and how down and dirty their funk can get.Don’t miss Lettuce tonight and tomorrow night at the PlayStation Theater in New York, NY, performing with support from The Floozies and Red Baraat. More information can be found here.last_img read more

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Fromm Players at Harvard with Ensemble Dal Niente

first_imgThe Fromm Players at Harvard presents its annual two-concert series of new music works February 28 and March 1 at 8 p.m. in John Knowles Paine Concert Hall. This year’s performances, titled “The natural | The artificial,” feature Dal Niente, a 20-member Chicago-based contemporary music collective, who will present two world premieres and two U.S. premieres among the 10 works programmed.Premieres
Wolf Edwards’s the road from Mutlaa to Basra (1991) makes its world premiere on Friday night’s concert (2/28). The piece found its genesis in a 1991 U.S. plane strike that immobilized a convoy on its way from Kuwait to Iraq, then bombed and strafed the resulting traffic jam for hours. On Saturday’s program, Dal Niente will perform the world premiere of Harvard composer Hans Tutschku’s Still Air 3 and two U.S. premieres: Ming Tsao’s The Book of Virtual Transcriptions, and Marianthi Papalexandri’s Yarn, both of which alter the sound of traditional instruments. Works by contemporary composers Erin Gee, Rick Burkhardt, Evan Johnson, Carola Bauckholt, Enno Poppe, and Harvard alumnus Aaron Einbond will also be performed.Ensemble Dal Niente is a 20-member Chicago-based contemporary music collective that presents and performs new music. Described as “super-musicians” and noted for “bracing sonic adventures by some of the best new-music virtuosos around” (Chicago Tribune), Ensemble Dal Niente became the first-ever ensemble recipient of the coveted Kranichstein Music Prize – the top award for music interpretation – at the 2012 International Summer Courses for New Music in Darmstadt, Germany.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s to host first annual National Literary Festival honoring Sister Madeleva Wolff

first_imgSister Madeleva Wolff, the third president of Saint Mary’s, was known as the “lady abbess of nun poets,” and often invited artists and authors to campus. Saint Mary’s will continue this tradition with the first annual National Literary Festival, hosted by bestselling author and Saint Mary’s alumna Adriana Trigiani (‘81), beginning Friday.“This event honors former Saint Mary’s College president Sister M. Madeleva Wolff, and her bestselling memoir, ‘My First Seventy Years,’” Trigiani said in a press release. “She was a visionary who brought the great artists of her time to our campus. Luminaries including Helen Hayes, Clare Boothe Luce, Irene Dunne, Jean Charlot, Norman LaLiberte, Walter Kerr and Maria Augusta Trapp came to campus, created art, performed and inspired the students.”Continuing the celebration of the College’s 175th anniversary, in addition to Trigiani, the festival will host ten bestselling authors, poets and artists, according to the release. Interim Saint Mary’s President Nancy Nekvasil said the goal of the literary festival is not only to bring the arts to Saint Mary’s students, but to engage with the local community in general.“We have a very, very strong humanities program here, with the different areas in the arts, you know, from the art Fine Arts all the way through our English and humanistic studies,” Nekvasil said. “And so I think it’s really important for us to honor Sister Madeleva in a way of maintaining that as a outward facing activity that we do with the community.”Nekvasil said she sees the festival as an opportunity for Saint Mary’s to interact with the tri-campus community and beyond, and invite others to celebrate the 175th anniversary of the College’s founding in 1844.“I think sometimes we stay a little bit more isolated than we should as a community,” Nekvasil said. “You know, everybody’s busy and has a lot to do, and the students are busy and faculty are busy, staff, administrators, everybody is busy. But we have a lot to offer this community. And so not only our beautiful facilities … but also just what we have here from an intellectual standpoint, and again, as part of the 175th bringing other people into that celebration, I think is really important.”As a former biology professor, Nekvasil said she has always encouraged more women to enter the STEM fields. Saint Mary’s as an institution, however, challenges its students to educate the “whole person,” she said, through its multi-disciplinary Sophia Program.“I come out of the sciences — I come out of biology, and there is a huge push across the nation for women in STEM,” she said. “And I don’t disagree with that. I think it’s absolutely essential. I think that’s a world where men have pretty much dominated and so it’s really important for women to move into there. But what we offer at Saint Mary’s is broader than that. And so even our STEM women are taking courses in English and having to learn to write and to communicate. And so part of it is that for me, that is the whole of the person, if we continue to engage in the liberal arts and, and celebrating that on campus, and not to become siloed in particular disciplines.”Students from all academic concentrations can benefit from studying and celebrating the arts, Nekvasil said.“To me, the arts really cover everything,” she said. “You would be a very poor physician if your mindset or intellect was only in the sciences. You are a much better physician if you can relate to all of your patients and part of that means, you know, understanding the arts, being able to read, being able to appreciate, you know, literature and all of that.”Sister Madeleva, whose broad worldview inspired the community-oriented spirit embodied by the festival, Nekvasil said, was a big proponent of the arts.“Sister Madeleva, interestingly, knew lots and lots of people,” Nekvasil said. “She was a friend of presidents and all these people. And so she was really this … kind of this outward facing representative of Saint Mary’s to the world, and in her love of and her own authorship of poetry and writing, and things like that, I think really reached out to say to people that that is an important aspect of your own personal development. In just thinking about creativity and appreciation of what God has put in front of us to appreciate in that you develop as a whole person when you can stretch that part of you no matter what your personal preferences is in terms of what you want to learn.”Author Adriana Trigiani, who will host the festival, was the first to suggest that Saint Mary’s revitalize Sister Madeleva’s tradition of inviting artists and authors to campus, Nekvasil said.“This really started when Shari Rodriguez, our vice president of college relations, and I visited Adri in her home in New York,” she said. “We were sitting around the living room and just talking about authorship and [Trigiani] having students come and do internships for her and the benefit of that and that’s then where this idea was born.”Trigiani selected and invited the writers to attend the festival, Nekvasil said, and planned to host the event around their individual book releases.“We wanted to do it before Christmas as a way to also encourage people maybe to think about getting books for friends and relatives for Christmas,” Nekvasil said.Nekvasil said Trigiani’s experience in the literary world made her the perfect person to host the College’s inaugural festival. As a co-founder of The Origin Project, Trigiani mentors middle school students living in the Appalachian region of the U.S. According to her website, the program began in 2014 with 40 students, and now serves more than 1,600 students from 17 schools.Through The Origin Project, the students write journal entries throughout the school year, and later publish their work in an anthology, Nekvasil said.“So she’s really the ideal person to do this because she not only writes and, of course, has made her living as an author, but she deeply believes in helping others to learn to write,” Nekvasil said. “Not everybody’s going to be a polished writer, a published writer, but everybody can write their own story. Everybody can learn how to express the things that they’re feeling or thinking on paper in their own way. And so I just think she’s the ideal one, really, to help us get [the festival] off the ground because of her love of encouraging and helping, in this case, kids that have very, very little exposure to books or even being told that they can write.”Two of the festival’s artists are alumnae of the College, including Trigiani (’81) and author and professor Anna Monardo (’77). Nekvasil said it’s important that current students meet alumnae who have found success after graduating from Saint Mary’s, who can serve as a source of encouragement and inspiration.“We have alumnae who are Congresswomen, we have alumnae who are authors, we have alumnae who rescue people off Mount Everest when there’s an avalanche,” she said. “It’s possible. And so I think it helps them just to see possibility in their own lives for what, what they can achieve, and that nothing should hold them back.”Located in such close proximity to Notre Dame, a much larger research institution, Saint Mary’s can sometimes be overshadowed, Nekvasil said.“I think it’s really important for us to have something that is our very own that we do,” Nekvasil said. “You know, we have our own published authors, from the faculty, from the staff. We have alums that have published a variety of different kinds of books and I think it’s just so important for us to say that, first of all, we value it. We value the heritage that we have through Sister Madeleva and others who have been prolific writers and lovers of the arts. It’s taken a lot of people many, many hours to put this together. And it’s just a testament to the love that we have for our alumnae, for what Sister Madeleva started long ago, to honor her, and I just think it’s really important that we do this.”A Monday report stated that nine bestselling authors will be attending the Saint Mary’s College National Literary Festival. In addition to Trigiani, there will be ten authors present. The Observer regrets this error.Tags: Adriana Trigiani, Alumnae, Interim President Nancy Nekvasil, literary festival, national literary festival, Sister Madeleva Wolfflast_img read more

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How credit scoring works

first_img This post is currently collecting data… What your credit scores mean Knowing the basics about credit scores and reporting will help you develop smart credit habits and make effective decisions for your financial future. Over time, these good credit habits and decisions should have a positive impact on your credit score. Healthy credit will help you participate more fully in the modern economy and enable you to take advantage of the credit opportunities you desire. 5SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This is placeholder text continue reading » Credit scoresCredit scores are calculated using information in your credit report. That information is added to your report when companies, such as lenders, banks and utility companies, report your account information to the credit reporting agencies. Scoring models then use categories of information in your reports to calculate a three digit score. Popular scoring models provide credit scores ranging from 300 to 850. Your credit score provides a snapshot of your credit health to lenders, which can help them make a lending decision. Companies may have different criteria for extending credit, so a score that may get you approved with one lender may not be the same for another. In general, the higher your score, the more likely you’ll be approved and get better terms on credit products, which can save you money over time. In some instances, like mortgages, your credit score may not be the only thing lenders look at before offering you credit.last_img read more

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Your 3D Mask customizable face mask has a personalized thermoformed shape » Gadget Flow

first_imgYou know it’s important to wear your face mask out in public, but is it actually doing its job? Not if there are gaps where it should touch your face, it’s not. That’s why Your 3D Mask customizable face mask is such an innovative, useful gadget. Custom thermoformed, this 3D face mask is modeled to fit your unique face. So it ensures there’s a great seal, as there should be. Plus, this lightweight personalized face mask is also comfortable to wear, and it covers your whole face. Made of an extremely durable, unabsorbent material, this customizable face mask is easy to clean when you’re done wearing it. And the one-piece design also includes dual ports that you can use to add pretty much any type of filter you want. Finally, with a transparent design and open front pane, this mask ensures other people can see your mouth. – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Zagreb received 16 Chinese tourist guides for the first time

first_imgIn accordance with the change in the law, Libertas International University has provided foreign citizens residing in the Republic of Croatia with the opportunity to study to become a tourist guide in the city of Zagreb.The Chinese were the first to use this opportunity. This is the first group of systematically organized candidates with Chinese origin and residence in the Republic of Croatia who, motivated by legislation, decided to access education in order to represent and promote Croatian destinations, and subsequently to previous agreements of Sino-Croatian cooperation.Thus, at the end of last week, a solemn ceremony of awarding certificates for the first Chinese tourist guides for the City of Zagreb was held, and in this way Zagreb received 16 Chinese tourist guides for the first time, in the Croatian language. Also, the establishment of the Association of Chinese Tourism in the Balkans and the Association of Tourist Guides in Chinese was presented, with the aim of connecting guides in order to make the stay of tourists as pleasant as possible. Cultural differences will be most easily bridged through already integrated Chinese such as Chinese guides, Libertas points out, adding “Libertas University is proudly the first educational institution to hold a seminar for a tourist guide of the city of Zagreb for foreign citizens, and the solemn ceremony attended by His Excellency Mr. ZHAOMING HU is just proof that Libertas is a world university.“They conclude from Libertas.Related news:CSEBA BRINGS THE STRONGEST REPRESENTATIVES OF THE CHINESE TOURISM SECTOR TO THE REGIONCROATIA AWARDED IN CHINA AS THE MOST DESIRABLE NEW TOURIST DESTINATIONCROATIAN-CHINESE ECONOMIC FORUM: CHINA WILL PROVIDE 100 MILLION TOURISTS IN A FEW YEARS</p>
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NHP top job to win back Colvin

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Kiwis divided on legalising cannabis, but more are in favour, 1 NEWS poll reveals

first_imgYes – 46%No – 41%Don’t know – 12%*Percentages have been rounded and do not add to 100 per cent. Interviewing took place from October 15 to October 19, with 1006 eligible voters contacted either by landline or mobile phone. The maximum sampling error was ±3.1 per cent.https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/new-zealand/kiwis-divided-legalising-cannabis-but-more-in-favour-1-news-poll-revealsKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox. Twelve per cent were undecided. Those more likely to oppose the legalisation were Asian New Zealanders (55 per cent against) and National Party supporters (52 per cent against). National’s Simeon Brown said there was “a lot of evidence of the harm caused by marijuana, so it’s something we need to take very seriously”. Do you think the personal use of marijuana should be legalised?center_img Forty-six per cent of Kiwis were in favour of legalisation and 41 per cent were against. TVNZ One News 25 October 2018Family First Comment:  Game on! Once we get the facts out, NZ will say No to Big Marijuana. (and this poll makes a mockery of the crap Massey University ‘survey’) #BringItOn#PeopleBeforeProfits www.VoteNo.nzThe latest 1 NEWS Colmar Brunton poll showed Kiwis were slightly more in favour of legalisation than against, with nearly half wanting the drug to be legal. Associate Professor of Psychology Joe Boden said it was his view the law should be changed and that “the laws around cannabis are enforced in a discriminatory manner”.Those who were more likely to support legalisation included Green Party supporters (79 per cent for) and men aged 18-34 (63 per cent for). Chlöe Swarbrick from the Green Party said as long as there is a “respectful, robust discussion” about what regulations around cannabis would look like, “we will see an increase in support”.last_img read more

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Gustin is Late Model winner at Marshalltown

first_imgBy Jeremy FoxMARSHALLTOWN, Iowa (Aug. 14) – Richie Gustin was the winner when IMCA Late Models made their first visit of the season Friday to Marshalltown Speedway.Todd Cooney grabbed the early lead In the Rumours Sports Bar & Grill IMCA Late Models 20-lap feature but had to contend with Paul Nagle and Gustin following an early restart.Cooney and Gustin battled for the lead before the caution came out when Nagle slid off the top of the track. The front pair raced wheel-to-wheel with Cooney scored first at the conclusion of each lap.Gustin was able to complete the pass for the lead on lap 11 and did not let the caution on lap 14 deny him the victory. Cooney settled for second and Darren Ackerman took third from crowd favorite Darrel DeFrance. Chad Holladay was fifth.Visitor Chris Abelson was the Coors Light IMCA Modified winner and Damon Murty topped the Miller Lite IMCA Stock Carss.Curt Hilmer ruled the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods while Eric Stanton notched his sixth local Toby K’s Hideaway IMCA Hobby Stock victory of 2015.Late Models are also on the Aug. 21 card at Marshalltown.last_img read more

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New Sectional Assignments Approved by IHSAA Executive Committee

first_imgThe IHSAA Executive Committee approved the sectional assignments in six team sports for the next two school years.Following a minor adjustment made in boys soccer, the Executive Committee accepted the recommendations of the respective realignment committees which determined the sectional groups for the 2019‐20 and 2020‐21 school years.042919SectionalAssignmentsVolleyball Alignment 2019-20Girls Soccer Alignment 2019-20Boys Soccer Alignment 2019-20Girls Basketball Alignment 2019-20Boys Basketball Alignment 2019-20FB Realignment 2019Three committees consisting of school administrators representing each IHSAA district and class were constructed to realign the sports. The football committee totaled 18 administrators, the basketball and volleyball committee was made up of 12 members and the soccer committee consisted of nine individuals.The baseball and softball realignment committee will meet this summer after both state tournaments conclude in June with their sectional recommendations being presented to the Executive Committee for approval at its August meeting.IHSAA Executive Committee approves Football Mercy Rule Board of Directors Modifies Tournament Success Factor, Fan Ejections result in Suspension.042919.BoardMeetinglast_img read more

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